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Sweet thanks for posting the guide up for us man!
 

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Thats Gay!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


HAHAHAHAHA! Just kidding. :badteeth:

Good post and very clear directions.

A+ :eek:ccasion1
 

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kickazz thanks for throwing that together for us.
 

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Well done....
What determines the size of the resitor and placement? If using multiple LEDs where would you place them (on every two LEDs)? I noticed you have one resitor for two LEDs. If I was to continue adding more would it be one resistor two LEDs....one resistor two LEDs....and so on......
 

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Thanks Man.......
Just FYI, I had some blue LEDs mounted up on the back side of my pegs and got pulled over. I was told that I couldn't have blue LEDs on the bike. I was using the light as a light for my license plate but I'm guessing you can only have a white light for that.
 

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Ninja Dude said:
Well done....
What determines the size of the resitor and placement? If using multiple LEDs where would you place them (on every two LEDs)? I noticed you have one resitor for two LEDs. If I was to continue adding more would it be one resistor two LEDs....one resistor two LEDs....and so on......
The value of the resistor depends on the forward voltage drop of the LEDs, the number connected in series, and the desired operating current. For example, if you have four LEDs in series with an average forward voltage of 2.2V each, a generator output of 13.8V, and an intended operating current of 20 milliamps, you would need a 160-ohm resistor. You can put the resistor anywhere inline with the LEDs, but they must be connected (+) to (-) as shown. The longest lead of an LED is (+), and the (-) lead has a flat spot on the case adjacent to it.
 

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Cryptoman said:
The value of the resistor depends on the forward voltage drop of the LEDs, the number connected in series, and the desired operating current. For example, if you have four LEDs in series with an average forward voltage of 2.2V each, a generator output of 13.8V, and an intended operating current of 20 milliamps, you would need a 160-ohm resistor. You can put the resistor anywhere inline with the LEDs, but they must be connected (+) to (-) as shown. The longest lead of an LED is (+), and the (-) lead has a flat spot on the case adjacent to it.
Thanks Cryptoman, that info is a definite keeper. I had to cut and paste it along with the wiring diagram that kickazz posted.
 
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