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Great job out there Giya, fun watching some local guys out there!
 

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Discussion Starter #162
Cool news! Glad to hear you're living the dream! Keep at it and keep updating us along the way! Sounds like it will be a very rewarding time for you!

:wav:
Thanks! At this point, I am not sure if I'll be able to do any more Moto America rounds this year, as they're all out on the East Coast. The ADR/Fly Street Racing team had extended their invitation for me to join them and I was thinking that maybe the Grand Finale at Barber would be amazing to do. That said, I certainly didn't plan/budget for that--considering it's a 5000 mile round trip from California and costs involved escalate pretty quickly. The main issue is, this year the Moto America Sock 1000 class has gotten the short end of the stick by getting the least priority within the series. Unlike all other classes, Stock 1000 gets to race only once per weekend--preceded by only 3 short practice sessions--two of which are qualifying. So that's a lot of financial outlay and travel for basically 4 track outings on a track that I don't even know yet. So that's the conundrum. For now, I have 2 more local AFM rounds to get through so that's where the focus is at the moment.
 

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Thanks! At this point, I am not sure if I'll be able to do any more Moto America rounds this year, as they're all out on the East Coast. The ADR/Fly Street Racing team had extended their invitation for me to join them and I was thinking that maybe the Grand Finale at Barber would be amazing to do. That said, I certainly didn't plan/budget for that--considering it's a 5000 mile round trip from California and costs involved escalate pretty quickly. The main issue is, this year the Moto America Sock 1000 class has gotten the short end of the stick by getting the least priority within the series. Unlike all other classes, Stock 1000 gets to race only once per weekend--preceded by only 3 short practice sessions--two of which are qualifying. So that's a lot of financial outlay and travel for basically 4 track outings on a track that I don't even know yet. So that's the conundrum. For now, I have 2 more local AFM rounds to get through so that's where the focus is at the moment.

So, your dream of competing with the big boys in Moto America is being held back by money issues? Here's a thought....
www.gofundme.com

:lol: In all seriousness, I hope it all works out for you whichever way that goes. The simple fact that you got to do it at least once says a lot! That's the start of hopefully paving the way for more! If you can make it happen, great. If not, then go get 'em in the local events!
 

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Discussion Starter #164 (Edited)
A quick season-end update. So somehow at the last minute, I managed to pull off the final Moto America round at Barber. Aussie Dave Racing (ADR) team and I were able to work out a deal, where I could race their bike and get crew services from the team. This had really opened things up for me and made it possible since I didn't have to worry about any logistics and just fly in with my gear, swing my leg over a bike and go racing. Lucky for me, the ADR zx10r bike I got to race wasn't too far from my own bike, with only main difference being K-Tech suspension--as opposed to Ohlins. The team is supported by K-Tech so we had Lenny Albin providing invaluable suspension support. I told him my setup details and he tailored the bike for me--ahh yes, that pro life.

Since I've never been to Barber before, it was a steep learning curve figuring out the track within very limited track time Stock 1000 class offered. On Saturday, we had a 25 minute practice session at 9:30AM. We stayed out the entire session and managed about 12 laps and ended up in 1:39s. After a long wait came the Qualifying 1 session at 5:30PM. It was 35 minutes long so we got to run a little longer and managed 16 laps with a quick pit stop and dipped in to 1:35s. On Sunday, we had Qualifying 2 in the AM, it was another 35 minutes so we got a fresh rear tire and stayed out as long as possible to continue to learn the track. By the end, we qualified in P11 with time of 1:33. We put on a fresh set of tires, fueled the bike, checked everything over and were set to go at 4:30PM. As it happens at Barber, around 2:00 PM came rain. Not something I wanted to see but that's how it goes. Luckily, it was short lived and track was completely dry for the race.

We got a really good start and gained about 3 positions into turn 1. For some reason, the bike felt a bit different this time. It had affected my confidence, which caused me to give up a few positions by turn 4. The group I should have been fighting with had gained enough of a gap for me to lose touch so I was on my own. At half way point, Roi Holster had passed me into Charlotte's Web, which gave me a bit of "hurry-up." I chased him for a couple of laps and studied what he was doing better, which helped. I later realized that the whole weekend I didn't get a chance to follow anyone so it was very welcome information. I sat comfortably behind Roi and finally got him back into the same corner with 2-3 laps to go. I knew he wouldn't just let me have it so I tried to apply everything I knew and keep him behind me. Starting the last lap, I've noticed that I was catching the guy ahead of me but he was 5-6 seconds head. More motivation to push! By last corner, I was 0.3 seconds behind him. I tried my best to get the best drive possible and tuck all I could. Unfortunately, it was a close finish but I couldn't get him to the line and ended up in P10 with last lap being my fastest of the race--1:32:34.

Later on, it had occurred to me why I had a very different feeling with the bike early in the race. It turns out that the team had fueled my bike up to the top so naturally the bike felt heavier--but most importantly that I didn't get a chance to ride the bike with a full tank in any of the sessions. Truth is, I didn't really need all that extra fuel since the race was only 14 laps so 5/8th of a tank would have been enough and closer to what I was used to. Lesson learned there. In retrospect, I really wish there was one extra practice session as it would have likely gotten me on pace to be able to fight for top 7. But that's how it goes. We've learned a lot and have some very good data on Barber. It was a good enough result to be happy with the weekend and performance. I would certainly love to come back to do this round again next year--Barber is officially one of my favorite tracks.
 

