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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Received my Dynojet O2 Optimizer/Eliminator yesterday, below are pics of what this mysterious device looks like and the instruction sheet that it comes with.

This device came via Serco who are the Australian Dynojet distributors. I have emails from Serco stating that this part is absolutely necessary if running a PCV on an Australian G4.

NB that the Australian G4 O2 Optimizer/Eliminator has a different part number to O2 Optimizer/Eliminators from Dynojet in the USA.







Sticker on the top side of the black box




Click to see installation instructions (yep, can't read the graph :()

Added new instructions sheet with legible range section:


A.
 

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Received my Dynojet O2 Optimizer/Eliminator yesterday, below are pics of what this mysterious device looks like and the instruction sheet that it comes with.

This device came via Serco who are the Australian Dynojet distributors. I have emails from Serco stating that this part is absolutely necessary if running a PCV on an Australian G4.

NB that the Australian G4 O2 Optimizer/Eliminator has a different part number to O2 Optimizer/Eliminators from Dynojet in the USA.

A.
Sooooooo........what happens if you don't have one?

I am running a PCV and Akropovic with a link pipe with no O2 optimiser.

It runs just fine.

I am mystified as to why this part exists.

If it is to get the last 2 - 5% performance then for those that need/want/can handle a few extra horses I can see the point.

But unless the pistons are going to melt or burst through the crankcase then why is it absolutely necessary?

Seriously, I would like to know why they insist it is so important, if anyone knows?
 

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Seriously, I would like to know why they insist it is so important, if anyone knows?
Here is a repost of mine from the other thread ARC was discussing this in.

"I run the 02 Optimiser.

From what I know your ECU tries to change your Air Fuel ratio at certain rpm's which helped to get the bikes past emissions testing.

The problem with that is that it effects performance and your Power Commander being a piggy back off the ECU deal, can't take control over that range.

The 02 Optimser will basically wire inline with your factory 02 sensor and should delete the ECU's ability to lean that area of the rpm out.

Ideally I think it should have been dyno'd with the 02 optimser on there but oh well, better late than never".


That thread is http://www.zx-10r.net/forum/showthread.php?t=115086

Your bike won't explode without it but you won't get the full benefit of your tuning capabillities without out.

:thumbsup:
 

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I have also come across some love in this area after some intense discussions with a multimeter and my old electronics text books.

It is possible to fool the ECU into thinking your sensor is still attached by building your own eliminator. This is nothing more than a 330ohm resistor in the right place.

This makes the ECU think the sensor is feeding it a zero voltage. So it doesn't try to play with the AF mix because it doesn't see anything move.

However, tuning needs to occur after this mod for best low end response. Never the less, by bridging the two white pins in the O2 sensor plug with a resistor you will definitely notice some more response down low, that should remain consistent.

This is all in theory so far... But I'll be putting it into practice tomorrow. I'll let you know how it pans out.


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The area affected by this is the closed-loop region, which is part throttle and lower revs. There's no need to run a rich air/fuel ratio down there. If the rider wants more power, they open the throttle and presto, it's not in the closed-loop region any more. Lean air/fuel in the cruising range will give better fuel consumption and keep the engine cleaner inside (less carbon build-up) and reduce fuel dilution in the oil. I also don't see the need for this ... unless the transition between closed-loop and open-loop is causing driveability problems. On two bikes that I've played with that have an O2 sensor and aftermarket fuel controllers (not this one) the transition between closed-loop and open-loop is absolutely seamless, even after changing stuff in the engine. No need for it.
 

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The area affected by this is the closed-loop region, which is part throttle and lower revs. There's no need to run a rich air/fuel ratio down there. If the rider wants more power, they open the throttle and presto, it's not in the closed-loop region any more. Lean air/fuel in the cruising range will give better fuel consumption and keep the engine cleaner inside (less carbon build-up) and reduce fuel dilution in the oil. I also don't see the need for this ... unless the transition between closed-loop and open-loop is causing driveability problems. On two bikes that I've played with that have an O2 sensor and aftermarket fuel controllers (not this one) the transition between closed-loop and open-loop is absolutely seamless, even after changing stuff in the engine. No need for it.
For your average road rider not chasing an optimum tune then yeah why bother but for those spending there money on a dyno tune that are seriously chasing the best results and want a smoother, easier bike to deal with down low then I'd stick an 02 Optimzer on there, get your bike dyno tuned and get the full benefit of what your paying for.

Why would you want your ECU mucking around with your AFR in anyway when you've paid good money to overide the ECU?

Personally I dont care about emissions or fuel economy, I want ridabillity even more so than outright hp and for me I did feel that my bike felt snatchy from closed throttle and abnormally fluffy in the bottom end. Put it this way the issues where enough for me to start searching for a fix to the issue and my tuner already new all about it.
 

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I have also come across some love in this area after some intense discussions with a multimeter and my old electronics text books.

It is possible to fool the ECU into thinking your sensor is still attached by building your own eliminator. This is nothing more than a 330ohm resistor in the right place.

This makes the ECU think the sensor is feeding it a zero voltage. So it doesn't try to play with the AF mix because it doesn't see anything move.

However, tuning needs to occur after this mod for best low end response. Never the less, by bridging the two white pins in the O2 sensor plug with a resistor you will definitely notice some more response down low, that should remain consistent.

This is all in theory so far... But I'll be putting it into practice tomorrow. I'll let you know how it pans out.


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Is it 330ohm or 10ohm?

