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Discussion Starter #1
I talked to a guy named Rick today at Kawasaki's US distrib.

First question I asked is if CA models will come with the kleen Air system. The answer was yes, they will. That sucks, because now I gotta buy tubing, etc to remove that lame fucking smog shit. But it made a world of difference on my 636, so im praying the process will be similar.

Next question was about delivery date: He said that as of right now there should be the bulk of the first shipment delivered to the corperate by the first few days of feburary. After inspecting each, the dealers should obtain there first shipments roughly around Feb 14th.

Just two more weeks if thats true. Can't wait.
 

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Can anyone explain what the kleen air system is? I know it has something to do with motorcycle emmisions laws going into effect in 06' but thats all I know. :oops:
 

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Discussion Starter #7
big b said:
andy I sent you a description of the clean air system to your box. It was straight from a kawasaki bulletin :D :D
It's only for CA models. So if you are outside of CA you don't have to worry about it. But if you are inside there is a guide on www.kawiforums.com, just do a search for kleen removal and it shows the step my step removal instructions for a 636. I have to assume the process is much the same for the 10, but with larger hoses, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
NinjaJoe said:
That kleen stuff reduces power? If it dosent why remove it besides saving a few pounds...your saving the ozone layer :D
It doesnt kill horsepower really. Though some claim horsepower gains with its removal. It does kill however throttle response. In fact it can make throttle response down right choppy on the 636 anyways. When I removed it, I was one happy camper let me tell you. I didnt think it would make any difference, but people on the forum kept telling me it was worth it. So I spent the weekend tracking down proper hoses and clamps and they were right. Best 7.00 upgrade I ever made.
 

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CDRacingZX6R said:
NinjaJoe said:
That kleen stuff reduces power? If it dosent why remove it besides saving a few pounds...your saving the ozone layer :D
It doesnt kill horsepower really. Though some claim horsepower gains with its removal. It does kill however throttle response. In fact it can make throttle response down right choppy on the 636 anyways. When I removed it, I was one happy camper let me tell you. I didnt think it would make any difference, but people on the forum kept telling me it was worth it. So I spent the weekend tracking down proper hoses and clamps and they were right. Best 7.00 upgrade I ever made.
Kawasaki use Kleen to describe the pollution system in their bikes. It relies on three separate system in CA , air injection into the exhaust ports, honeycomb catalyser in the exhaust and the third for CA only the fuel evaporation catch tank.

In the 49 state, Europe and other markets, the Kleen is just the first two. Air injection and catalyser. I am not aware of any differences with either the two or the full three components.

Remember the air injection only operates on the closed throttle under de-acceleration as soon as the intake vacuum rises the system closes. It has no effect under open throttle. Catalyser if badly design may affect power, but I have only seen slight power decreases if and when removed.

The CA models may weight a pound or more but I have never seen any manufacture claim less power for a CA model.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Ninja said:
CDRacingZX6R said:
NinjaJoe said:
That kleen stuff reduces power? If it dosent why remove it besides saving a few pounds...your saving the ozone layer :D
It doesnt kill horsepower really. Though some claim horsepower gains with its removal. It does kill however throttle response. In fact it can make throttle response down right choppy on the 636 anyways. When I removed it, I was one happy camper let me tell you. I didnt think it would make any difference, but people on the forum kept telling me it was worth it. So I spent the weekend tracking down proper hoses and clamps and they were right. Best 7.00 upgrade I ever made.
Kawasaki use Kleen to describe the pollution system in their bikes. It relies on three separate system in CA , air injection into the exhaust ports, honeycomb catalyser in the exhaust and the third for CA only the fuel evaporation catch tank.

In the 49 state, Europe and other markets, the Kleen is just the first two. Air injection and catalyser. I am not aware of any differences with either the two or the full three components.

Remember the air injection only operates on the closed throttle under de-acceleration as soon as the intake vacuum rises the system closes. It has no effect under open throttle. Catalyser if badly design may affect power, but I have only seen slight power decreases if and when removed.

