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How good is the factory suspension settings on the gen 4? Ive been wanting to get my suspension dialed in for my weight but haven't came across anyone that can do it for me. It's starting to get warmer out here so I'm ready to lean her over. It was about 65 out today and we hit up some good roads but the suspension felt kinda eh. Like I couldn't trust it. Maybe it's just me feeling cautious from low sliding my old 08 cbr1000rr :dontknow:
 

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At those height and weight numbers, you'll probably need to go with a lighter spring up front. Are you Asian? :lol: But seriously, the shock is the limiting factor and really undersprung for most heavier riders. You should be able to get the stock suspension to work fairly well for you unless you're running at a high level on the track.

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The common misunderstanding is that you can "dial in your suspension."

When you get it "dialed in" that's based on the current conditions only. Change one of a million variables and it's no longer "dialed in."

Variables include: Ambient air temp, track surface temp, track/road style, riding style, current skill level, tire pressures, condition of tires, gearing, HP, TQ, power delivery, body weight, tire compound, etc.................................

Sorry, I'm sure it's been said a 1,000 times. but hey, what's 1,001 among friends? ;) lol

Work on your set up based on what it's doing that you don't like. Not based on your weight.

If the bike isn't preventing you from doing what you want, go faster (on the track, of course) until it either does something you don't like or until it prevents you from doing something you WANT to do. Then address that item, then repeat the process.

You can set the bike up based on your sag numbers, say that means you need a 1.0 springs all around. Then you go to Barber with some incredible g-loads and now you're bottoming out the forks and need a 1.05. Well the sag numbers went out the window. Now you take the same bike and the same rider to say JGP or RRR where it's flat and no g-loads and you have WAY too much spring. Now you're running a .95... uh oh...

I crew chief for a rider who weighs 195. We have run as light as a .85 on a GSXR 1000 at RRR, and as heavy as a 1.15 at Barber (got 6th at the last AMA SBK race there last year). Same rider, same bike.

Just my $0.02.
 

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The common misunderstanding is that you can "dial in your suspension."

When you get it "dialed in" that's based on the current conditions only. Change one of a million variables and it's no longer "dialed in."

Variables include: Ambient air temp, track surface temp, track/road style, riding style, current skill level, tire pressures, condition of tires, gearing, HP, TQ, power delivery, body weight, tire compound, etc.................................

Sorry, I'm sure it's been said a 1,000 times. but hey, what's 1,001 among friends? ;) lol

Work on your set up based on what it's doing that you don't like. Not based on your weight.

If the bike isn't preventing you from doing what you want, go faster (on the track, of course) until it either does something you don't like or until it prevents you from doing something you WANT to do. Then address that item, then repeat the process.

You can set the bike up based on your sag numbers, say that means you need a 1.0 springs all around. Then you go to Barber with some incredible g-loads and now you're bottoming out the forks and need a 1.05. Well the sag numbers went out the window. Now you take the same bike and the same rider to say JGP or RRR where it's flat and no g-loads and you have WAY too much spring. Now you're running a .95... uh oh...

I crew chief for a rider who weighs 195. We have run as light as a .85 on a GSXR 1000 at RRR, and as heavy as a 1.15 at Barber (got 6th at the last AMA SBK race there last year). Same rider, same bike.

Just my $0.02.
While this is a very valid post, most people are looking for that "ideal setup" that meets 90% of their street riding and not just how it came from Kawi. All without dropping on dime on upgrades from the stock stuff.

You're referring mostly to track riding which will be dictated by a lot of different things, as you say. But even just the basics of setting sag based on rider weight should be step numero uno when the bike comes off the showroom floor. That's true whether you're cruising to Starbucks or railing it on the banks of Daytona.
 

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While this is a very valid post, most people are looking for that "ideal setup" that meets 90% of their street riding and not just how it came from Kawi. All without dropping on dime on upgrades from the stock stuff.

You're referring mostly to track riding which will be dictated by a lot of different things, as you say. But even just the basics of setting sag based on rider weight should be step numero uno when the bike comes off the showroom floor. That's true whether you're cruising to Starbucks or railing it on the banks of Daytona.
For me, that same applies whether it's on the street or the track.

