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Discussion Starter #1
A little background: in my early days of riding I had an incident where I came in (what I thought was) too hot into a right hand turn, panicked, locked it up, stood the bike up and went well into the other lane before regaining composure and re-initiating the turn.
about a year and a half later, a different bike, and a LOT of miles later, I had a similar incident except it was at a greater speed and I almost wound up in a ditch before I re-initiated the turn.
Since then I've never really felt comfortable at speeds in right hand turns. You could tell by the wear on my tires and my pace: I have a buddy w/ a 750 that I could run with pretty evenly (with my old 636) if the road had mostly left handers but if we turned around and went back he'd pull away pretty steadily the further into the curves we got.
SO... this summer i'm going to try and do a track day at VIR and since the courses are run clock wise, the majority of the turns are right handers. I'm wondering what can I do to try and overcome my bias (or apprehension)?
 

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A little background: in my early days of riding I had an incident where I came in (what I thought was) too hot into a right hand turn, panicked, locked it up, stood the bike up and went well into the other lane before regaining composure and re-initiating the turn.
about a year and a half later, a different bike, and a LOT of miles later, I had a similar incident except it was at a greater speed and I almost wound up in a ditch before I re-initiated the turn.
Since then I've never really felt comfortable at speeds in right hand turns. You could tell by the wear on my tires and my pace: I have a buddy w/ a 750 that I could run with pretty evenly (with my old 636) if the road had mostly left handers but if we turned around and went back he'd pull away pretty steadily the further into the curves we got.
SO... this summer i'm going to try and do a track day at VIR and since the courses are run clock wise, the majority of the turns are right handers. I'm wondering what can I do to try and overcome my bias (or apprehension)?

Give me a shout when you go out there, I know the main course like the back of my hand....i can give you some pointers....I guess the best advice that i got was if you think you are going to fast, lean it more...someone has made it faster.....
 

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lol that saying "someone has taken it faster" has gotten me into expert. It is definitely true! Practice your body positioning with the bike standing still. Body positioning not knee down none of that nonsense. When you do your track day, make sure you keep your self in check with the body positioning. Dont lean the bike, turn the bike does that make sense?
 

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A little background: in my early days of riding I had an incident where I came in (what I thought was) too hot into a right hand turn, panicked, locked it up, stood the bike up and went well into the other lane before regaining composure and re-initiating the turn.
about a year and a half later, a different bike, and a LOT of miles later, I had a similar incident except it was at a greater speed and I almost wound up in a ditch before I re-initiated the turn.
Since then I've never really felt comfortable at speeds in right hand turns. You could tell by the wear on my tires and my pace: I have a buddy w/ a 750 that I could run with pretty evenly (with my old 636) if the road had mostly left handers but if we turned around and went back he'd pull away pretty steadily the further into the curves we got.
SO... this summer i'm going to try and do a track day at VIR and since the courses are run clock wise, the majority of the turns are right handers. I'm wondering what can I do to try and overcome my bias (or apprehension)?


Your not alone. I know many people that have trouble with turning the bike in specific directions. I used to have the same problem, but I raced at a track (Willow Springs) that has all the fast corners as right turns. It took me along time to be able to dump the bike into a right turn without getting the death grip with the bars. I prolly have 10,000 + laps around that track now and I have no problems with right turns anymore. Its all about exposure to your weak points of riding. Practice , Practice .. :thumbsup:
 

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Something I just started noticing more as Im riding more track day and more LEISURE canyon runs, is that I favor left turns more than right. Why?? Perhaps because I am left handed?? After giving it much thought on and off the bike, I have been favoring left turns because I realized Im using more left arm for turning BOTH left and right. I dont know why I've been riding like this all these years. But I have been forcing my muscle memory to use more right hand/arm to turn the bike and its helping me tons!! Just my
2cents!! Good luck
 

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lol that saying "someone has taken it faster" has gotten me into expert. It is definitely true! Practice your body positioning with the bike standing still. Body positioning not knee down none of that nonsense. When you do your track day, make sure you keep your self in check with the body positioning. Dont lean the bike, turn the bike does that make sense?
Okay this aint even my thread and you lost me......... what do you mean by this?
 

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I think for you it may have a lot to do with where your eyes are focused. I say this because you are experienced and you know how to negotiate a turn, you just need a little tweaking. The next time you are out riding consciously think about where your eyes are focusing when you approach and come through the apex of a turn.

1. When you take left hand turn you are probably looking THROUGH the turn. You approach the turn and before you reach the apex you are focused through the turn and are preparing your body position/throttle position for the corner exit.

2. When you take right hand turn you are focused AT the turn. Your eyes are probably stuck on the road in front of you, directly in front of the bike. Your focus is on the turn not through the turn like a left harder. You are braking instead of accelerating and your body position is preventing the turn.

Hope you understand and this helps.
 

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Practice!!!!!! It does make perfect...
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks for the replies guys. A lot of what has been suggested does make sense and i will have to try and put it into practice once the weather breaks...
 
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