I was reading another thread saying he used a 10ohm resistor between the white wires and bridged the other two left over wires.
Im about to do this mod and just a little confused regarding which resistor to use.

http://www.zx-10r.net/forum/showthread.php?t=114560
 

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The natural resistance of the sensor is 10 ohm cold, and about 14 ohm hot. Technically it wont matter if the resistance is higher than that of the original, it would only be an issue if it were lower. The signal the ECU receives in order to adjust AF has nothing to do with resistance... it is solely based on the voltage the o2 sensor sends back on the other 2 pins.

330ohm seems to be the consensus across most 3rd party eliminators, so im going to give that a go myself and see what happens.
 

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10 ohms was for the two grey heater wires - Caprice measured the resistance of the heater circuit and the 10 ohm resistor keeps the FI error code at bay. Not sure about the 330ohm resistor on the ECU signal though...

I've got an O2 optimiser coming with a PCV this week (hopefully!). Even though the O2 sensor is removed in mine, I will be using the optimiser table to neutralise any adjustments from whatever signal it’s currently getting.

Will update this thread with results

:screwy: unsane
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Never the less, by bridging the two white pins in the O2 sensor plug with a resistor you will definitely notice some more response down low, that should remain consistent.
What's really hard to see on the instructions is the range that is "closed loop", Serco sent me a better quality PDF which shows the area from 0-10% throttle at up to 7500 RPM stepping to 15% throttle at 4250 RPM and 20% throttle at 5750 RPM.

I think it would be tricky to get just this range via a resistor, I think there must be more to the black box than just some switches and a variable resistor.

...On two bikes that I've played with that have an O2 sensor and aftermarket fuel controllers (not this one) the transition between closed-loop and open-loop is absolutely seamless, even after changing stuff in the engine. No need for it.
Serco here are adamant that the Australian model absolutely requires this, my PCV hasn't arrived yet so I don't know how she will perform with and without the O2 Optiomizer. There were issues I believe, can't track down specific posts, with Australian models running without the optimizer.

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I wasn't able to get my PCV to do anything with out the O2 sensor, had it on the dyno a few times and with out would only ever pick up the standard map from the ECU?
 

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10 ohms was for the two grey heater wires - Caprice measured the resistance of the heater circuit and the 10 ohm resistor keeps the FI error code at bay. Not sure about the 330ohm resistor on the ECU signal though...

I've got an O2 optimiser coming with a PCV this week (hopefully!). Even though the O2 sensor is removed in mine, I will be using the optimiser table to neurtalise any adjustments from whatever siganl its currently getting.

Will update this thread with results

:screwy: unsane
yeah that's what i meant... not sure about the ECU wires, Ive read that some folks have directly bridged the two to complete the circuit...
 

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I think it would be tricky to get just this range via a resistor, I think there must be more to the black box than just some switches and a variable resistor.
Yeah the resistor just tricks the ECU into thinking that the sensor is there... and because the sensor isnt there, there is no change in signal to the ECU... so the ECU just locks to a specific A/F ratio from what I can gather...

This then allows you to build your map using the Bazzaz in my case, without the worry of the ECU changing anything... no sensor = no changes. Or at least this is where my research is leading me.

I believe your box actually controls the voltage or "smooths" the voltage that the sensor is putting out to make it optimal across the entire rev range in question... so its a bit more of an efficient way to keep things in check.

The old resistor across the pins is a bit of a bushmans way, but if tuning professionally its meant to keep everything safe from changes and allow your third party gear to pick up where the ECU leaves off.
 

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So how should i wire this?

10ohm between the white wires and 330ohm between the ground and signal?
Sorry, abit confused. Hahah
Basically, i just want to remove the O2 w/o getting any FI lights and without the ecu trying to change a tune when i get it dynoed.
 

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So how should i wire this?

10ohm between the white wires and 330ohm between the ground and signal?
Sorry, abit confused. Hahah
Basically, i just want to remove the O2 w/o getting any FI lights and without the ecu trying to change a tune when i get it dynoed.
I believe its resistor across the heating pins, and either nothing across the voltage pins, or just straight wire bridged across the voltage pins...

from what i read...

I found some info here...

http://www.furyforums.com/forum/fury-tech-performance-chat/10669-oxygen-sensors.html

and some here:

http://www.furyforums.com/forum/fury-tech-performance-chat/10669-oxygen-sensors.html
 

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Is it the 330ohm?
Can anyone confirm if the left over wires are bridged or left open? Thanks again guys, got this week to sort it out before my track day.
 

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Gday mike-b i joined the two white wires(heater) with a 10ohm resister and joined the black wire (signal) with the grey(earth) together but you must get a tune straight away or run a PCV Autotune but watch out the resister gets hot so put it somewere it wont burn stuff
 

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Gday mike-b i joined the two white wires(heater) with a 10ohm resister and joined the black wire (signal) with the grey(earth) together but you must get a tune straight away or run a PCV Autotune but watch out the resister gets hot so put it somewere it wont burn stuff
Gday caprice,
Thanks mate, doesnt matter if you use 330ohm or 10ohm aslong as its over 10ohm right?
Do i have to bridge the signal or ground?
What happens if you dont tune it asap?
 

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The heater on the o2 measures 8.5ohms so i use a 10ohm and joined the black and grey together(signal to earth) , ya will need a tune asap coz when i dyno'd it before i moded the o2 the mixtures were pretty close and after mod i noticed the auto tune adjusted it alot on cruise
 
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