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Discussion Starter #1
With the possibility of a 3rd-gen supercharger kit on the horizon, I'm trying to get a better understanding of the secondary fuel injectors' operation. The service manual does not get into specifics, so I'm left with the following questions...


When do the injectors turn on? Is it RPM based, TP based, or a combo of both?

Do the primary injectors increase in duty cycle throughout the entire rev range, or do they hold constant once the secondaries kick in?

Can the secondaries be successfully disabled and the bike run solely on the primaries (without throwing FI errors)?




If anyone has any experience with this, a little light shed would be greatly appreciated. The only other way to get answers is to pop an '08-up on the dyno and go to town with measurements and good 'ole trial & error.
 

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Whats the status of the gen I kit?? Is this kit mass produced? How many have you sold? How do they hold up wiht stock motors? Do the belts slip @ high rpm?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Production of the Gen-1 kit is on hold until I meet my pre-order quota of 5 kits -- I need to have some money in the bank to get the parts machined, and without pre-orders, I'll be sitting on some expensive inventory. Since the orders have been slow coming in thusfar, I'm trying to expand production to the 2nd & 3rd-gens, hence the question about the 3rd-gen fueling.

There is no belt slip with our kits as we use synchronous (toothed) belts. The kit is designed to work perfectly fine on a street ridden bike with pump gas (all pulls in our launch video [see below -- pulls start @ 1:20] were performed with pump gas and stock internals). The test bike encountered no detonation nor problems of any kind as I put it through our tuning torture test. The biggest key to keeping your engine alive and happy for a long time is running good gas and using your head while riding (that is, you can rip on it as hard as you like, but you can only stay in the boost for so long before the added heat of combustion starts wreaking havoc with the stock pistons/rings). We are still nowhere near the limit of the rods, crank, clutch, and the power is delivered so smoothly that the stock drivetrain components hold up remarkably well.





Still, anyone have some insight into the 3rd-gen fueling system?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks Mavis -- I scoured the service manual but couldn't find that info; that's what I needed to know.

As long as the primaries continue to deliver more fuel above 8000rpm (that is, their duty cycle still increases instead of remaining constant), then I can eliminate the secondaries, run bigger primaries (if need be), and still use a Power Commander to tune it all. Hell, even if they do hold a constant duty cycle, the PCV has a +250% range, so I'd have plenty of room to work with.

The biggest reason for wanting to eliminate the secondaries is I can then use the same airbox for all model years, which, if I end up making it out of carbon, will save a ton of money.
 

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Hi marvis
i can,t find this info either. We have converted a gen 3 to menthanol. We bought bigger injectors for primary side and moved the primaries up into a custom filter air box. We also switched to a factory ecm, from a power comander that we used on our gen 1 motor. What we experienced is even though the injectors are bigger than what we used on gen 1 we had to use considerable more fuel press to get it jetted right. We however did not have to change the secondary very much, we started them at 7000 rpm's. And the upper #'s looked real good. I thought it was because we only had a 30% up limit on the ecu but you bring cause for thought. Do you know of anyone with more info on this.
And thanks again for sending me your manual
bill
 
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