Kawasaki ZX-10R Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,757 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
What you guys using for torque wrench? I would rather go with a good hand feeling instead.. except for the rear wheel.. they always seem to be off of increments and not really trusty.. Some parts on the bike is like 5 lbs required.. U sure you want to go with a damn torque wrench??:dontknow:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,413 Posts
What you guys using for torque wrench? I would rather go with a good hand feeling instead.. except for the rear wheel.. they always seem to be off of increments and not really trusty.. Some parts on the bike is like 5 lbs required.. U sure you want to go with a damn torque wrench??:dontknow:
http://www.harborfreight.com/catalogsearch/result?q=torque+wrench

I have the 3 $20 ones.. 1/4"...3/8" and 1/2" drives...havent failed me yet. Lowest range the 3/8" goes is 20ft/lbs...anything under that I just convert to inch/lbs and use the 1/4" Body parts and non essential stuff...I just tighten until..well..tight lol
 

·
Funshine Bear
Joined
·
2,686 Posts
Torque on parts are there for a reason. Those torque specs have come from tons of engineering. It has to so with strech and strength and a bunch of other reason. I torque everything on my bike. I work on planes for a living and if you haven't followed the torque specs exact then your f'ed.
Oh and all my Torque Wrenches are snap on and Calibrated to within 2%
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,385 Posts
I use all snap on tools, they have the electronic one that is the one I use...There is the big daddy for bigger jobs and little son for small jobs. I love them and use them on everything.You can't go wrong torquing to spec.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,043 Posts
i dont own one. although i probably should since i do enough screwing around in the garage.
i always hand tighten and use loctite if im not feelin confident on low torque applications.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,788 Posts
I don't torque everything but some are nessasary. Head bolts and such do matter.
 

·
All show and all go 10r
Joined
·
5,921 Posts
I use a 3/8 drive torque wrench made by JET thats good from 15ft-lbs to 80 ft-lbs and a 1/2 drive Cheap $50 one I use to torque from 80-150 ft lbs. I torque everything that's important, suspension, wheels, motor, etc... They are different lengths and both are the click kind.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,721 Posts
Minichevy is absolutely correct. I just read a tech article where they challenged a top notch factory bike master mechanic to go by "feel". They chose 3 important bolts.....front and rear axle bolts and front axle pinch bolts. They gave him 3 tries each to hit the recommended torque. He was all over the place. For example, the pinch bolts should be at 14 ft lbs. He got like 8, 20 and 25. Same for the axle nuts. For a machine that goes as fast as our bikes do, a torque wrench is a must have. Every time I have my tires changed or chain and sprockets changed, I always "re-torque the nuts. Surprising how much the axle nuts are over-torqued!:headshake
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
370 Posts
I have over tightened one too many bolts over the years and learned my lesson.

Cough up the dough and just buy a GOOD torque wrench(S). Key word is GOOD. Cheap torque wrenches suck.

I got a nice set of 3 different SNAP ON Digital Wrenches off ebay. Set your torque, tighten and then they buzz and vibrate once the torque is reached. Expensive, but worth it. No more drilling out broken off bolts for me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
874 Posts
I've been a mechanic for many years and work on many different vehicles. Everything has a torque spec, but IMO some are more important than others. Many specs are based off the bolt size, pitch, and material along with what its screwed into. I do every bit of repair on anything that comes through my garage from engine rebuild to suspension to hydraulic to paint. I have SK torque wenches that range as low as 4in-lbs to 600ft-lbs. I only use them on crucial bolts where torque is a factor in sealing surfaces or machining clearances like engine crank main bolts and head bolts for example. I have never used a torque wench on a wheel stud on any vehicle I have worked on and I have never stripped one, nor ever lost one.

On a bike I can understand on something like the pinch bolt or caliper bolt that was in that article for the manufacture to stress the specs bc its into aluminum and your average driveway mechanic could easily over tighten and strip it out. But come on, 20ftlbs compared to 14 is no going to make a beans of difference in the performance of the part in those cases. Then take a look a look at the rear axle. You tighten it to spec, but then you have to keep tightening it till the hole lines up with a slot in the crown and that can be different ever single time. So obviously in that case you don't end up at the same torque every time either.

I don't disagree that an experienced mechanics hand is not a replacement for a torque wench, but I think they are just making too big of a deal out of the importance of using the exact spec for each little part. I bet most of you wouldn't want to pay your mechanic the extra time to sit and torque every bold he removed from your vehicle to repair it as he reassembles it.

One last thing, they never actually tell you how they measured the torque of the bolts the mechanic put in. I can tell you from experience that if you torque a bolt down a certain spec then bump the spec up another 2ft lbs, and tighten in again, the bolt will not move enough if at all for he human eye to notice. It will just click and be in the same spot.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top