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Discussion Starter #1
Hello, I am having a weird issue. I bought the bike in pieces. It had been the victim of a wheelie gone wrong. I put it back together. It runs fine except for the overheating. I have flushed the system. I have replaced the hoses. I have taken the time to burp it. I used a flushing chemical in it and did not realize it was supposed to be drain shortly after running it. I drained the chemical, flushed with tap water and put the new hoses on. Now I see a bit of oil sitting at the top of the coolant. It is like a few droplets. I was thinking I may have damaged the water-pump seal. But the overheating issue is driving me crazy. It does fine until I get on the freeway. Then it gets up around 225-244. It goes back down when I slow down. Also if I cut it off at the light it will increase in temperature then go down immediately after I get going. I know I am rambling, but there is a lot going on lol. I also took the oil filler cap off while it was running and there seemed to be air pushing out of it, like exhaust. I'm quite confused. Have experience with car, so I am able to fix it, I just need to know what is going on. I do not want to tear the thing apart for something minor. I have read through the forums, but mine seems to be unique.
 

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sounds like a failed headgasket.


"Also if I cut it off at the light it will increase in temperature then go down immediately after I get going. " this is normal....it gets heat soaked by the sensor, then the coolant flow brings it back to normal as flow returns.
 

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I agree it sounds like a head gasket, but when you say you bought it in pieces, did you assemble the engine if not what exactly do you mean? Is the fan working as it should?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Hello thank you for responding. I got in touch with a friend who sent info to his friend. He stated that due to pressure coming from the crankcase, I more than likely have bad rings. so I am now looking for another motor. I will put this in storage until I'm ready to build it.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
sounds like a failed headgasket.


"Also if I cut it off at the light it will increase in temperature then go down immediately after I get going. " this is normal....it gets heat soaked by the sensor, then the coolant flow brings it back to normal as flow returns.
Hello thank you for responding. I got in touch with a friend who sent info to his friend. He stated that due to pressure coming from the crankcase, I more than likely have bad rings. so I am now looking for another motor. I will put this in storage until I'm ready to build it.
 

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removing the oil filler cap with bike running will produce the pressure pumping results stated. no indication at all of ring seal/leakage. zx10 crankcase volume is limited, piston movement creates pressure pulses.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
removing the oil filler cap with bike running will produce the pressure pumping results stated. no indication at all of ring seal/leakage. zx10 crankcase volume is limited, piston movement creates pressure pulses.
I thought about that. I see no smoke, and there does not seem to be any loss of power. Like there is no smoke at all. and no oil consumption. Shoot I was ready to swap in a Gen 3 motor.
 

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Can you see bubbles in the over flow tank when blipping the throttle? Either way I think I would be stripping the head, if it just bought the bike I would be dropping the engine rather than just removing the head with engine in place.
 

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Howdy! Yeah sounds like a head gasket problem. And here's what you need to know about that...

The head gasket seals the combustion chamber from the cooling system and provides cooling around the cylinders. Water boils at 212 deg F under normal atmospheric pressure. You can make water boil at room temp if you lower the pressure. If you raise the pressure, water boils at higher temps. That's why a pressure cooker can cook your food quicker. The radiator cap is there to keep the pressure up in the system and prevent the water from boiling at 212 deg. It will boil at around 240 degrees though. Coolant provides anti-corrosion and anti-freeze properties to water. It doesn't raise the boiling point.

The bubbles you are seeing are likely the water boiling and have nothing to do with exhaust or anything in the system. Remember also that the cooling system isn't connected to the exhaust side. Smoke in the exhaust is related to the coolant being burned in the cylinder like the fuel is. But that's not a tell-tale sign itself and not the only thing you need to be looking for.

The system needs to be free of air so that the coolant can maintain pressure. Any air in the system and the pressure drops to atmospheric. If the coolant boils, air gets into the system. Any leaks in the system and air gets into the system. Once it boils, you're screwed. It's a runaway reaction at that point as it creates the air to keep the cycle going.

A split head gasket will allow coolant to enter the cylinder and cause smoke in the exhaust. A warped or deformed head gasket will seal feel fine until the head gets up to temp. Then a small opening is created in the gasket and the cylinder combustion pressure overwhelms the head gasket seal. Exhaust is pushed into the cooling system creating air in there, but coolant is not pulled back into the cylinder to cause the smoke in the exhaust.

So the fact that you're overheating, seeing it bubbling, not seeing smoke in the exhaust, and not seeing coolant in the oil or anywhere else doesn't mean anything. It is still likely to be the head gasket based on the symptoms you're describing. I've chanced the same thing down on my old ZX-7R with a ZX-9R motor in it doing the same thing. Replaced everything on that. The head gasket was the last thing to replace on it and it cured the issue. And the head gasket "looked" fine to the naked eye when it was removed. That doesn't mean it seals correctly though.

Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Howdy! Yeah sounds like a head gasket problem. And here's what you need to know about that...

