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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all!

It's been some time since we've been here, but we wanted to share with you a recent project we've been developing over the past 12 months, a 2018 ZX-10RR.

As is often our method, we got a little carried away with this one, but it's been a very rewarding challenge for us. The Kawasaki has special needs to get the most out of it's package and we learn more every week on how to better utilize it's strengths and diminish it's weaknesses.

Anyway - we'll begin at the beginning!


The first step was to get a brand new ZX-10RR, which we secured from our friend Ralph at Dal-Kawa in Hendersonville, NC.




Next, we lined up a whole bunch of parts!
























OEM cylinder head port.




For this bike, we are opting to use the Ohlins FGR superbike fork, which features technology seen in MotoGP, World Superbike and many other top championships. We custom valved and set them up to our specification.




Accompanying these are Beringer 108mm billet calipers, affixed with titanium pistons and magnetic pad-retaining inserts. We selected the 1200R7 pad compound for these.



 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
For wheels and brake discs, we selected OZ Gass RS-A wheels in forged aluminum, along with Braketech 330x6 ductile iron rotors in the front, our SBU rotors in the back and Zeta titanium rotor bolts to fasten everything.









We decided to add a little color to the Zeta bolts.









For brake lines, we opted for a custom set by CoreMoto that feature all titanium fittings, a data block for brake pressure and dry-break fittings from Staubli. The CoreMoto team delivered a fantastic set, built exactly to our spec. We're using Zeta race-spec titanium banjo bolts.






Out back, we're running a Zeta titanium axle, Lightech chain adjusters, one of our underslung 84mm caliper brackets, a Beringer 2D1 caliper, Fast Frank lifters and Fast Frank-converted captive caliper setup. Zeta fasteners keep everything together. Ignore the arm cover, that was temporary.





We replaced the OEM fairing stay and intake duct with an ultra light carbon fiber unit.




That dash is a little plain as well - we'll get to that later. A Lightech fuel cap replaces the OEM unit nicely.





Next up, we wrapped the airbox and underside of the fuel tank in gold foil. This is to minimize radiant heat negatively affecting fuel and intake temperatures.









We opted to start with a Graves full titanium exhaust system for this build, as well as Bonamici billet case savers. Attack Performance rearsets offer excellent quality, adjustability and feel.







 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Onto controls - We are using Domino XM2 throttles, coupled with checkered grips. This is an excellent kit that offers nice adjustability and feel. Very good build quality as well.

For brake master cylinders, we are using a Brembo RCS, as well as an IMA Complete Thumb Brake System, which replaces the OEM rear master cylinder with a billet unit and also provides a billet master up top. We are using a Zeta remote adjuster in conjunction with the RCS for lever adjustment on the fly.

We replaced the OEM clutch assembly with a fully adjustable Zeta 4 finger Flight Perch.

Attack Performance zero offset clip on handlebars and brake lever guard are also fitted.

Lastly, BSD handlebar button pods replace ugly OEM switch sets.







We're start with IMA custom triple clamps to attach the front end to our chassis.










We had to have some custom machining and parts made to fit everything with the superbike fork, but of course we knew this going in. We had a custom spec titanium axle, which we then milled to perfectly suit our needs.




First test fit is a success.




We briefly test fitted some carbon fiber bodywork for our planned winter test, but time ran a bit tight and it never got any seat time.



 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Next up, we decided to replace the dash with an AIM MXS Dash, which is also a comprehensive, professional grade data logging system. We are using an SE Composites carbon fiber dash protector to protect our investment. This was quite a bit of work, with custom subharnesses being required and some special coding. It was far from plug and play. We now have a much simpler and perhaps better solution available in the I2M Chrome Plus, which even offers sector-based rider aids and mapping adjustment.

















 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Back to the controls end of things, we've upgraded our RCS with a Zeta lever & Zeta titanium fasteners for a better feel, weight and look. These little details are what can really set a machine apart.






Motomaxx carbon fiber intake funnels were used to give us a nice bump in horsepower.




Next, we got our all-new Ohlins KA 468 TTX shock in and converted it to pneumatic preload, as seen on WSBK / MotoGP shocks.



 

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I just wish you guys had a bigger budget to REALLY see what's possible....
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I just wish you guys had a bigger budget to REALLY see what's possible....
Regarding the budget, you guys are a contributing factor there!


What would you like to see?

That dash looks tasty. Is it plug and play?
Also can you give any insight/comparison on the AIM versus I2M?
The AIM is far from plug and play and we still lost some functionality. The I2M is really a better solution. Plus the sector-based tuneability it offers is unparalleled. We just didn't have those back then.
 

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Regarding the budget, you guys are a contributing factor there!


What would you like to see?
Of course I was being slightly sarcastic, but truthfully no has seen a full MWR suite tested or even installed.

