Kawasaki ZX-10R Forum banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
388 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Looking to hear from people that have had a Scotts or hyperpro dampener and let me know if they actually actively dampen ? the reason I ask is that at the track this last weekend I found if I kept my GPR at a lower setting the bike would steer great and make mid corner adjustments good, but would head shake hard out of corners (not a big problem, but one that had me take notice). And when I would turn it up the front end felt sluggish.

So what I'm wondering is if the Scotts or Hyperpro deliver on what they say, that they have basically a LOW & HIGH speed adjustments for there dampeners?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
609 Posts
If your GPR is not working properly, you can have it rebuilt for free if you have the receipt. Otherwise, it was only $25 last time I had it redone.

They can also use different weight fluids to suit your needs.

Have you confirmed you don't have a steering bearing issue or something? I rarely use a setting above "3", and have never had head shake.

The scotts does work a little differently than the GPR as it doesn't dampen on the return like the GPR. Some like this better, others hate it.

The HIGH and LOW speed circuits are not related to the speed of the bike. Both scotts and GPR support these, but GPR only has one adjustment for both.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
388 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Really just trying to figure out if these dampeners actually keep the steering light at regular bar input pressure/speed as in when steering into corners, but switch over to a harder dampening when input becomes more fierce (as in tank slappers). That's what the two separate dampening circuits are for, I just wonder if they do what they say, or if they feel more like a conventional single circuit dampener?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,971 Posts
Really just trying to figure out if these dampeners actually keep the steering light at regular bar input pressure/speed as in when steering into corners, but switch over to a harder dampening when input becomes more fierce (as in tank slappers). That's what the two separate dampening circuits are for, I just wonder if they do what they say, or if they feel more like a conventional single circuit dampener?
Yes i have the scotts/ohlins dampner and yes the high speed and low speed damper circuit works well. Thats what makes me a scotts fanatic... Ive always used them on my dirtbikes in the past.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
777 Posts
I have a scotts and think it works great. People say that dampers are a band aid for a bad suspension set up, but piss on that! I've ridden bikes with and without and the 1 gen needs one. I don;t think you can totally eliminate headshake on the track without losing too much feel, but you don't get the violent tankslappers, just a wiggle from the front getting light. Very easy to adjust on the fly as well. Steering is a little heavier at parking lot speeds, but unless you're doing gymkhana you won't notice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,976 Posts
Looking to hear from people that have had a Scotts or hyperpro dampener and let me know if they actually actively dampen ? the reason I ask is that at the track this last weekend I found if I kept my GPR at a lower setting the bike would steer great and make mid corner adjustments good, but would head shake hard out of corners (not a big problem, but one that had me take notice). And when I would turn it up the front end felt sluggish.

So what I'm wondering is if the Scotts or Hyperpro deliver on what they say, that they have basically a LOW & HIGH speed adjustments for there dampeners?

Haven't read through this thread to see what others are saying, But...

Scotts (or Ohlins rotary, it's the same damper with different logo's), has unique valve work. That gives it the wide range of function that no other damper has.

What that means is it does the job when you need the help, it doesn't interfer with restriction when you don't need the help.

Something you have to feel to appreciate, so just do it.
 

·
PostWhore
Joined
·
13,496 Posts
I had some pretty crazy tankslappers when I first got my '04. My head bearings were loose(which was very common on the '04's) so I tightened em up, and put a Scotts on it. Didn't ride it after tightening the bearings to see how much it helped so I can't say if it was fixed before putting the Scotts on there. But either way, Ive had no problem since then.

By the way, I guess Scotts finally started giving enough clearance to get your key in the ignition? lol When I put mine on, it was either mount it upside down, or shave the key down.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
629 Posts
I have a Scotts damper on my dirtbike and it's night and day how much more stable that bike feels when hitting ruts and roots at speed (things that would normally have knocked me off the bike due to heavy steering input by the object)

There are two different versions of the Scott's dampers a street and an offroad. I confirmed this the last time I called them a few weeks back. The street version has constant damping throughout the selected sweep angle, and the off road version dampens on deflection from center but not on the return. I was told you could use the offroad version on the street, but you just needed to turn up a few more clicks of damping.

If you are really curious how the high speed damping works, this is how I rather embarassingly demonstrated it to a friend.

I had my dirtbike up on lift so the front was off the ground. I had him turn the bars back and forth so he could notice that there was little to no resistance from the damper, even if you turned the bars quickly.

I then placed the bars at center and kicked the side of the front tire which made the wheel deflect a few degrees but in essence was almost rigid as the whole bike rotated a little on the stand.

I set the damper on the absolute lightest setting and kicked the side of the tire again fairly hard and again, the tire deflected minimally and the whole bike rotated as if the front forks were rigidly clamped from turning.

Not convinced he asked me to remove the damper completely, which I did, and this time when I kicked the side of the front the bars flopped over in the direction easily and quickly.

The embarrasing part? After I put the damper back on, and for the third time, kicked the side of the front tire, the bars didn't turn, as expected, but the bike fell off the stand and went crashing to the floor of the garage!

:lol:

We could both laugh because hey, it's a dirtbike... Now if I had done that with my ZX-10! :headshake
 

·
Licensed Dist of HaterAde
Joined
·
11,423 Posts
I had some pretty crazy tankslappers when I first got my '04. My head bearings were loose(which was very common on the '04's) so I tightened em up, and put a Scotts on it. Didn't ride it after tightening the bearings to see how much it helped so I can't say if it was fixed before putting the Scotts on there. But either way, Ive had no problem since then.

By the way, I guess Scotts finally started giving enough clearance to get your key in the ignition? lol When I put mine on, it was either mount it upside down, or shave the key down.
Scotts rules FTW......the key shave thing is actually in their installation book with diagrams even!!!! mine works just fine without it though..
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top