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That’s a lot of power.

Jozef will be doing mine.

Im really just going to get the A/F ratio right, but will be happy with 150-155 hp with the current mods on the bike.
 

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I just did mine yesterday. Flushed out the antifreeze and added Engine Ice. Good idea on the squeezing the hoses to burp the system.

I flushed it out with 50/50 distilled water & distilled white vinegar.
Man, be careful using vinegar in your coolant system. If you have oxide style corrosion which is what all of it is, metal oxides ie rust is iron oxide and aluminum oxide is what we get in out engines, anyhow the oxide may still hold water and pressure but run some acidic stuff such as vinegar through it and there is a real chance that if any of the deposits were keeping everything sealed up, you will end up with a tiny leak of either coolant out or air in or both. Only say this cause I had it happen to me. Maybe not common but possible
 

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Now you tell me. Lol.

I flushed it again with just distilled water again after the 50/50 mix.

I think it should be fine.
 

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Anti-freeze does NOT raise the boiling point. It lowers the freezing point. The radiator cap it used to increase the pressure in the system which raises the boiling point. That's why it's called "antifreeze" and not "antiboil". Water boiling is pressure based, not temperature based. Lower the pressure far enough and the water will boil at room temp. Raise the pressure on it and you have to increase the temperature to make it boil. Think pressure cookers, longer cooking times in Denver, CO versus Florida, and that 6th grade science class.
Anti-freeze does raise the boiling point as does higher cap pressure. Glycol/water mix has a higher boiling point than pure water.

The boiling point of water at atmospheric pressure is 212* F , the boiling point of glycol is 386.6* F. Mixing the 2 raises the boiling point of the mixture. Consequently pure glycol freezes at 10.4* F but when mixed with water will lower that to about -49* F because of its colligative property.

One disadvantage to glycol/water mix is that glycol doesn't transfer heat as well as water. Others, in the case of ethylene glycol is its toxicity and slipperiness. Slick tracks with toxic spills are a no go. With Propylene glycol even though it is slick, it is non toxic so cleaning the spill isn't as big a deal.

Running pure water, with Water Wetter or the like, makes sense for a race bike because of it's much easier cleanup, better heat transfer, and likeliness of raised system pressures being addressed with closer maintenance [suspect hoses and cooling system components are more likely to be addressed].

I go back to my original statement that for a road bike running glycol/water makes the most sense. The cooling system is designed to operate with it and should have plenty of heat transfer capacity to handle thermal loading of the system even in hot weather.

Sent from my SM-G935R4 using Tapatalk
 

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Anti-freeze does raise the boiling point as does higher cap pressure. Glycol/water mix has a higher boiling point than pure water.

The boiling point of water at atmospheric pressure is 212* F , the boiling point of glycol is 386.6* F. Mixing the 2 raises the boiling point of the mixture. Consequently pure glycol freezes at 10.4* F but when mixed with water will lower that to about -49* F because of its colligative property.

One disadvantage to glycol/water mix is that glycol doesn't transfer heat as well as water. Others, in the case of ethylene glycol is its toxicity and slipperiness. Slick tracks with toxic spills are a no go. With Propylene glycol even though it is slick, it is non toxic so cleaning the spill isn't as big a deal.

Running pure water, with Water Wetter or the like, makes sense for a race bike because of it's much easier cleanup, better heat transfer, and likeliness of raised system pressures being addressed with closer maintenance [suspect hoses and cooling system components are more likely to be addressed].

I go back to my original statement that for a road bike running glycol/water makes the most sense. The cooling system is designed to operate with it and should have plenty of heat transfer capacity to handle thermal loading of the system even in hot weather.

Sent from my SM-G935R4 using Tapatalk
OK. I'll concede the point about antifreeze. Where I was going with my post was that the small temperature increase of antifreeze for a 50/50 glycol solution is not significant enough to be concerned about in regards to Older Guy's issue here. That's the reason they really don't advertise that. The pressure increase is the bigger factor for that and running straight water in a pressurized system will be no concern for overheating. But you are right about it though and I may have been a bit overzealous with my response.

While I also agree that a pure road bike with a careless owner shouldn't be running water alone, there are riders out there that are more contentious. Those will swap it for summer or winter use in areas that see prolonged freezes. Some riders in FL like me will run it year round because the 2 or 3 days it drops to 32*F won't be prolonged enough to freeze the motor that is the garage. Same kinda goes with Older Guy too since he's in CA. It's more about the guys that run their street bikes for the occasional trackday. Switch it out for the non-slippery, track-approved coolant at the start of the season and you don't need to worry about it until winter if you're in the northern states. I think Older Guy does trackdays on his streetbike which is why he did the swap and is now concerned about possible overheating. I do the same thing.
 

