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I feel like a schmuck having to ask because I read tons of posts on suspension set-up and I realize it is all personal preference. Sag is the first thing you should do assuming the head bearings, tire alignment etc etc are all good. I don't really have a problem with setting sag so I wanted to ask those that know:


What I wanted to ask is what are some recommended compression and rebound settings for a 2005 ZX-10R keeping in mind that they are for bumpier roads for this time of year. I weigh around 210 lbs. I'm not 100% sure but I don't think backing out both the compression and rebound damping all the way is the answer here. Anyone have any feedback on what I should go for on settings for both front and rear. Damn, sometimes I encounter some pretty challenging bumpy sections of backroads and it feels like the bike is very harsh and twitchy over bumps and wants to buck and throw me off it seems. Is it just too much to ask from the stock suspension or can this scenario be tweaked.


I read as much as I could from articles and books. From what I gather if the damping is all the way in then it compresses or rebounds fast, all the way out slow. That is fine but if you are setting up for bumpier sections and you are hitting very abrupt impressions in the ashphalt should I be wanting fast settings or slow?? What would you guys set for bumpy pavement. Please don't say move to Cali or just ride on a smooth track.:eek:ccasion1 Thanks
 

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You need compliance for bumpy roads, and you need to make sure there's enough travel available (both up and down) to minimize bottoming-out and topping-out. I have the same issue here; our backroads are not in good shape, and the stock setup was too flighty and unstable.

Your damping "sense" is reversed. Threading the adjuster in (clockwise) closes off a needle valve. Backing it out opens up an orifice with a tapered needle in it to reduce the damping of whatever it is that you are adjusting.

I weigh about the same as you do (scary ...). BUT ... I have a 2004 model, and the 2005 suspension has some changes in it, AND everyone has their own preferences, so you'll probably end up with something different.

Keep in mind that this is a "stability on bumpy roads" setting and NOT a "maximum lean on smooth racetrack" setting. They will be VERY different, and this setup probably would result in too much bottoming at maximum lean and less than ideal "feel" at maximum lean. BUT ... it calms the bike down on bumpy roads so that it doesn't feel like every bump is going to send the bike into the weeds.

Front preload - at 8th line showing (backed out considerably). This was necessary to get about 35mm sag in the front, and THAT is necessary so that the front wheel has some ability to follow depressions in the road without leaving the ground.

Front ride height - forks slid up 3mm in the clamps from stock (to correct the steering feel and make it more neutral - less tendency to stand up)

Front compression damping - 12 clicks out from fully clockwise (standard is 7 clicks out). Necessary to take some harshness out and reduce the tendency for sharp bumps to be transmitted right into the chassis. The right solution is revalved forks that reduce the high-speed compression damping without reducing low-speed damping, but we're not that sophisticated yet.

Front rebound damping - 10 clicks out (standard is 9). Not much difference from standard here.

Rear preload - stock setting gave me roughly correct sag (around 28mm).

Rear ride height - stock

Rear compression damping - full soft, 5 turns out. Again, it's to get some harshness out. Really, it needs a better shock with less high-speed damping to fix this properly.

Rear rebound damping - 1 turn out (standard is 1.75 turns out). Necessary to keep the rear from pogo-ing.

And ... STEERING DAMPER.

Your mileage may vary ...
 

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Don't mean to jack your thread, but since I'm new to the forum I thought this thread might be a good place to expand the suspension discussion. Besides this should be almost exactly opposite of what you want. I have a problem on the track.

I am seeing a rear wheel hop wear on the edge of the "apex" of the tire. Don't know the correct term, but it is the place where the contact patch of the tire meets the sidewall. It looks like someone has come along with a file and smoothed out the apex every two or three inches. Only see this on the rear wheel. I have been running Dragons and am switching to Pilot Powers (because of wear issues) after my next ride. While I do let the rear end step out on occassion I don't think that is the problem (I don't pretend to be Rossi, so when the rear end brakes loose, I just pucker up and ride it out). I really just want to figure this out. I'm assuming its damping or the spring rate. I weigh about 205 with full gear. Any suggestions?
 
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