The head gasket seals the combustion chamber from the cooling system and provides cooling around the cylinders. Water boils at 212 deg F under normal atmospheric pressure. You can make water boil at room temp if you lower the pressure. If you raise the pressure, water boils at higher temps. That's why a pressure cooker can cook your food quicker. The radiator cap is there to keep the pressure up in the system and prevent the water from boiling at 212 deg. It will boil at around 240 degrees though. Coolant provides anti-corrosion and anti-freeze properties to water. It doesn't raise the boiling point.

The bubbles you are seeing are likely the water boiling and have nothing to do with exhaust or anything in the system. Remember also that the cooling system isn't connected to the exhaust side. Smoke in the exhaust is related to the coolant being burned in the cylinder like the fuel is. But that's not a tell-tale sign itself and not the only thing you need to be looking for.

The system needs to be free of air so that the coolant can maintain pressure. Any air in the system and the pressure drops to atmospheric. If the coolant boils, air gets into the system. Any leaks in the system and air gets into the system. Once it boils, you're screwed. It's a runaway reaction at that point as it creates the air to keep the cycle going.

A split head gasket will allow coolant to enter the cylinder and cause smoke in the exhaust. A warped or deformed head gasket will seal feel fine until the head gets up to temp. Then a small opening is created in the gasket and the cylinder combustion pressure overwhelms the head gasket seal. Exhaust is pushed into the cooling system creating air in there, but coolant is not pulled back into the cylinder to cause the smoke in the exhaust.

So the fact that you're overheating, seeing it bubbling, not seeing smoke in the exhaust, and not seeing coolant in the oil or anywhere else doesn't mean anything. It is still likely to be the head gasket based on the symptoms you're describing. I've chanced the same thing down on my old ZX-7R with a ZX-9R motor in it doing the same thing. Replaced everything on that. The head gasket was the last thing to replace on it and it cured the issue. And the head gasket "looked" fine to the naked eye when it was removed. That doesn't mean it seals correctly though.

Good luck.
Oh man thank you so much. I will order the gasket. I was just worried about the pressure from the oil fill cap.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Howdy! Yeah sounds like a head gasket problem. And here's what you need to know about that...

The head gasket seals the combustion chamber from the cooling system and provides cooling around the cylinders. Water boils at 212 deg F under normal atmospheric pressure. You can make water boil at room temp if you lower the pressure. If you raise the pressure, water boils at higher temps. That's why a pressure cooker can cook your food quicker. The radiator cap is there to keep the pressure up in the system and prevent the water from boiling at 212 deg. It will boil at around 240 degrees though. Coolant provides anti-corrosion and anti-freeze properties to water. It doesn't raise the boiling point.

The bubbles you are seeing are likely the water boiling and have nothing to do with exhaust or anything in the system. Remember also that the cooling system isn't connected to the exhaust side. Smoke in the exhaust is related to the coolant being burned in the cylinder like the fuel is. But that's not a tell-tale sign itself and not the only thing you need to be looking for.

The system needs to be free of air so that the coolant can maintain pressure. Any air in the system and the pressure drops to atmospheric. If the coolant boils, air gets into the system. Any leaks in the system and air gets into the system. Once it boils, you're screwed. It's a runaway reaction at that point as it creates the air to keep the cycle going.

A split head gasket will allow coolant to enter the cylinder and cause smoke in the exhaust. A warped or deformed head gasket will seal feel fine until the head gets up to temp. Then a small opening is created in the gasket and the cylinder combustion pressure overwhelms the head gasket seal. Exhaust is pushed into the cooling system creating air in there, but coolant is not pulled back into the cylinder to cause the smoke in the exhaust.

So the fact that you're overheating, seeing it bubbling, not seeing smoke in the exhaust, and not seeing coolant in the oil or anywhere else doesn't mean anything. It is still likely to be the head gasket based on the symptoms you're describing. I've chanced the same thing down on my old ZX-7R with a ZX-9R motor in it doing the same thing. Replaced everything on that. The head gasket was the last thing to replace on it and it cured the issue. And the head gasket "looked" fine to the naked eye when it was removed. That doesn't mean it seals correctly though.

Good luck.
Also, can I go with an aftermarket HG or do I need to stick with stock? If aftermarket, then what brand and measurements?
 

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I've been running a Cometic HG for the past two years with no issues yet.

I think a few others have used them with no issues either.
 

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Also, can I go with an aftermarket HG or do I need to stick with stock? If aftermarket, then what brand and measurements?

You can use an aftermarket one if you want. I prefer the OEM. You're not going to see much of a difference in price between them. The gasket is around $100. You can go a bit thinner if you wanted to, but don't go much thinner without measuring your piston-to-valve clearance before you do. Quickest way to fix your issue is to get the OEM gasket, replace it, and ride.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
You can use an aftermarket one if you want. I prefer the OEM. You're not going to see much of a difference in price between them. The gasket is around $100. You can go a bit thinner if you wanted to, but don't go much thinner without measuring your piston-to-valve clearance before you do. Quickest way to fix your issue is to get the OEM gasket, replace it, and ride.
Will do, thank you for your help.
 
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