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You should be gradually working up to speed, especially in unfamiliar conditions, so that you simply don't enter corners at a speed that is grossly beyond what you or your bike can do. Overcooking the entrance or misjudging a line happens many times; part of finding out how much you can do involves finding out what's too much.
Lately, I have seen a lot of offs across different organizations because people haven't followed this approach.

To the OP there is some good advice given in this thread. Also, scout has brought up a good point as well. Get some books, Youtube, Ken Hill, Life at Lean, Motovudu and others all provide great information.

For me the more I ride track days, the more I understand the topics and can apply what I hear and read to the topic.

A good example is what was mentioned above entry to apex, apex to exit. Understanding the difference in corners and the techniques to apply to each corner is huge. When I started I just sent it, so to speak. In time I realized to get better I had to change and learn the techniques.

Showing interest is great, but I think you have to do several track days to start to understand what you don't know.
 

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Discussion Starter #23
Lately, I have seen a lot of offs across different organizations because people haven't followed this approach.



To the OP there is some good advice given in this thread. Also, scout has brought up a good point as well. Get some books, Youtube, Ken Hill, Life at Lean, Motovudu and others all provide great information.



For me the more I ride track days, the more I understand the topics and can apply what I hear and read to the topic.



A good example is what was mentioned above entry to apex, apex to exit. Understanding the difference in corners and the techniques to apply to each corner is huge. When I started I just sent it, so to speak. In time I realized to get better I had to change and learn the techniques.



Showing interest is great, but I think you have to do several track days to start to understand what you don't know.


I’ve been researching like no other. That’s what brought the initial question to mind. I understand though that as much research I do, once I get to the track it won’t matter much at all.

Instead of going all the way out to chuckwalla for the first day. I may just stay local and go to AMP (Arizona Motorsports Park) early next year.


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Go out in the local, deserted canyons and learn all these techniques. All of the track riding techniques apply in any good corner. I have plenty of places near my house to practice. Very few cars and very good roads. Mulholland was just newly paved a few weeks ago. It is a shame the place burned down last week. Have not been able to enter the local canyons due to the fires and people losing their homes.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
Go out in the local, deserted canyons and learn all these techniques. All of the track riding techniques apply in any good corner. I have plenty of places near my house to practice. Very few cars and very good roads. Mulholland was just newly paved a few weeks ago. It is a shame the place burned down last week. Have not been able to enter the local canyons due to the fires and people losing their homes.


Making plans with a couple buddies to ride through tortilla flats. It’s a very popular run and is really close to my house. It has been freshly paved as well. Just lacking the proper gear at the moment.


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After reading the rest of this, I have determined the real problem. Calm down. Stop researching. Put down the internet for a bit.

If you gotta do something, go ride your bike, practice braking. The rate that you should be pulling the brake lever is this: Open you hand, then slowly make a fist at about the rate of a "one one thousand". This will help you develop muscle memory and help keep you from stabbing the brakes and crashing.

Whatever you do, just be smooth. Slow is smooth, smooth is fast.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
YCRS, 100 points of grip - google it, it'll change your outlook on trail braking forever.



And your front tire is mounted backwards (or your rim is, and the tire is actually mounted correctly on the rim...)


it was backwards. Had it flipped this past weekend and tended to my chain and tire pressures.


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Palehorse, one other thing I would suggest to new trackday rider (who doesn't typically use tire warmers) is to run your tires a couple of pounds low, it'll help generate more heat in them and increase grip and feel. Not crazy low, just maybe a few lbs in each; then check them again as soon as you come in from a session, as they will have picked a couple of pounds back up from the increased temps (unless you are running nitrogen).
 

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Discussion Starter #30
Palehorse, one other thing I would suggest to new trackday rider (who doesn't typically use tire warmers) is to run your tires a couple of pounds low, it'll help generate more heat in them and increase grip and feel. Not crazy low, just maybe a few lbs in each; then check them again as soon as you come in from a session, as they will have picked a couple of pounds back up from the increased temps (unless you are running nitrogen).


Good god I wish I could change my name...awkward...


Yea, I’m pretty familiar with tire pressures and such. Currently I have it set to 36 psi front and 40 rear.

Something I’m not versed on is suspension tuning. Im sure there’s. Shop around here that can get my preload and damping set for my weight and such. I’ll get it sorted


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After reading the rest of this, I have determined the real problem. Calm down. Stop researching. Put down the internet for a bit.

If you gotta do something, go ride your bike, practice braking. The rate that you should be pulling the brake lever is this: Open you hand, then slowly make a fist at about the rate of a "one one thousand". This will help you develop muscle memory and help keep you from stabbing the brakes and crashing.

Whatever you do, just be smooth. Slow is smooth, smooth is fast.


I’ve out nearly, if not a thousand miles on it since I’ve gotten it. Have been riding her daily. I’d like to think I’m decent but until the coaches tell me what’s up I don’t really know.

For the most part I think I’m researched out until I get to the track and then ill figure it out.


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I’ve out nearly, if not a thousand miles on it since I’ve gotten it. Have been riding her daily. I’d like to think I’m decent but until the coaches tell me what’s up I don’t really know.

For the most part I think I’m researched out until I get to the track and then ill figure it out.


