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Discussion Starter #1
I noticed today when I had my rear wheel off that the new bearings (per BD specs) that I so proudly installed last week didn't spin free AT ALL!! They did when I installed them and I never over torque the Axle. I use a torque wrench and install to specs only! My question is does the center spacer compress when installed and torqued to specs? If so this would account for the tightness when the torque is removed. Anyone know?? OR do I need another set of bearings? The one in the carrier still spins perfect so I don't think they were ever squashed at all or else it would be screwed as well.
 

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actually when the axle is torqued everything compresses ever so slightly, i.e outside spacer pushing on bearing race pushing on inner spacer pushing on opposite bearing race etc, etc.
who installed the bearings?? how where they installed exactly??

BD
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I installed them as I do all my own work. I installed them by useing a heat gun and warming the wheel and freezing the bearings. They usually drop strait in that way without beating on them at all. once everything settles at room temp I always take a drift and tap the outer race to make sure they didn't try and crawl out any during the process. BUT! when I removed the wheel for a gear change I noticed as I stuck my thumb in the bearing that it had a bunch of load on the inner race and was very tight. The only way I can see that this will work for shit would be if the compression of the inner spacer is figured into the torque value of the axle. If that's the case than the bearings wouldn't spin freely until the torque is reapplied and the balls settle back to the center of the races. That's my guess and what I'm wondering is going on.
 

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i can attest to mine turning freely when the wheel is removed with the inner spacer making the absolute slightest contact with both inner races of the bearings, is yours this way as well??

BD
 

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Discussion Starter #5
NO Sir! Mine don't do that at all. The inner spacer is very tight between the two bearings when the wheel is off. It's so tight in fact that you have to stuff a rubber coated pry bar in there to push it offset to get at the inner bearing race to remove the bearings. I'm starting to think the inner spacer on mine is a slight bit toooooo long. I need to consult the manual to see if it has a spec on lenth. This is NOT a good thing. What's yur gut feeling on this BD?
 

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No its not a good thing for sure and should be addressed.

The first question that comes to mind for me is, what was it like before replacing them? was it in fact this tight from the factory?

After doing the front wheel recall my inner spacer was somewhat snug the 2nd time i installed the new bearings which caused them to exhibit more resistance than normal so i used the drift to tap the bearing outward so it releived some contact between them and it was a noticable difference afterwards so you may consider this method and see what the results are.

BD
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I'm going to reinstall the old bearings without the spacer and take measurments between the inner races and check them against my inner spacer lenth to compare. The main question now is how much does the spacer compress during torque load of the axle nut?
 

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Gunner said:
I installed them as I do all my own work. I installed them by useing a heat gun and warming the wheel and freezing the bearings. They usually drop strait in that way without beating on them at all. once everything settles at room temp I always take a drift and tap the outer race to make sure they didn't try and crawl out any during the process. BUT! when I removed the wheel for a gear change I noticed as I stuck my thumb in the bearing that it had a bunch of load on the inner race and was very tight. The only way I can see that this will work for shit would be if the compression of the inner spacer is figured into the torque value of the axle. If that's the case than the bearings wouldn't spin freely until the torque is reapplied and the balls settle back to the center of the races. That's my guess and what I'm wondering is going on.
cool to see someone else used the same method I did when I did a bearing install awhile back on another bike.....posted this same thing a long time ago on another thread and no one said anything...like at least good idea(I think most just go to the dealer and get them pressed in)......but I knew it worked and made it easy.:thumbsup:

Gook luck on your test...I think you are right to make sure everything is normal even if you do have to go back to the stock bearing to make sure. I had bearings fail on me one time(many years ago)....not fun..didn't wreck but it's scarry and not a good sound.:badteeth:
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
OK people this mystery is solved. Kawasaki does indeed figure in the center spacer compression with the torque value of the axle nut. I installed a new set of bearings again and torqued the wheel to specs. Removed the wheel and found the bearings tight. Hmmmm??? So I machined up some spacers so I could torque the axle to spec while NOT installed in the swingarm. So I started with 50 pounds and what do you know the bearings started to loosen up. So I cranked it to the spec of 81 and presto!!! The bearings now spin completely FREE. So the axle was removed and what do you know? The bearings are tight again. So if your bearing are noticed to be tight when the wheel is removed IT'S NORMAL! They loosen up once they are preloaded by the axle torque. If they spin free when the wheel is removed it's a safe bet that when you torque the axle they get tight!!!! It's because the spacer is Aluminum and NOT steel that this compression factor must be figured in. A steel spacer wouldn't require a crush factor.
 

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"""So I machined up some spacers so I could torque the axle to spec while NOT installed in the swingarm."""

cool read. So no machining is required.
 

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Good Post lots and lots of good Info,How do you heat the rim up with a torch?btw Bluwdevil great idea even if its post humous.:thumbsup:
 

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damn!! good stuck is correct, except how do you know when you need to replace your bearings? and why did you replace your bearing's, with better ones?
 

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Slims10R said:
Good Post lots and lots of good Info, How do you heat the rim up with a torch? btw Bluedevil great idea even if its post humous.:thumbsup:
no blowtorch ya LOON :eyecrazy:
a hand held heat gun or perhaps a kerosene space heater (sit the wheel atop it) i dunno if a blow dryer would get hot enough but possible.

BD
 

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Discussion Starter #14
RickRoush03 said:
damn!! good stuck is correct, except how do you know when you need to replace your bearings? and why did you replace your bearing's, with better ones?

Yes I replaced them with the Big Daddy specials:cool: It's a much better bearing. I actually used 2 heat guns at the same time. One on the inside and the other on the ouside to try and heat the wheel evenly.
 
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