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Discussion Starter #1
I now hear a ticking noise that becomes more pronounced if I give it a little gas up to maybe 1.5 to 2k rpms, I can also distinctly hear it when engine braking. I assume this is the CCT - I'll go with that and mention it to the dealer.

The dealer will never believe me on this one -
Downshifting from from 2nd to 1st while my right foot is pressing on the rear brake, and I can feel the rear brake wiggle around with the shift lever. It doesn't happen all the time maybe a dozen times.... When it wiggles, it feels like the shift lever is connected to the rear brake, and the entire assembly is just going to fall off the bike o_O

Any thoughts on that?
 

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I would say cct. I have the 2016 as well and mine started right around 500 miles. Low rpm and engine braking just like you described. I've learned to live with it. Bike runs great and I love it.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I would say cct. I have the 2016 as well and mine started right around 500 miles. Low rpm and engine braking just like you described. I've learned to live with it. Bike runs great and I love it.
I agree probably CCT, but what about the other issue of the break lever wiggling around when I shift from 2nd to 1st - it's not a little movement, it's a lot. Seriously feels like there is a rod connecting the two levers, and the rod is not secured and the entire assembly will fall off.

Reminder that I have 6 years riding experience all seasons (including winter). I have beat the hell out of my CBR, and I've never experienced this before.
 

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I agree probably CCT, but what about the other issue of the break lever wiggling around when I shift from 2nd to 1st - it's not a little movement, it's a lot. Seriously feels like there is a rod connecting the two levers, and the rod is not secured and the entire assembly will fall off.

Reminder that I have 6 years riding experience all seasons (including winter). I have beat the hell out of my CBR, and I've never experienced this before.
The feeling in the brake lever is probably nothing to do with the brakes themselves. It's likely clutch shutter from the slipper clutch activating to limit the back-torgue to the wheel. Depending on what the Engine Braking settings are, how fast you're going when you're downshifting, and whether or not you have ABS on the bike, will determine how the rear brake feels. There's nothing mechanically linked and I think what you're feeling is a byproduct of the bike working against your technique. Downshifting form 2nd to 1st should be done at relatively low speeds to prevent this from happening and upsetting the chassis.
 

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Yep , it sounds like feedback from the slipper pulsing the lever.
 

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I now hear a ticking noise that becomes more pronounced if I give it a little gas up to maybe 1.5 to 2k rpms, I can also distinctly hear it when engine braking. I assume this is the CCT - I'll go with that and mention it to the dealer.

The dealer will never believe me on this one -
Downshifting from from 2nd to 1st while my right foot is pressing on the rear brake, and I can feel the rear brake wiggle around with the shift lever. It doesn't happen all the time maybe a dozen times.... When it wiggles, it feels like the shift lever is connected to the rear brake, and the entire assembly is just going to fall off the bike o_O

Any thoughts on that?
Sounds like CCT, this was a well known issue on Gen 4s. It may reset itself in the next few hundred miles, if it doesn't then manually reset it or get an APE manual tensioner.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The feeling in the brake lever is probably nothing to do with the brakes themselves. It's likely clutch shutter from the slipper clutch activating to limit the back-torgue to the wheel. Depending on what the Engine Braking settings are, how fast you're going when you're downshifting, and whether or not you have ABS on the bike, will determine how the rear brake feels. There's nothing mechanically linked and I think what you're feeling is a byproduct of the bike working against your technique. Downshifting form 2nd to 1st should be done at relatively low speeds to prevent this from happening and upsetting the chassis.
Yes, this bike has ABS, and when it occurs I am going slow, approaching a stop light for example, I'm not going fast, nor blipping the throttle, simply slowing down maybe 5 to 15 mph, and shifting into first. There's no way the slipper or ABS should be kicking in. Also I know it's not mechanically linked, but that's how it feels - there is some correlation between shifting into first and the rear brake lever reacting with it. Again this doesn't happen all the time - so far in over 300 miles I'm guestimating a dozen times.

Next time it happens i'm going to pull over and make a notes as to exactly what occurs. Also, I just checked my rear brake, and it is solid, doesn't wiggle around at all.
 

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Yes, this bike has ABS, and when it occurs I am going slow, approaching a stop light for example, I'm not going fast, nor blipping the throttle, simply slowing down maybe 5 to 15 mph, and shifting into first. There's no way the slipper or ABS should be kicking in. Also I know it's not mechanically linked, but that's how it feels - there is some correlation between shifting into first and the rear brake lever reacting with it. Again this doesn't happen all the time - so far in over 300 miles I'm guestimating a dozen times.

Next time it happens i'm going to pull over and make a notes as to exactly what occurs. Also, I just checked my rear brake, and it is solid, doesn't wiggle around at all.
Well, you'd be surprised at how low the slipper clutch will activate. Especially if you aren't rev matching and letting out the clutch at 15mph. I would most definitely expect some clutch feedback even at those speeds. Try rev matching properly even when downshifting to see if it changes the symptoms at all.

The ABS turns off automatically at 5mph and is inactive below that speed. If you're really mashing down on the rear brake when this transition is happening, you might be getting slight wheel hop or shutter as the ABS module change modes. That in turn would send more torque through the clutch which would activate the slip mechanism. Who knows. It's hard to tell what technique you're using in this condition and if that is contributing to the difference you're feeling.

Try blipping the throttle on the downshift to first. Also try using less rear brake when stopping. See if these things change the characteristics.
 

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There's no way the slipper or ABS should be kicking in.
Maybe ABS system is smart enough to reduce rear brake pressure (pulsating lever) even when wheel slip is not detected yet, but slip is PREDICTED because sudden deceleration is about to happen (2>1) and already braking.
 

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My initial is abs but idk as don't buy abs. Is this your first superbike? I ask as I never use the rear unless gotta stop fast situation.
 

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My initial is abs but idk as don't buy abs. Is this your first superbike? I ask as I never use the rear unless gotta stop fast situation.
Seems like many use rear these days. Seems to be taught that way unlike back in the day
 

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Discussion Starter #12
My initial is abs but idk as don't buy abs. Is this your first superbike? I ask as I never use the rear unless gotta stop fast situation.
Yeah, first 1000cc and first abs, and I use rear all the time on my 600 - just to settle the bike a bit, and help take some of the wear from the front brakes.
 
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