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Discussion Starter #1
Let me preface this by saying that my new (to me) '05 10r is the first motorcycle that I've ever owned. That being said, I've been lurking motorcycle forums, working on a kz650 restore, and assisting friends with minor work. I do understand most of what I'm reading about when I find information, but I don't always find specifically what I need.

Givens:
I will be doing the majority of my riding in a straight line at 55-80mph. I am NOT an aggressive rider, I bought the 10r because I know I will never be able to outride its performance. I live in Michigan where the best of roads have fairly large "buckles" perpendicular to the direction of travel. I am 5'10 195lbs. TO the best of my knowledge, all suspension parts are factory stock. I have about 200 miles (laughable, I know) under my belt on this bike, and another 400 on a cbr600 F4I.

So on to possibly irritating newbie questions:
1) What and how can I adjust my suspension so I stop getting airborne in traffic?
2) What tips can the experienced owners offer to help me set my own suspension to a safe/enjoyable feel?
3) I find myself about 1-1.5" short in the inseam to place feet firmly without getting overly fresh with the tank. Do I risk boogering up a perfectly good seat with an amateur attempt at shaving, or risk ruining suspension geometry by lowering the actual bike?
4) Is there anything AT ALL in the suspension that can help with massive amounts of drifting in crosswinds/truck drafts? These are elements I must deal with on every ride with the wide open fields and massive trucking lane on my commute. I have had some serious pucker moments coming out from beside a truck to immediately be blown over the rumble strips on the other side.

Apologies for the long winded questions, but none of the people I get to see in person ride sportbikes, and I feel like there's a wealth of knowledge here if the right questions are asked.
 

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When you know basicly nothing about bike.. i think you should see an expert in suspension to set it to your weight... suspension is what matter most on a bike..
 

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Discussion Starter #3
When you know basicly nothing about bike.. i think you should see an expert in suspension to set it to your weight... suspension is what matter most on a bike..
It's not that I know nothing. I came here to ask the people who I believe have probably learned how to do many things on their own. I'm sure I could go pay a professional large sums of money to do everything but ride it for me, but I don't really do that, and I don't believe it would benefit me. Don't think your opinion was not appreciated, as I did consider the same thing, I just want to do as much for MY bike as I can myself, even if it means asking some silly questions.
 

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i know !! but i learned that suspension is almost a science by itshelf! here you can have ajust you bike for 50 $... but to learn to setup you suspension properly you need to have a pro explaining everything to you ( i install ohlin on my track bike last week and the guys spend 2 hours with me explaining how to setup everything... ) thats why im saying that!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Well, at the risk of sounding harsh, is there anyone who hasn't been drinking that's willing to chime in?
 

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Well, at the risk of sounding harsh, is there anyone who hasn't been drinking that's willing to chime in?
I haven't had any yet tonight so I'll giver a go :badteeth:
If you have done any net searches at all on suspension the first thing you should see mentioned is sag. Adjusting sag can do a few things (like tell you if your springs are too hard or too soft), but the main points you want to accomplish are leaving some travel so the forks and shock can follow imperfections in the road and to help the bike to be balanced with you on it.

You really need two buddies to help you with this, one to take the measurements and notes and one to hold the bike upright with you on it. For a street ridden zx10r, you can use the sag numbers listed in the vid no problem. In the vid, he shows how to set rebound, compression is a little more of a personal choice. You may want to go firmer or softer but the ultimate goal is to get the front and the rear of the bike rising and falling in unison. This should help with one and two on your list.
 

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Dave Moss is the man, a legend in suspension knowledge... However, you can set sag yourself given his vids, or go to a local trackday and have them set it for you for $40. Sportbiketracktime.com usually has suspension gurus. Or get in touch with sportbiketrackgear.com and they can direct you at a good suspension shop
 

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Discussion Starter #8
RPG76, I wish there was a rep button, because that was the kind of reply I was looking for. I'm at work, so I'll check out the video when I get out.
Until then, for my curiosity, will adjusting the sag properly also change my seat height? I'm just a little more on my toes than I'd like to be, especially walking it backwards into parking spaces.
 

