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Discussion Starter #1
Riding down to Daytona for bike week 1000mi round trip. Just my 200lb self and a backpack with clothes. I know everyone is looking for riding pressures what about minimal wear on tires for 80mph cruises?

Running Stock size battalax t30evos

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Fyi, nothing a Honda goldwing forum is going to tell you will help... since...
1. They are on a different bike
2. There's a solid chance they don't have the same tire
3. That dont weigh the same as you personally.
So please don't take that advice.

If you call Bridgestone tech line they can tell you the proper psi for your tire and then you can adjust based on wear. You want full contact with as less heat as possible, so you don't want them under inflated at all.

What kawasaki suggests for the bike is actually pretty good for tire wear, but you need to adjust for rider weight
 

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Tire pressures are set depending on the conditions it's being used for. The numbers given by most bike and tire manufacturers try to achieve a single optimal pressure based on that particular tire for a multitude of conditions. Track riders know the difference though and can and will adjust pressures throughout the day multiple times. Colder in the morning sessions usually means less pressure than warmer afternoon sessions with some tire wear. But a 1-2lb pressure change can make a difference there.

Obviously, for straight out cruising the higher pressures will benefit you to keep the contact patch lower and tire carcass deformation to a minimum. Most tires are rated for a 42psi cold setting. This would be the max pressure set to support higher weights (passenger, cargo, etc). I wouldn't hesitate to pump the rear up that high for long distance cruising in a straight line. But, your traction and braking distances will be reduced slightly and so will your lean angles since your contact patch is lower and the tire firmer. Take it easy, get to your destination, and readjust your pressures accordingly once you get there. And ride it for the conditions you set.
 
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36/40 or 36/42 for a relaxed (or intermediate) ride on the highway. It also opens up the tires water dispensal treads for better traction in the wet, at the expense of less traction in the dry (you won't have a problem under 120 mph unless you take crazy corners at crazy angles).
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Fyi, nothing a Honda goldwing forum is going to tell you will help... since...
1. They are on a different bike
2. There's a solid chance they don't have the same tire
3. That dont weigh the same as you personally.
So please don't take that advice.

If you call Bridgestone tech line they can tell you the proper psi for your tire and then you can adjust based on wear. You want full contact with as less heat as possible, so you don't want them under inflated at all.

What kawasaki suggests for the bike is actually pretty good for tire wear, but you need to adjust for rider weight
What is there tech line? All the numbers I call are people telling me to call a local store and that's no help.

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Discussion Starter #12
Guess my next question is if I pimp my tires up in 40 degree weather at 38 rear and 36 front and then ride into 75 degree weather do I have a chance of over inflation?

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Discussion Starter #15 (Edited)
Well I read somewhere for every 10 degrees Fahrenheit adds 1psi. So at 40 degrees to 75 degrees I should see close to 4psi change. Which makes me think I should go 34f and 36r.... Make sense? Or no?

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Well I read somewhere for every 10 degrees Fahrenheit adds 1psi. So at 40 degrees to 75 degrees I should see close to 4psi change. Which makes me think I should go 34f and 36r.... Make sense? Or no?
A good question. A simplified ballpark rule for our purpose and "normal circumstances", pressure increases about 1 psi for every 10 Fahrenheit increase as you say.

The front will be above recommended "manual up-to pressure" if your weather estimations are correct. If you are worried, get a decent quality pressure gauge to keep on the bike and you can let out a little if necessary.

You should really get one anyway. If you normally ride, (even slow for just a mile) to the gas station to check cold pressure, it will be off. On top of that we have the lack of calibration and consistency of gas station gauges, leaking hoses etc. A simple foot pump and a gauge works great for setting cold tire pressure at home. You don`t need a compressor.

The s21 which i normally run flexes too much and heats up, and wears pretty fast with 36 rear for this type of riding and my weight (205lbs). In my experience ~36/40 gives ok balance but favoring less wear in these situations. Your tire may or may not do better though. Also depends on how long before you reach warmer climate. I would rather start higher and let out along the way down. You probably do one overnight stop right?

And have a great trip, post some pictures when you get back :thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter #19
A good question. A simplified ballpark rule for our purpose and "normal circumstances", pressure increases about 1 psi for every 10 Fahrenheit increase as you say.

The front will be above recommended "manual up-to pressure" if your weather estimations are correct. If you are worried, get a decent quality pressure gauge to keep on the bike and you can let out a little if necessary.

You should really get one anyway. If you normally ride, (even slow for just a mile) to the gas station to check cold pressure, it will be off. On top of that we have the lack of calibration and consistency of gas station gauges, leaking hoses etc. A simple foot pump and a gauge works great for setting cold tire pressure at home. You don`t need a compressor.

The s21 which i normally run flexes too much and heats up, and wears pretty fast with 36 rear for this type of riding and my weight (205lbs). In my experience ~36/40 gives ok balance but favoring less wear in these situations. Your tire may or may not do better though. Also depends on how long before you reach warmer climate. I would rather start higher and let out along the way down. You probably do one overnight stop right?

And have a great trip, post some pictures when you get back
It's 40 right now just completed 100 mi on 34f 36r

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No, sorry, information is wrong, you are still thinking backwards.

Not to worry, most people really don't understand it.

Let me start by saying recommended tire pressure in the manual or
on the swing arm, etc. is totally irrelevant, meaningless. ok, maybe not
useless, gives you a place to start and monitor psi, but has nothing
to do with the "correct" psi for your needs.

Tires do have a "safety notice" on the tire which should not be exceeded.
Like "MAX" tire pressure cold.

Where are you getting your tire pressures from? Best guess?

Motorcycle tires are all about getting the right amount of heat in them.

The right psi will change due to load on the tire, 1-2 riders, weight, riding style, temp, etc.

How do you know what the right psi is?

You measure the difference in cold psi to hot psi. That "IS" the only way.

For street 2-3 psi diff from cold to hot is good.

For track 5-6 psi cold to hot is good.

Tires create heat by flexing the carcass.

If you have selected the correct psi, bringing the tire to the
correct hot psi when it's cold out, which will requite lower psi to
create the right amount of flex in the tire to create the proper heat.

Now, when its hotter out, you will need to raise the psi to create
less flex in the tire or you will be creating to much heat in the tire.

cold out, set cold psi to raise 2-3 psi hot

Hot out, the same cold set psi may raise 4-5 psi hot. In this case
raising cold psi by like 2-3 psi, creating less flex, creating less heat may
only raise 2-3 psi

Like the safety notice on the tire of MAX cold psi, well if you load you and
your 300lb girlfriend, 60 cans of spam in the panniers for the weekend, you
might actually overload the tires, simply because you couldn't put enough
air in them by not going over max psi, tire would then flex to much and over heat. This is the reason a lot of the heavier touring bikes use a stiff wall tire to keep psi reasonable and reduce flex with heavier load. Of coarse there is max weight load too.

I can even tell how someone is riding at the track.
At the track I set my tires 31f/31r and when I pull in the pits end of session, I get 36f/36r, perfect.

I can set a friends bike 31f/31r and when they get back they have 36f/34r
which tells me the are pinning it, but not braking very hard. So.. drop cold to 31f/29r and check again looking to still get that 5-6psi rise in the front.

You get the idea.

So yes, if you tires where set correctly in the morning, they could
be under inflated in the afternoon.

"This is" how setting your psi works.

Once you check the cold to hot psi a few times you'll have it down.

Carry a gauge, measure when leaving, measure when pull over when hot.
Note the difference. Next morning adjust cold and do again until
you get it where you want like 2-3psi diff.
 
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