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Discussion Starter #1
Has anybody had any experience in what steel rear sprockets actually are lighter than stock? I haven't been able to really find any good info online, youd think there would have been someone who actually compared different brands for this stuff. Aluminium is not really an option for me and if like to shave a little weight in the drivetrain. Not gonna swap to 520 just yet, may as well run the 525 chain till it's due.
 

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If you are not going to swap to 520 then why are you even entertaining the idea of lighter weight anything...


You guys make motorcycling way too hard.
 

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I think after I read LDH's write-up on his site about sprockets is when I ultimately decided that a steel sprocket will suit me just fine for street riding.

Hell, in my opinion only way I see lighter sprockets being beneficial would be if you're racing and at that point might as well get a 520 setup.
 

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Hey Victors, I get what you're attempting to do here, but let's lay this out logically.

You've already written of the most easiest and simplest ways to proceed with the best results. You've said no aluminum, no 520 conversion, and not stock. So the difference in the steel options are likely only to save you a fraction of an ounce. And that small of a size would mean the rotational weight savings are negligible at best.

Given those limitations, find the smallest size sprocket to shorten the rotational weight and just drill a bunch of lightening holes in which ever one you can find the cheapest! :badteeth: Oh, and stay far away from Supersprox.
 

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I ride a Yamaha 2010 Yz450 dirt bike used for motorcross only, I run a steel front sprocket and a stainless steel rear sprocket. Never affected me negatively . I used to go through two sets of aluminum sprockets a year on the dirtbike. Now with the stainless steel sprocket, three years and minimal wear. You have to replace your chain before you replace the sprockets. We are talking at 250 pound bike wet weight. That's essentially half of our street bike weight. I wouldn't get hung up on a little weight.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Hey Victors, I get what you're attempting to do here, but let's lay this out logically.

You've already written of the most easiest and simplest ways to proceed with the best results. You've said no aluminum, no 520 conversion, and not stock. So the difference in the steel options are likely only to save you a fraction of an ounce. And that small of a size would mean the rotational weight savings are negligible at best.

Given those limitations, find the smallest size sprocket to shorten the rotational weight and just drill a bunch of lightening holes in which ever one you can find the cheapest! :badteeth: Oh, and stay far away from Supersprox.
Yeah, I can't expect people to get what im trying to here. I have a limitation that i havw to stay within for what im doing lol

Anyone know what the stock gen 4/5 Sprocket weighs?
 

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Yeah, I can't expect people to get what im trying to here. I have a limitation that i havw to stay within for what im doing lol

Anyone know what the stock gen 4/5 Sprocket weighs?
Not off the top of my head I don't. But I have a stock rear sprocket in the toolbox at home and can measure it up tonight for you if you don't get a response before that.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Not off the top of my head I don't. But I have a stock rear sprocket in the toolbox at home and can measure it up tonight for you if you don't get a response before that.
That would be awesome actually. I tried to find my gen 4 one but it's missing from my parts shelf.
 

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whoops
 

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Hey Victors, I get what you're attempting to do here, but let's lay this out logically.

You've already written of the most easiest and simplest ways to proceed with the best results. You've said no aluminum, no 520 conversion, and not stock. So the difference in the steel options are likely only to save you a fraction of an ounce. And that small of a size would mean the rotational weight savings are negligible at best.

Given those limitations, find the smallest size sprocket to shorten the rotational weight and just drill a bunch of lightening holes in which ever one you can find the cheapest! :badteeth: Oh, and stay far away from Supersprox.
What's wrong with Supersprox?
 

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What's wrong with Supersprox?
A lot. They are significantly heavier than a normal all-steel sprocket. That includes both the OEM sprocket as well as aftermarket ones. The fact that they rivet the steel teeth to an aluminum hub makes them more prone to failure as the rivets can break. At least one member on here had one fail in this exact way and caused significant damage to the bike and motor. On a high HP machine like ours, that's something to be concerned about.

About the only thing they have going for them is the 2-tone color. If you're into that sort of thing. But in terms of actually using the sprocket for it's intended use, there are a lot better and cheaper options available!
 

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A lot. They are significantly heavier than a normal all-steel sprocket. That includes both the OEM sprocket as well as aftermarket ones. The fact that they rivet the steel teeth to an aluminum hub makes them more prone to failure as the rivets can break. At least one member on here had one fail in this exact way and caused significant damage to the bike and motor. On a high HP machine like ours, that's something to be concerned about.

About the only thing they have going for them is the 2-tone color. If you're into that sort of thing. But in terms of actually using the sprocket for it's intended use, there are a lot better and cheaper options available!
Pretty sure one of them was Hells....Hellsrazor that is! I might buy a Vortex before a Supersprox, thats how bad, both belong in a melting cauldron though.
 

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Pretty sure one of them was Hells....Hellsrazor that is! I might buy a Vortex before a Supersprox, thats how bad, both belong in a melting cauldron though.
Yup, that's the guy! I didn't want to post his username since I didn't think that was necessary to make my point about them. But that's the one I was thinking about also!
 

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A lot. They are significantly heavier than a normal all-steel sprocket. That includes both the OEM sprocket as well as aftermarket ones. The fact that they rivet the steel teeth to an aluminum hub makes them more prone to failure as the rivets can break. At least one member on here had one fail in this exact way and caused significant damage to the bike and motor. On a high HP machine like ours, that's something to be concerned about.

About the only thing they have going for them is the 2-tone color. If you're into that sort of thing. But in terms of actually using the sprocket for it's intended use, there are a lot better and cheaper options available!
:dontknow: Who was that hellsrazor? He had the actual rivets break? Have you seen weight comparisons against conventional all steel sprockets you could point me to? I would appreciate it. iirc they have been used on all types of bikes successfully with even larger than 1000cc applications and when doing a search for failures I am not getting much for results.
 

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Yup, that's the guy! I didn't want to post his username since I didn't think that was necessary to make my point about them. But that's the one I was thinking about also!
I will have to look for the thread here I do remember something vaguely from quite a while ago
 

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Pretty sure one of them was Hells....Hellsrazor that is! I might buy a Vortex before a Supersprox, thats how bad, both belong in a melting cauldron though.
I keep hearing how bad the sprocket is. I just don't see much in the way of actual evidence to support that assertion. Heavy? OK. Heavier than aluminium for sure no one is doubting that as it is part steel. Heavier than all steel? Sure heavier than some of the new "ultralite" type ones but compared to a conventional oem type? Rivets can break sure just like teeth can shear off amongst other issues not exclusive to this sprocket. However I am not aware of a supersprox ever breaking at the rivets that are forged into the sprockets. Can anyone help me out here?

Now don't get me wrong hells is a cool dude I like him and it is not my intention to disparage him in any way but he is what I would consider especially hard on his bike. After searching through all the threads he started I cannot find the one specifically about the supersprox he ran, only previous posts in other threads that I posted in referencing the supersprox he destroyed. But I did find him smoking tires, rims, bearings, multiple sets and brands of sprockets, blowing up hubs, looping his bike, etc. Again not hating in the slightest but he has had issues with his bike that are not often repeated elsewhere due to his specific hard use.

So it is not my intention to threadjack but if there is good evidence out there that shows the rivets breaking or repeated failures I would appreciate a heads up and maybe some links? I own one of these sprockets and it still looks like new. It's fair to say that maybe that's not saying much but if I have a grenade waiting to happen I would appreciate the evidence. Help a brother out here people :badteeth:
 

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Discussion Starter #19
You can Google them and see how many people havw had issues. They also had a known issue with a line of their sprockets and still kept selling them. Supersprox is one company I'd avoid for sure.
 
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