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RPG76, I wish there was a rep button, because that was the kind of reply I was looking for. I'm at work, so I'll check out the video when I get out.
Until then, for my curiosity, will adjusting the sag properly also change my seat height? I'm just a little more on my toes than I'd like to be, especially walking it backwards into parking spaces.
Well the 04-05 zx10 has pretty stiff springs, so it may change a little with the sag adjusted. It's probably just something you need to get used to.
 

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As already said, there's no substitute for a proper set up starting with correct sag front and rear. That being said, I would first check your current settings with stock (handbook) and reset to stock if different. This may help on its own.

I'm lighter and shorter than you, but I found my gen1 OK with a tad less preload on the shock. You could try backing off all the preload on the front and about 3 turns less on the rear and see how that feels. The standard suspension is pretty stiff and reducing preload will help with this and also lower the bike slightly. This should give you a starting point, but ideally get someone help you set the sag at some point before messing with the damping. :smile:
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I'm at a bit of a stopping point for now then, the only guy locally that I trust enough to help me mess with my motorcycle's suspension (my safety), is out of town for a few days. I appreciate the inputs, I'll be looking into all of it until then. I've decided not to lower the bike except as a result of correct set up. I can deal with the inconvenient parts, it's not a safety issue, just a parking lot/waiting at stop lights minor discomfort. Once I get some sort of actual riding ability I'll decide whether to mess with ride height. In the mean time, I'm trying to figure out how not to waste the outside 50% of my tires. Perhaps a question for a different thread?
 

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The quick and easy is getting a rear spring designed for your weight... factory spring is for 150LBS rider. (est. $100 for spring and 1 hour labor)

More than likely you have very little travel in the rear spring and thats the main reason for the harsh ride. Your front should be okay. I bet that spring is spun way down so you can see a lot of thread. All that thread is the additional travel you "Don't have".

Turn your compression adjustments to full soft for now... Your not hauling butt so you should be fine it will help soften the ride.

Check tire pressure... "I like 28psi in the front and 30 psi rear Pirellie".

You sound like a bright guy you will be fine takes time to get used to the bike...

Congrats on the bike...
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
Thanks. Any difference in what pressure different brand tires are best at? I'm running dunlop sportmax q2s. I do realize there's a spec for them, but tires specs are made by engineers, not necessarily riders.
 

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Thanks. Any difference in what pressure different brand tires are best at? I'm running dunlop sportmax q2s. I do realize there's a spec for them, but tires specs are made by engineers, not necessarily riders.
The specs are max load two up ridding...

Each tire and rider is different... I have never run the Q'2s.

Ultimately it's how they feel to you.

Michelin is a light weight tire so I run higher air pressure.

at 190LBS you will put heat into the tires faster than me at 170..

30 front and 32 rear is a good starting point.

Your best bet would be to change the rear spring... you will not get your sag range until you do that...

If money is tight just adjust the air pressure and look at the lines on the tripple tree. More lines that show the faster the bike turns. Less lines turn in will be slower...

There are a lot of adjustments on the bike...

Good luck
 

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Your best bet would be to change the rear spring... you will not get your sag range until you do that...
Gen 1 spring is not like 2-4, your good up till about 230 pounds.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Gen 1 spring is not like 2-4, your good up till about 230 pounds.
Racetech has a rear spring and a set of fork springs with various spring rates. I might have to look into who the local suspension gurus are and go make a visit. Hopefully they're cool and will show me what to do at home.

Anyone from MI know of anything respectable near Kalamazoo or Battle Creek?
 

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Gen 1 spring is not like 2-4, your good up till about 230 pounds.
The GEN III rear spring is very soft designed for a 150 lbs rider. The front springs will handle 200+ lbs rider... When I swapped out the rear spring the bike was 100% better. Stock was way to soft and I'm only 170 lbs. But I ride pretty hard and I ride fast...

I thought most rear springs would be built for 165lbs rider...

If the GEN I rear spring will handle a 230lbs rider you would still need to change it... that would be way to stiff for a 195lbs rider.

OP;

check out http://www.racetech.com/

See what they reccomend. I would not go crazy and spend a lot of money. Your not ridding that hard now. Just get that rear spring right and get the sag set. I like 35mm...

Good luck!
 
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