The CA models may weight a pound or more but I have never seen any manufacture claim less power for a CA model.
You are correct as well as incorrect. The part you forgot however is where the air is being taken from and injected into. The original 636 Kleen setup has the intake ports changed slightly than the 49 state legal brothers which ultimately messes up the crankcase vacuum pressure all together. Having the crankcase properly pressurized is extremely important for acceleration as well as declaration. By using the Kleen setup on your bike it is indirectly hindering your crankcase pressure. This isn’t including the three crankcase vents which right now are not functioning correctly because of in improper crankcase pressure. It’s been and will continue to be a well known fact that the Kawasaki Kleen system cause choppy and slower rev/throttle response. The average rider probably wouldn’t notice. Neither did I until I performed the removal myself.

http://www.kawiforums.com/forum/topic.asp?TOPIC_ID=12586&SearchTerms=kleen,air

More information there if anyone is interested.
 

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Kawasaki Air Injection System
On most models takes the air for injection into the exhaust ports from the air cleaner housing.

The air injection system is controlled by a vacuum operated air control valve.

In most models it is controlled by vacuum, however in some new 2004 models this is now ECU controlled. See VN2000

The vacuum used to control the system is taken from the intake port of one cylinder. The vacuum pulls a sealed diaphragm against a spring to open the valve and let the air through the valve. The spring returns the valve to the closed position when the throttle is open.

As the vacuum system is sealed it does not change the mixture in the cylinder, which supplies the vacuum. It only opens under relative high vacuum i.e. throttle closed.

To prevent the chance of an exhaust backfire reaching the air box, one-way reed valves are installed in the cylinder head cover.

The system works by reducing unburnt hydrocarbons being emitted out the exhaust by injecting fresh air to completely burn any unburnt gasses under closed throttles.

It is not a new feature and has been used by Kawasaki for many years.

Kawasaki models vent the crankcase into the air cleaner housing to recycle any blow by from the crankcase back through the intake system.

Most models have only one crankcase vent. ZX636B 03 model last time I looked had only one crankcase vent, top crankcase at the rear.

The reed valves are connected to the exhaust port by a sealed tube. Sealed to prevent the oil contaminating the system of by having exhaust gases leak into the crankcases.

Possible performance issues with the KAIS.

Air leaks passed the diaphragm or leaking vacuum through an small hole in the vacuum line will upset the mixture in the cylinder operating the system.

Valve fails to open results in higher emissions.
Valve opens and fails to close the air injection is open and will circulate fresh air passed the reed valves into the exhaust.

CA models have additional tubes for the gas canister. Last time I looked 4 color-coded tubes connect to the canister. These control the flow of fuel tank gasoline vapour and any other gasoline vapour emissions back to the canister and recycle the condensed gasoline back to the intake side of the engine.

Down sides of this system, weight, many tubes and easy to connect wrong.

This not to say problems are not possible, in my experience it would be extremely rare considering the amount of Kawasaki sold with this exact same system.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Ninja said:
Kawasaki Air Injection System
On most models takes the air for injection into the exhaust ports from the air cleaner housing.

The air injection system is controlled by a vacuum operated air control valve.

In most models it is controlled by vacuum, however in some new 2004 models this is now ECU controlled. See VN2000

The vacuum used to control the system is taken from the intake port of one cylinder. The vacuum pulls a sealed diaphragm against a spring to open the valve and let the air through the valve. The spring returns the valve to the closed position when the throttle is open.

As the vacuum system is sealed it does not change the mixture in the cylinder, which supplies the vacuum. It only opens under relative high vacuum i.e. throttle closed.

To prevent the chance of an exhaust backfire reaching the air box, one-way reed valves are installed in the cylinder head cover.

The system works by reducing unburnt hydrocarbons being emitted out the exhaust by injecting fresh air to completely burn any unburnt gasses under closed throttles.

It is not a new feature and has been used by Kawasaki for many years.

Kawasaki models vent the crankcase into the air cleaner housing to recycle any blow by from the crankcase back through the intake system.

Most models have only one crankcase vent. ZX636B 03 model last time I looked had only one crankcase vent, top crankcase at the rear.

The reed valves are connected to the exhaust port by a sealed tube. Sealed to prevent the oil contaminating the system of by having exhaust gases leak into the crankcases.

Possible performance issues with the KAIS.

Air leaks passed the diaphragm or leaking vacuum through an small hole in the vacuum line will upset the mixture in the cylinder operating the system.

Valve fails to open results in higher emissions.
Valve opens and fails to close the air injection is open and will circulate fresh air passed the reed valves into the exhaust.

CA models have additional tubes for the gas canister. Last time I looked 4 color-coded tubes connect to the canister. These control the flow of fuel tank gasoline vapour and any other gasoline vapour emissions back to the canister and recycle the condensed gasoline back to the intake side of the engine.