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Water boils at 212

Adding cap around +15psi raises boiling point around another +15 = 227 boiling point

Adding 50/50 anti freeze raises boiling point around another +15 = 242 boiling point.

Pure water conducts best, but keep in mind you don't have to add anti freeze at 50/50,
you could do less like 20/80, etc. Better cooling with some lowering of freezing point.
Need to look at chart to see actual freezing points.

Should use Filtered softened water and not Distilled. Distilled = bad.

Doubt you'll even reach 227 degrees, especially in temps as chilly as 94 degrees.
 

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Please explain why distilled water is bad and where to get softened water. I need to do a coolant flush this season and was planning on getting distilled water since it's so easy to find.

Thanks
 

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Use RO instead of Distilled. Grocery stores carry both.

If mixing with antifreeze doesn't matter. If mixing with a Water Wetter or similar product use RO.

The issue is distilling removes the minerals from the water and RO doesn't.

Without minerals in the coolant, it will pull minerals out of the surfaces it comes
in contact with.

A antifreeze mix will have enough minerals in it, so doesn't matter.
 

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Morning peoples so race season is officially on hold at the moment. So I swoped out the coolant to de-ionised water.

Any point changing it back over? It's in a garage not heated but I do run her on once a week on idle to warm her up to 63 degrees. As well as this running her through the gears at 2000rpm for less then a minute via paddock stand. (stand is safe and well grounded)

This is the link Halfords Battery Top-Up Water 5L | Halfords UK

Any thoughts? Much appreciated.
 

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If you live in Newport Beach do not worry about the freakin water in the engine.

Anti freeze lowers the freezing point and raises the boiling point.


Not by much but enough that many truck have the electric plug whatever to keep the engine from cracking due to frozen anti freeze and most engines have freeze plugs that fail before the engine cracks.
 

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I use Halfords de-ionised and water wetter with garaged bikes 3/4 of the year but those I ride on roads in winter I run conventional glycol antifreeze for the coldest months and just change it out again.
 

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So is it safe to leave the deionised water in there then? because that all that's in there no coolant or anything.

Otherwise am going to have to re swop with castrol coolant. Then re swop with deionised water in the next few months.

Am from the East midlands.
 

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So is it safe to leave the deionised water in there then? because that all that's in there no coolant or anything.

Otherwise am going to have to re swop with castrol coolant. Then re swop with deionised water in the next few months.

Am from the East midlands.
I wouldn't worry so much about deionized water as much as adding Water Wetter or the like to your system. Yes, softened water is best for sure.
 

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Thanks for that. That's way too much technical information for most of the readers here. :geek: :D So, here's the key takeaways:

TLDR; WaterWetter is a surfactant to reduce surface tension in liquids to allow greater heat dispersion.

Red Line WaterWetter® does not significantly increase the boiling point of water; however, increasing pressure will raise the boiling point.
However, using [WaterWetter] with distilled or deionized water will accomplish some scale removal in the cylinder head area. Plain water with or without WaterWetter® should not be used in cooling systems containing magnesium - antifreeze should be used -with WaterWetter®. For maximum temperature reductions use the most water and the least antifreeze possible to prevent freezing in your climate.
 

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Use RO instead of Distilled. Grocery stores carry both.

If mixing with antifreeze doesn't matter. If mixing with a Water Wetter or similar product use RO.

The issue is distilling removes the minerals from the water and RO doesn't.

Without minerals in the coolant, it will pull minerals out of the surfaces it comes
in contact with.

A antifreeze mix will have enough minerals in it, so doesn't matter.
So I grow hydroponics, I use ro water, my water ppm comes out at or below 15 ppm. I have gotten distilled water from the store with as high as 22ppm of TDS. Ro can and will produce water with a ppm of TDS down to 0. So will distilled. One just uses heat to accomplish this while the other uses an osmotic membrane. They will both Leach minerals and metals out of your system if used without premixing with something else. Water is the universal solvent. I run water wetter cause it has anti corrosive goodies in it. I live in California so it never freezes here and I don't need to worry about that. Just gets warm. If you live somewhere where it gets below 32 run some antifreeze plain and simple
 

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Discussion Starter #39
Interesting question....I have a zero water filter....can that be the same as ionized water?
 

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Discussion Starter #40
So I put Engine Ice in my bike and it runs cooler. However when I pull into my garage, and turn the engine off...with the key on...the temperature rises dramatically....seems like it's much quicker and higher than before. Is this normal? The fan stays on.
 
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