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Tips to make your first TD a win (A win is packing the bike up in the same condition it was unloaded)

- Leave your ego at the gate
- Be a sponge around the coaches and experienced track riders
- Leave your ego at the gate
- Get with the tire guy or the coaches and get a suggestion on a good starting point for your tire pressures
- Did I mention to leave your ego at the gate?
- Have the most amount of fun you've ever had on your bike
- Learn more about you and your bike in one day than you did in however many thousands of street miles
 

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Tips to make your first TD a win (A win is packing the bike up in the same condition it was unloaded)

- Leave your ego at the gate
- Be a sponge around the coaches and experienced track riders
- Leave your ego at the gate
- Get with the tire guy or the coaches and get a suggestion on a good starting point for your tire pressures
- Did I mention to leave your ego at the gate?
- Have the most amount of fun you've ever had on your bike
- Learn more about you and your bike in one day than you did in however many thousands of street miles
I dont ride track (yet) but this is what i also call a "good ride" or "good day". I came home alive and both me and the bike are as we were when we left the house. Even after a shitty ride i say this.

If i could add one thing, a couple people mentioned to look where you wanna go. If you can look as far ahead into turns i feel it helps with coming in too hot. Between this and starting slow and moving up, id say these are very important. Just dont go out there and try to go 110% out the gate. Listen and absorb like a sponge what the pro's are telling ya. Oh and if you dont target fixate you shouldnt have to spend time on the grass. Smoke that shit after the TD! :weed:

p.s. im always telling myself to Ride my Ride. Meaning only focus on what im doing, not riding over my head or trying to keep up.
 

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One thing that wasn't mentioned yet. On your "first" track day you will be in a novice class. This means you will typically start your day in a classroom. You will follow a coach the first couple sessions at a slow pace to learn track, lines, ref markers, etc.. You will be starting out slow no matter what. Then once they release you slowly up your pace! Best tip I can give is don't enter corners directly behind other riders. The slower riders will brake VERY early and could be a disaster. Give yourself an open lane on corner entry!

Also, once they release you don't go WFO. The speed you will be used to behind a coach is alot slower then what you will be used to if you hammer down your first opportunity. Track days pay nothing! So like others have said, take your time building pace, look as far ahead as possible, and of course have fun!

You will not be the fastest guy there! No one cares how fast or slow you are so take the time learning the track and getting technique consistent.

After this, next issue is a 2nd job to pay for tires, track time, parts, tires, and track time!
 

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Yea, I’m pretty familiar with tire pressures and such. Currently I have it set to 36 psi front and 40 rear.




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Holy bloody f***, that's not even close. You really need to talk to some expert level riders. If you are using the michelin 2CT's shown in your photos, you should be at 27 rear (cold) and 29 front (cold), these will warm up to 29-30 and 30-32 respectively. Add air to the front if you feel like it's understeering in corners, but god damn 40 PSI is riding on a cue ball.

DO NOT go by manufacturers recommended ratings, those are for street riding with a passenger considered.
 

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Discussion Starter #36
Holy bloody f***, that's not even close. You really need to talk to some expert level riders. If you are using the michelin 2CT's shown in your photos, you should be at 27 rear (cold) and 29 front (cold), these will warm up to 29-30 and 30-32 respectively. Add air to the front if you feel like it's understeering in corners, but god damn 40 PSI is riding on a cue ball.



DO NOT go by manufacturers recommended ratings, those are for street riding with a passenger considered.


I ride on the street and this is my first setting. I haven’t had the 10r long and will likely be changing them to see what feels the best. This won’t be my settings for the track.


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Discussion Starter #37
One thing that wasn't mentioned yet. On your "first" track day you will be in a novice class. This means you will typically start your day in a classroom. You will follow a coach the first couple sessions at a slow pace to learn track, lines, ref markers, etc.. You will be starting out slow no matter what. Then once they release you slowly up your pace! Best tip I can give is don't enter corners directly behind other riders. The slower riders will brake VERY early and could be a disaster. Give yourself an open lane on corner entry!



Also, once they release you don't go WFO. The speed you will be used to behind a coach is alot slower then what you will be used to if you hammer down your first opportunity. Track days pay nothing! So like others have said, take your time building pace, look as far ahead as possible, and of course have fun!



You will not be the fastest guy there! No one cares how fast or slow you are so take the time learning the track and getting technique consistent.



After this, next issue is a 2nd job to pay for tires, track time, parts, tires, and track time!


To be honest I’m not even going into it trying to be the fastest guy. I know I’ll be slow compared to vets on a 250 or 300. My goal is to learn the fundamentals, have fun and drool over the knee dragging pics I hope I’ll be able to achieve on day 1.


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listen to the first 12 podcasts:
https://soundcloud.com/user-962290250/sets/ken-hill-coaching-podcasts

read Sorry! Something went wrong!
read Sorry! Something went wrong!
read Sorry! Something went wrong!
watch Sorry! Something went wrong!

Few important tips for your first trackday:
get tire pressure right. Probably something like 29 rear / 31 front cold for most street tires (should see 3-4psi increase when you check immediately after pulling off track). See your local track tire vendor for correct cold temps that day.
after your first session, pay the local vendor $30-50 bucks for suspension setup (for the weekend if you want!)
get instruction, its free from the trackday provider and will have the most significant impact on your riding
don't throttle into turns. Don't throttle through turns. Generally brake to slowest part of corner, and gas away. If you overslow, do not add throttle, this is the easiest way to tuck the front.
do not add lean angle and throttle at the same time.
eyes up, scan. The further ahead you look the more information you have to stay calm. Don't get too far ahead and lose track of where you are. Look where you want to go, not at what you need to avoid (look through other riders, look toward the exit of the turn, etc)
stay loose, be smooth. you should be able to remove your inside hand from the bars while cornering.
Don't get upset when a kid on a 300 or 250 smokes you.
Don't panic brake. You can brake INTO a corner as long as you never let go of the brake lever. Do NOT "grab" the brake lever. DO NOT GRAB. Smoothly and gently apply brakes and you will be able to use them whenever you need to.
be safe, have fun, don't ride above your head.
 
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