Can you guys look at the MWR XL Ram Intake, Matching Fairing Stay, WSBK Filter and new MWR Velocity stacks versus the stock setup?
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
super sick build ! is this for moto america ?
This one won't be run there.. but we may have something in the works for that. :wink2:

Ohlins and Beringer, because Showa and Brembo suck.......
We have had those brakes on an R1 race bike, they are very good. These Beringer units have proved to be quite good for us as well. The Westby Racing squad uses them and there is zero Beringer sponsorship involved there. We had the privilege of being at a test where they compared several top-level calipers, that is where we started looking at the performance per dollar of Beringer.

Those Showa forks are 100% unobtainable and exist only in the WSBK paddock. Those are probably utterly incredible, but a big part of what we're doing is building a proper machine that can be maintained and tuned in-house. We have a vast amount of resources in regards to Ohlins, so it's better for us and potential customers if we're on Ohlins. With that Showa fork, it would only be as good as the setting, which could be quite difficult to perfect without the proper resources.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
As we began wrapping things up, the next step was to install some Lightech carbon fiber frame & swingarm covers, as well as a Samco race coolant hose kit that unifies several individual hoses for a cleaner and more reliable system.

Also pictured is our Tightails subframe, which we powder coated black. This unit dropped about 2lbs off of the OEM setup.






As we began to prepare for the first official test for the bike, we finished tidying some things up and finished the fairing installation.









 

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Motomaxx carbon fiber intake funnels were used to give us a nice bump in horsepower.


There was a big thread on this board a couple of years ago about those Motomaxx velocity stacks. As I recall, everyone who tried them lost HP and then they were up for sale cheap. How did they work out for you?

Really appreciate you taking time to post all of this build, really amazing stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Motomaxx carbon fiber intake funnels were used to give us a nice bump in horsepower.


There was a big thread on this board a couple of years ago about those Motomaxx velocity stacks. As I recall, everyone who tried them lost HP and then they were up for sale cheap. How did they work out for you?

Really appreciate you taking time to post all of this build, really amazing stuff.
We made around 2hp up top on them. It did seem to negatively affect midrange a little, but we felt that was OK. Another thing, they MUST be seated correctly, you'll net terrible results without that. Their design leaves a bit to be desired in that regard, they can be installed improperly (not fully seated).

We'll be trying the MWR stacks next, another A-B-A style test.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
We had our first shakedown at Roebling Road Raceway, which was a great opportunity to find potential issues with our configuration and to make some setup changes. We tested several spring and geometry options and found a good baseline. We also had a small sensor issue, which was identified in data and resolved when we got back to the shop.



We next had an opportunity to run the bike at Barber Motorsports Park, with Sportbike Track Time, who we always enjoy riding with.



We immediately agreed that the OEM clutch was an issue and we prepared a Yoyodyne slipper for testing and install upon return. We felt the wear of the OE clutch was excessive to say the least, but that it was reasonably tuneable. We'd found a nice slip setting with the stock clutch using some custom-made shims, but the wear was rapid. We had good results with Yoyodyne on our Yamaha, although the adjustment is limited with this assembly.

Our black OZ Gass RS-A wheel set arrived as well.















One last shot of the 10RR with ti wheels (alongside our R1).

 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
In the next stage, we acquired several 'kit' parts. Some head gaskets, ZX-10RR specific camshafts, valve springs, cam sprockets, APE PRO manual cam chain tensioner and the usual replacement parts.















Degreeing in the camshafts after checking squish and piston to valve clearance.



Buttoned up:




Onto chassis development, we have been testing several components, including an array of 'cups' for the steering stem that alter rake or placement fore/aft of the stem in the steering head. These changes affect trail and handling characteristics and may allow us to run more optimal geometry to find a better balance for the motorcycle. In addition to those, we're also testing some rear linkages, in search for better grip and consistency.





Next, we've upgraded our old lithium battery to an Aliant YLP05 battery, which is perfect for 1000cc race use. It's smaller, lighter, more powerful and surprisingly less expensive than the Speedcell unit. We discovered these batteries were being used in championship-winning machines in World Superbike and British Superbike and had to give them a go. This thing is under 1lb and fires the 10RR right up! That said, we have a slave system, where we can quickly disconnect a larger battery (YLP14 in our case), after prolonged data or multiple starts are required. For most people, we suggest a YLP10 or 07.




Moving onto ergonomics, we got in our long-awaited SE Composites tank shrouds, which offer major enhancements in core support under braking and help tremendously with reducing rider fatigue. The also have the added benefit of looking great and protecting the fuel tank nicely.








Then comes the fun part! We had the opportunity to do some laps at Barber Motorsports Park with Sportbike Track Time. The test was very productive. Despite a relatively hot day and semi-greasy surface, we ran some reasonably fast times on our Pirelli slicks and the bike showed it has plenty of potential.








Shortly after, we put the bike to work doing some WERA racing at Roebling Road and Road Atlanta.







Despite achieving some podium finishes, we knew the bike was still not perfect. Finding the balance between corner entry and exit, as well as drive grip was our major focus.


As September came around, we decided to try out some new components. The first up was a new exhaust system by Arrow.







We were pleasantly surprised to find that it made very good power right away and we were quite impressed with the build quality and design.

 
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