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What is the real performance gain by changing the chain from 530 to 520 on
a ZX10R 09.

tks.

For the street absolutely 0.....

If you were racing say Mat Mladin and he was beating you by about 1 one millionth of a second per lap..perhaps it might make a difference....

If you were in that situation you probably would be a whole lot better off by going on a diet and dropping two pounds
 

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I thought all the gens used a 525 stock? Oh well.

The 520 is a little lighter, the whole rotating mass thing. If you are looking for a HP number, I would guess .5 if that.

Switching the rear sprocket to aluminum would do about the same. 520 chains are slightly cheaper, but not enough to really matter.

If you want max effect; switch to 520, alum sprocket on the rear and use a non o ring chain. The chains have less friction (cost less), but need more maintenance and wear much faster.
 

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Dont mess wit White Ninja
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I agree with you...^^ That's word for word what I was about to say...520/530 there are a lot more available sprockets on hand usually at shops though too...
 

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the 1st Gens came with a 525... going down to a 520 saves weight and easier to get the chain rotating faster... a 530 chain is alittle heavier and is also stronger....

IMO, if im putting major stress on that chain im not gonna save alittle weight and risk a chain snapping and injurying myself or any others around me..

just my :2cents:
 

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As long as you go with a 520 chain that is rated for a 1000cc bike, you will be fine. It would be a good time to gear down for more usable power if you are concerned about street riding.

520, -1/+2 is the way I went on my '07. Im happy with it.
 

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520, -1/+2...Good choice, but I sometimes do like going past 165mph even though I should be happy with just that LOL...But for 9/10th's thats a really good setup on the street...
 

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someone correct me if i am wrong but there are a couple of reasons to go to a lighter chain. they both have to do with less rotational mass. i am an MBa and not ME, so i could be wrong.

1. less rotational mass and in turn a more efficient transfer of power (less hp loss in the application of the torque)

2. less rotational mass and in turn less centrifugal forces. this would equate to quicker steering in transfers. yes the weight is not much, but when amplified by the rpm of the rotation i would suspect that its less negligible than we think.
 

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for the street absolutely 0.....

If you were racing say mat mladin and he was beating you by about 1 one millionth of a second per lap..perhaps it might make a difference....

If you were in that situation you probably would be a whole lot better off by going on a diet and dropping two pounds
:+1:
 

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someone correct me if i am wrong but there are a couple of reasons to go to a lighter chain. they both have to do with less rotational mass. i am an MBa and not ME, so i could be wrong.

1. less rotational mass and in turn a more efficient transfer of power (less hp loss in the application of the torque)

2. less rotational mass and in turn less centrifugal forces. this would equate to quicker steering in transfers. yes the weight is not much, but when amplified by the rpm of the rotation i would suspect that its less negligible than we think.
You are correct. I've converted 2 bikes from 530 to 520 and held all the components in each hand. There is a definate difference.

Being that the 10 has a 525 combo from the factory, Im not sure the conversion would be as much of an upgrade.

I will probably wait to convert until my stock setup gets a bit more worn.
 

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i gained 6mph at maxton in a standing mile from changing from the stock chain to a driven 520 kit so i dunno im happy with switching but i also could have just been getting better so i have no idea
 

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I've read all the replies to this question and everyone has valid arguements for going to a 520 and not going to a 520 set up. May i suggest a second way to get rid of some rotating mass. I don't know how your guys brake but for the most part i can't really remember the last time i used the rear brake, plus i have mine set up as just a trail brake to settle the chassis when the bike gets twitchy under hard braking conditions. Drilling out the back brake rotor can shed approx 2 pounds with out turning it into swiss cheese and still leaving it usable. Go to the local hardware store and buy a masonary bit. Find someone who has a drill press and you're good to go. Make sure to use some form of lubricant when drilling and drill at a slow speed.
 

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someone correct me if i am wrong but there are a couple of reasons to go to a lighter chain. they both have to do with less rotational mass. i am an MBa and not ME, so i could be wrong.

1. less rotational mass and in turn a more efficient transfer of power (less hp loss in the application of the torque)

2. less rotational mass and in turn less centrifugal forces. this would equate to quicker steering in transfers. yes the weight is not much, but when amplified by the rpm of the rotation i would suspect that its less negligible than we think.
:iamwithst very well put couldnt have said it better myself:eek:ccasion1
 

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gyration inertia is (radius^2*mass) so lighter chain/sprokets would have less inertia to overcome so steering will be improved allbeit minor compared to effect that the wheels would have. Another possibilty although not a cheap one would be to get lighter weight wheels which comply with relevant design rules. I always use the rear brake on track but as I get more experience I will probably start to reduce this but I doubt I will ever elminate it. I can pull up quicker and the wear on my rear tyre is significantly reduced.
I would not go down the path of drilling out brake disc rotors. I believe this would not comply with relevant design rules and would be a fast way to a canary if caught. If more holes was a safe option the manufacturers would have done that in the first place I am pretty sure you would not get a roadworthy if this done either and scrutineers on tracks days would definitely not allow any bike on their track with this mod (well not here anyway).
 

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The idea is not to drill new holes but to enlarge some of the holes already present which still provides you with a usable back brake and stays within track regulations. Because your rear brake is used less and alot more delicately than the front obviously it isn't subject to the heat and abuse the front brake rotors are. This is a cheap and legal way to shed some weight.
 

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I've read all the replies to this question and everyone has valid arguements for going to a 520 and not going to a 520 set up. May i suggest a second way to get rid of some rotating mass. I don't know how your guys brake but for the most part i can't really remember the last time i used the rear brake, plus i have mine set up as just a trail brake to settle the chassis when the bike gets twitchy under hard braking conditions. Drilling out the back brake rotor can shed approx 2 pounds with out turning it into swiss cheese and still leaving it usable. Go to the local hardware store and buy a masonary bit. Find someone who has a drill press and you're good to go. Make sure to use some form of lubricant when drilling and drill at a slow speed.
About 1 pound is the average for street rotors. Especially newer models where the factories are paying more attention to weight. I never use my rear brake on the street and rarely use it on the track so it doesn't matter but I would think you'd have to make the rotor virtually useless to get 2 lbs off of it. Unless it's a dirtbike rotor, that is. They are relatively heavy from the factory and I've seen 4+ pounds taken off them.

I sent my trackbike rotor to these guys and according to my scale they took off approx. .8 pounds
http://qualitymachineco.com/ :thumbsup:
 
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