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Discussion Starter #1
So I raced my 10R last season and my front brakes were not that great. I bled them and re-bled them and they never seemed to get much better. Then at the end of the season I decided to clean up front the brake pistons. So I take the calipers off like I usually do when I take the front wheel off. I put card board in between the pads and pump up the brakes I clean the pistons with water and alcohol and a Q-tip. I then push the pistons almost all the way in. I remount the calipers and pump them up. And viola, the brake lever is way stiff. And at the next race and practice the brakes were working great. Just a touch and they slowed me down.

I am using the stock calipers and master cylinder

Now over winter I decided to rebuild my front brake calipers. I usually do this at most once a year. So after I put them all back together with new seals and such I mount them on the bike and perform a standard bleed. I get to the point where the fluid coming out of the bleed hose is clear (without bubbles) at the calipers and at the master cylinder. And still the brakes are spongy and the lever comes almost all the way back to the handlebar. Hmmm. Then I remember my experience from last year when I actually got the brakes to work well. So I dismount the calipers pump them up with cardboard wedged in between the pads. Then push the pistons back into the calipers. I do this a few times on each caliper. I then mount calipers back on. I bleed the system. A sizeable amount of bubbles come out of each caliper. After bleeding each caliper and the master cylinder. The brakes are now great. The lever is very firm just like it was last year. So here is what I recommend when bleeding your front brakes on the 06-07 10R's.

1. First do a normal bleed. (if you are not sure how check out instructions on line or in the repair manual).
2. Then dismount a caliper one at a time.
3. Put card board or a thin wood shim in the pads so the calipers have something to press against then pump the front brake lever.
4. Push the pistons back into the calipers. You can push on the pads but be carefull not to gouge the pads. Do this a few times to each piston.
5. Remount caliper and repeat steps 2 - 4 above with the other caliper.
6. Re-bleed the front brake system.
7. Your brake lever should now be quite firm.

Note: When pushing the pistons back into the calipers you may want to remove the lid of the brake fluid reservoir and remove some fluid before you start. As pushing the pistons into the caliper will force fluid back into the reservoir.

Note: Wrapping a rag or two around the brake reservoir is a good idea to catch any spilled brake fluid

Note: Do not over tighten the bleed nipples.

Note: Always put the bleed nipple covers on when finished.

Note: Clean up seeping brake fluid from bleed nipples.

Final Note: I am wondering if maybe the design of the calipers is such that there are crevices that hold air and hence prevent the brakes from getting nice and firm. A standard bleed should take care of getting rid of air bubbles but it doesn't seem to on this system.
 

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yes you are correct about the crevices in the calipers where air gets trapped and won't come out unless you use the method you did.

congrats :thumbsup:

BD
 

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Custom Powder Coater
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yes you are correct about the crevices in the calipers where air gets trapped and won't come out unless you use the method you did.

congrats :thumbsup:

BD
:+1: My question is were do u get the new seals from for the pistons? I spoke to the local dealer and he wants $7 per gasket. the front calipers have 8 gaskets: 4 fluid seals and 4 dust seals. the back has 1 each :badteeth:

I will be powder coating them soon but $70 for the seals is crazy.
 

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Thanks a ton....my 7500 service is coming up and I was planning on cleaning up the front calipers anyway. Awesome info...thanks again.
 

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Hey booken thanx for the info i just put ss lines on my bike and still didnt feel right , this work awesome thnax again Rep sent
 

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La Flama Blanca
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Good on yah man, thanks! I will try it with the Nissins and see if it has any effect on them, my 04 still has the stock master as well, so I will have a couple of variables working
04 stock master with Nissin calipers
06 radial nissin master and nissin calipers
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I don't have the money for calipers and master cylinder this year. So I plan on racing with stocks this season. Plus I can race in more classes with my current setup.
 

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Thanks for the tips mate, I've gotta try this ; did my first track day on the '07 today, and after the Brembos on my old superbike, these brakes are friggin' woeful.

As an aside, when I've rebuilt calipers in the past, I've always found it beneficial to have the pistons all the way in before starting to put fluid in the system. I suppose it's obvious, but clearly the less air space you have in the caliper to start with, the easier the process is.

Cheers,
Brian
 

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Good heads up.

I've used a similar method myself. Where it differs is,I open the bleed nipple and use the pistons to force out the air by pushing it back into the caliper body. It has always worked well to get a good firm lever.

My old ZZR11 responded well to this tactic.
 

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I just did a track day at T hill and lost almost all My lever going into turn 5. With the stock fluid after 5 sessions the stock fluid boiled got to hot i had to pull the lever all the way to the grip to get it stopped as I ran off track. Went to the pits added new fluid bled and got better lever feel but not a lot so I'll give this a shot thanks
 

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Im installing my Galfer lines and bleeding as you described... Ive just got a concern/question. When reinstalling the calipers after the pistons have been pumped out and pushed in is there any procedure required to assure the pads are seated correctly? How do they stay the 1mm or whatever away from the rotor after I put the on and pump the lever?

Anybody know what Im tryin to get at? Does the pad to rotor clearance need adjusted? Are they self adjusting?
 

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I had my 12K service done by the dealer the other day, brake fluid was added that i read on the work report.
Anyway i didn't have time to question why i just got on and rode home as i was late to get kids from school.
Was a bit spongy as expected, but now after some riding it has firmed up nicely and has way better feel, response, and the lever does not travel as far back towards bar as before.
Go figure, they did something right.
 
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