Down sides of this system, weight, many tubes and easy to connect wrong.

This not to say problems are not possible, in my experience it would be extremely rare considering the amount of Kawasaki sold with this exact same system.
All your fuctions of the Kleen system are 100 percent correct. But you are probably aware of Newtons law of pressure. The longer a distance air travels within a closed system, the less pressure and force it has as it’s expanded. This is especially true with Kawasaki’s kleen system.

The new 2004 Kleen system is a question mark as of right now to me. I don’t know if it follows the same setup guidelines as the 2003 which was vacuum controlled, but I’d be surprised it if was exactly the same. Especially after all the people whom were complaining about the system since it was first put on the bike in the first place.

By running the crankcase directly to the exhaust air value you are creating a tighter area were less air needs to travel in order to go the same distance. Not to mention there is always flex in tubing, etc because it is made of rubber.

Things which cause to much pressure loss include but are not limited to: Fuel return pump and the exhaust air switching value (The biggest force in horsepower loss using this system)

However the biggest factor in increasing the pressure and helping the accelerator is capping off the three vacuum ports/throttle bodied . This has the biggest impact on how fast your bike’s throttle response will be.

You don’t have to take my word for it. But I’ve done this to not only my bike, but my brothers bike. And it has made a huge difference for both of us. I’ve also researched this topic so many times my eyes are starting to bleed. The most common response people say is “I feel like the bike rev’s faster, or the throttle is quicker”. Hence the reason for doing this conversion in the first place. Some of the people who are far knowledgeable than I on www.kawiforums.com have reported doing this system and having great results. Don’t take my word for it, but you should check out there opinions and maybe take some of there’s.

Maybe this new system will be better since it’s computer controlled now. If it isn’t you can bet I the first thing I do is remove this crap.
 

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The ZX10R retains the vacuum operated air valve; I said some (one) 2004 models have the new electric air valve see the VN2000.

The VN2000 has each piston with a cylinder capacity larger than a ZX10R.

These big pistons had Kawasaki looking for greater control over the air valve and they opted for the ECU controlled system.

It is not an admission by Kawasaki that one system works better than the other.

It is the use of a new system is for one very large engine, with unique requirements. The VN2000 also meets all the emission standards world-wide without impacting on the performance of the engine, 110 PS and enough torque to battle lots of sports bikes with its sheer grunt from a long stroke V-Twin engine.

I now can easily understand how some black magic/voodoo features on bikes get a bad wrap.

The only air going through the air valve is from the air box. The emissions from the crankcase vent into the air box is relative free of crap, unless the piston or rings are leaking blow-by and require replacing.

The air injection is into the exhaust port after the exhaust valve it does not travel back into the engine, it has no effect on the combustion process in the cylinder. It has no effect on the top end wear.

Internal air box pressure increases with speed and because the crankcase is vented into the air box the engine crankcase under certain conditions may actually have above atmospheric pressure in the crankcase. Which is against all current high performance theories, Nascar, F1, RC211V etc

Will this have an impact on performance? Not at the speed range most steet engines operate.

The CA model has extra vacuum lines for the recirculation of the gas fumes. Because of the size of this canister the volume of air travelling through this system is much large than what is required to open and close the air valve.

CA models may work better with this gas fumes recirculation system disconnected (for racing purposes only).

I still do not believe the KAIS system is bad, however we are all guided by our own experience. That is not to say someone may experience some change if the KAIS is disconnected.

However when I prepare the ZX10R for racing the first modification is the removal of the air valve. Why? because the value of the air injection systems reed valves should not be ignored and their ability to provide a relative energy free source of vacuum for other benefits such as crankcase negative pressure can and should not be ignored.

Would I remove the KAIS on my Ninja ZX10R for street riding? the answer is no. Do I have any reason to expect my 49 state model would require modification for street riding? again no.

Kleen is the combination of the KAIS and the honeycomb catalyser in the muffler or tail pipe. It is a standard feature on 49 state and the European models. It is also used on the CA model with the addition of gas tank fumes recirculation.

Next subject?
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Ninja said:
The ZX10R retains the vacuum operated air valve; I said some (one) 2004 models have the new electric air valve see the VN2000.

The VN2000 has each piston with a cylinder capacity larger than a ZX10R.

These big pistons had Kawasaki looking for greater control over the air valve and they opted for the ECU controlled system.

It is not an admission by Kawasaki that one system works better than the other.

