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Discussion Starter #1
Most of the fast race / track people I have seen are running the Gen 4 rear wheel near the end of the adjustment range in the swingarm. What is the advantage of doing this other than wheelie control?

I'm running a 2011 Gen 4 with Ohlins TTX rear sprung for me with 6mm of shim, with the Attack link on Dunlop slicks (200/55). It's geared at 16/40 with a 525 setup and I'm thinking about going to to a 520 setup with 16/41 as it will be a little better for the tracks I ride. I'm currently running the rear wheel at about 1/3 of the adjustment range so I have lots of room to move it back. Since I'm considering a new drive kit, I'm contemplating if there is any advantage to making an adjustment to the rear wheel position

I ride at an expert club racer pace, and the bike seems to work really well. I don't have issues with wheelies. I'm concerned about trading off some transitional capability for the longer wheelbase, but also don't want to miss an opportunity to make the bike better. Of course I can try it both ways, but it's winter here in Michigan, and I'd also like to understand the "why" behind it being an improvement, if there is one to be had. Is it as simple as optimizing the weight bias?

Thanks for your thoughts and input.
 

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Im running swingarm 575-580mm, shock 312mm and forks top cap just above crown. Im in pro group but a couple of seconds behind the really fast pros. A good start but everything depends on riding style. I like a stable bike and beeing able to brake hard without the back wheel in the air.:unsure:
 

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There all relatively minor differences, but there differences that also reflect the current and often unique set up an individual already has, on the G4 when you move the axle back you are also actually raising the rear because the axle is an aperture which is not parallel to the deck. By raising the rear you are also changing the rake, the longer wheelbase actually and even though you have put more weight on the front improves rear braking as the point of rear wheel lift is farther away. Straight line stability not surprisingly is improved but you can also put more power on earlier coming out and brake harder going in!!! But by how much these points are altered depends on your current set up. Sadly a lot of us wont notice any difference but in truth given the vast possible combinations each individual bike can have means really you gotta try it.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the responses. Many people are running the forks flush in the triple with the axle all the way back. I'm running 2 mm to the top of the tube (7mm to top of cap). I also upped my spring rates on the front last year as the forks seemed to be running a little low mid-corner, and I was using all of the travel a little too easily in my view. Under hard trail braking the front would feel like it wanted to tuck, too. It's definitely better and I don't notice any negative difference to corner entry, or exit. The bike easily goes where I want it to go and I can push it harder.

It's a good point about the geometry change when moving the wheel back, but this can be managed with fork height / shock length. The moment arm becomes longer and the shock might feel more compliant. So depending on your weight, spring and link ratio, there could be an advantage here. I'm around 195lbs so probably on the heavier side. My swingarm length is around 570mm. The bike definitely tends toward the nervous side of things, but it is not unstable.

I'm not sure how much difference it would make under braking, but in theory it should be better. I tend to brake until I feel the back end moving around. Anyway, stuff to think about over the winter.
 

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Shorter wb the faster the turn; however, don't worry about this hair as far down the ability list, which begins with the rider.
 
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