What happens if you weigh 230 lbs, you spend money on springs, etc... to set your sag, then you go for a ride and now you don't like how it feels. Especially if you've been riding it for a while nice and soft, now it feels much stiffer than it did.

Now you spent money on springs and a suspension guy to get something you don't like and now you need to go back to you "suspension guy" to have him adjust it until you get it where you like it.

What is that requires going to a softer spring? Maybe even the springs you took out? lol

Why not start by fixing the "issues" you have, then IF you need springs (lighter or heavier) you pay for them at that time?

But, to each his own! :D

:eek:ccasion1

We all have a way of doing things! None are right or wrong (well maybe... lol)
 

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g4 is ready to go right from the dealer. Nothing wrong with the forks; or the brakes; or the damper; or the shock; or the sag (unless rider is t-rex).

Do it all with the throttle. Takes a little study and maybe some superbike classes from Code.
 

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For me, that same applies whether it's on the street or the track.

What happens if you weigh 230 lbs, you spend money on springs, etc... to set your sag, then you go for a ride and now you don't like how it feels. Especially if you've been riding it for a while nice and soft, now it feels much stiffer than it did.

Now you spent money on springs and a suspension guy to get something you don't like and now you need to go back to you "suspension guy" to have him adjust it until you get it where you like it.

What is that requires going to a softer spring? Maybe even the springs you took out? lol

Why not start by fixing the "issues" you have, then IF you need springs (lighter or heavier) you pay for them at that time?

But, to each his own! :D

:eek:ccasion1

We all have a way of doing things! None are right or wrong (well maybe... lol)
I agree. I think you should ride your bike and address problems that you find. A lot of people spend big money on suspension and brakes when they're not even close to the limit of the stock stuff. Why switch to a stiffer suspension when you're not riding hard enough to compress it?

I think too many people get caught up buying parts for a track bike so they fit in with the other guys. If you're in novice-intermediate level track days the stock stuff on most supersports is more than sufficient. You don't want to be the guy on the $25k built liter bike getting passed by a stock R6.
 

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Niner1000 and bun1t are talking way above the intended point of this thread. And Scout is out to lunch as usual. :wink:

You guys are on point. No one is advocating dropping money on the suspension "just because". We're just saying playing with the stock settings to get it setup properly is to a rider's advantage. And it's typical that the rear spring is the weak link if the rider is too heavy (like me). Set what you got, and start spending the money on the deficiencies once you're riding exceeds the abilities of the settings and components you have.


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Niner1000 and bun1t are talking way above the intended point of this thread. And Scout is out to lunch as usual. :wink:

You guys are on point. No one is advocating dropping money on the suspension "just because". We're just saying playing with the stock settings to get it setup properly is to a rider's advantage. And it's typical that the rear spring is the weak link if the rider is too heavy (like me). Set what you got, and start spending the money on the deficiencies once you're riding exceeds the abilities of the settings and components you have.


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lol, yeah, hard to teach about superbike classes. The throttle is where it's at, but try to teach that alongside the pivot points by abstract writing. But a 12 year old trac rat on 250 would be informative for the noobs on g4 with all the wasted upgrades. :smile:

Again, throttle control is where it's at. You know the fast Asian guy in that tight course? All with the throttle.
 

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My goal is to get into A group this year for trackdays and i have 100% stock suspension with a baseline set-up/service from TSE.
I'm not worried one bit about it either.
 

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A lot of people saying mostly the same thing here, just all in different languages.

Scout you don't need a superbike class from Code. A couple of track days and paying attention will teach you a LOT. Also most of the country has AMA guys or other excellent riders that teach classes now and then. I for example attended one in Sofla a few years ago. I am guessing Niner is very familiar with the teacher of that class lol.
 

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My goal is to get into A group this year for trackdays and i have 100% stock suspension with a baseline set-up/service from TSE.
I'm not worried one bit about it either.
I rode for a year in b and a group completely stock. I wasn't happy with how the bike turned in to a corner, so i added the shims. Then I rode half of a year in A with the 6mm shims and the other half with a resprung revalved shock. I switched to the revalved resprung shock when i could feel the rear end not rebounding correctly and running wide on the exit of corners. Then i raced last season, with the same setup. The stock suspension is more than capable.

Brandon: you posed the initial question, what are your goals with your riding and the bike?
 
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