It is the use of a new system is for one very large engine, with unique requirements. The VN2000 also meets all the emission standards world-wide without impacting on the performance of the engine, 110 PS and enough torque to battle lots of sports bikes with its sheer grunt from a long stroke V-Twin engine.

I now can easily understand how some black magic/voodoo features on bikes get a bad wrap.

The only air going through the air valve is from the air box. The emissions from the crankcase vent into the air box is relative free of crap, unless the piston or rings are leaking blow-by and require replacing.

The air injection is into the exhaust port after the exhaust valve it does not travel back into the engine, it has no effect on the combustion process in the cylinder. It has no effect on the top end wear.

Internal air box pressure increases with speed and because the crankcase is vented into the air box the engine crankcase under certain conditions may actually have above atmospheric pressure in the crankcase. Which is against all current high performance theories, Nascar, F1, RC211V etc

Will this have an impact on performance? Not at the speed range most steet engines operate.

The CA model has extra vacuum lines for the recirculation of the gas fumes. Because of the size of this canister the volume of air travelling through this system is much large than what is required to open and close the air valve.

CA models may work better with this gas fumes recirculation system disconnected (for racing purposes only).

I still do not believe the KAIS system is bad, however we are all guided by our own experience. That is not to say someone may experience some change if the KAIS is disconnected.

However when I prepare the ZX10R for racing the first modification is the removal of the air valve. Why? because the value of the air injection systems reed valves should not be ignored and their ability to provide a relative energy free source of vacuum for other benefits such as crankcase negative pressure can and should not be ignored.

Would I remove the KAIS on my Ninja ZX10R for street riding? the answer is no. Do I have any reason to expect my 49 state model would require modification for street riding? again no.

Kleen is the combination of the KAIS and the honeycomb catalyser in the muffler or tail pipe. It is a standard feature on 49 state and the European models. It is also used on the CA model with the addition of gas tank fumes recirculation.

Next subject?
I disagree with you. Along with many others. Not about the fuctions, but about the results. It doesn’t matter though, to each his own. :D
 

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CDRacingZX6R said:
Ninja said:
The ZX10R retains the vacuum operated air valve; I said some (one) 2004 models have the new electric air valve see the VN2000.

The VN2000 has each piston with a cylinder capacity larger than a ZX10R.

These big pistons had Kawasaki looking for greater control over the air valve and they opted for the ECU controlled system.

It is not an admission by Kawasaki that one system works better than the other.

It is the use of a new system is for one very large engine, with unique requirements. The VN2000 also meets all the emission standards world-wide without impacting on the performance of the engine, 110 PS and enough torque to battle lots of sports bikes with its sheer grunt from a long stroke V-Twin engine.

I now can easily understand how some black magic/voodoo features on bikes get a bad wrap.

The only air going through the air valve is from the air box. The emissions from the crankcase vent into the air box is relative free of crap, unless the piston or rings are leaking blow-by and require replacing.

The air injection is into the exhaust port after the exhaust valve it does not travel back into the engine, it has no effect on the combustion process in the cylinder. It has no effect on the top end wear.

Internal air box pressure increases with speed and because the crankcase is vented into the air box the engine crankcase under certain conditions may actually have above atmospheric pressure in the crankcase. Which is against all current high performance theories, Nascar, F1, RC211V etc

Will this have an impact on performance? Not at the speed range most steet engines operate.

The CA model has extra vacuum lines for the recirculation of the gas fumes. Because of the size of this canister the volume of air travelling through this system is much large than what is required to open and close the air valve.

CA models may work better with this gas fumes recirculation system disconnected (for racing purposes only).

I still do not believe the KAIS system is bad, however we are all guided by our own experience. That is not to say someone may experience some change if the KAIS is disconnected.

However when I prepare the ZX10R for racing the first modification is the removal of the air valve. Why? because the value of the air injection systems reed valves should not be ignored and their ability to provide a relative energy free source of vacuum for other benefits such as crankcase negative pressure can and should not be ignored.

Would I remove the KAIS on my Ninja ZX10R for street riding? the answer is no. Do I have any reason to expect my 49 state model would require modification for street riding? again no.

Kleen is the combination of the KAIS and the honeycomb catalyser in the muffler or tail pipe. It is a standard feature on 49 state and the European models. It is also used on the CA model with the addition of gas tank fumes recirculation.

Next subject?
I disagree with you. Along with many others. Not about the fuctions, but about the results. It doesn’t matter though, to each his own. :D
I would have expected no less.
 
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