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Discussion Starter #166
Great write-up! Barber is my home track and my favorite so far in the USA
It's a world-class circuit--hands down. The way it is laid out looks a lot like many famous, modern circuits in Europe. The run-off is top notch. The surface is 15 years old but it's still very good. I was told it will be repaved this winter. The only downside is lack of garages. I reckon that if it had garages, it could proudly host MotoGP.

Funny story, I got to the line to get my credential and found myself standing behind Toni Elias. I introduced myself and we chatted a little bit. He said that in his opinion Barber is better than most European tracks, which says a lot coming from a guy who had seen most top circuits in the world. I told him it was my first time at Barber and he gave me some tips--on what mainly not to do--the main one being "don't jump the curb under lean angle." Apparently that's what he did last year and it didn't pan out so well.
 

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Great read! I just attended Barber for the first time this year and I too am absolutely in love with the facility! So being that it was your first time, what part of the track did it take you the longest to learn? I struggled with entry speed into 1 (seems like a corner that you can hit faster each lap) and the 2nd to last turn before front stretch. Caught myself braking early way too often..

Just like to hear perspective from a more experienced rider.
 

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Discussion Starter #168
Great read! I just attended Barber for the first time this year and I too am absolutely in love with the facility! So being that it was your first time, what part of the track did it take you the longest to learn? I struggled with entry speed into 1 (seems like a corner that you can hit faster each lap) and the 2nd to last turn before front stretch. Caught myself braking early way too often..

Just like to hear perspective from a more experienced rider.
I think T1 is one that gets everyone initially because it's blind. I too started out easy into it and had to move my brake marker up constantly. Still, I probably could move it up even more. The last sector is where I found a lot of time in the race. The banking is good so you can carry so much roll speed through it, it's almost hard to imagine just looking at the track map. The other section that was a bit tricky is the first of the high-speed chicanes. Right after the museum corner. At first, I went to be brakes before turning into it but later saw people staying on the gas all the way to the first apex and going to the brakes while transitioning from left to right. That found me some time too.
 

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I think T1 is one that gets everyone initially because it's blind. I too started out easy into it and had to move my brake marker up constantly. Still, I probably could move it up even more. The last sector is where I found a lot of time in the race. The banking is good so you can carry so much roll speed through it, it's almost hard to imagine just looking at the track map. The other section that was a bit tricky is the first of the high-speed chicanes. Right after the museum corner. At first, I went to be brakes before turning into it but later saw people staying on the gas all the way to the first apex and going to the brakes while transitioning from left to right. That found me some time too.
You know funny you say that about the chicane. I was braking entering the first section and then rolled through out and my coach who evaluated me told me he was eating me up through there. Braking during the transition never even crossed my mind, huh. Just reading that and knowing how much corner speed I left on the track through the 2nd to last corner has got to be good for a sec or two! In the 2nd to last corner I also struggled to find a good reference point on the brakes. Do you remember seeing a good marker through that last section?

Thanks for the tips!
 

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Jumping the gator strip is the hardest thing to get the Novice School riders NOT to do. They all want to be a Pro Rider like you out there being a superstar and what they are really doing is just slowing themselves down as by the time their suspension settles so that they can initiate the turn after the jump they have lost A LOT of time. I always told them unless you are going so fast into the turn that you have no choice, but to jump the curbing then avoid it.

For the high speed chicane I was always on an underpowered bike so I learned how to get through it with the throttle pinned by short shifting into higher gears which reduced engine rpm and gyroscopic effect and then I just yanked the handlebars with upper body strength and let it drift all the way to the edge of the track on exit.
 

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Discussion Starter #171
You know funny you say that about the chicane. I was braking entering the first section and then rolled through out and my coach who evaluated me told me he was eating me up through there. Braking during the transition never even crossed my mind, huh. Just reading that and knowing how much corner speed I left on the track through the 2nd to last corner has got to be good for a sec or two! In the 2nd to last corner I also struggled to find a good reference point on the brakes. Do you remember seeing a good marker through that last section?

Thanks for the tips!
Because the first high speed chicane is pretty long, the transition from left to right is not lightning fast so you use the time when the bike is upright to properly and safely go hard on the brakes. The second to last corner I struggled with reference points too and probably was most inconsistent with. I saw people take all sorts of lines through there and none were slow. I even asked Aussie Dave about it and even he said that he can't spot that corner consistently either and he's running 1:26s! I copied Roi Holsters' line in the race and it worked ok. I was trying to tie it with the placement with respect to the flag tower on the right but I don't think I quite got it down. Need more laps there.
 

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Jumping the gator strip is the hardest thing to get the Novice School riders NOT to do. They all want to be a Pro Rider like you out there being a superstar and what they are really doing is just slowing themselves down as by the time their suspension settles so that they can initiate the turn after the jump they have lost A LOT of time. I always told them unless you are going so fast into the turn that you have no choice, but to jump the curbing then avoid it.

For the high speed chicane I was always on an underpowered bike so I learned how to get through it with the throttle pinned by short shifting into higher gears which reduced engine rpm and gyroscopic effect and then I just yanked the handlebars with upper body strength and let it drift all the way to the edge of the track on exit.
Yea I won't lie, after studying tape before I attended Barber jumping the gator strip seemed to be the only line choice! However, I do recall thinking to myself many laps how I actually worked harder to ride over it then I needed to.. But I also made up alot of ground so to speak on other riders through that section. The high speed chicane was where I was told I am losing time. I do remember having to yank hard on the bars thru the transition but I also braked hard entering.. Rolling out and braking after first apex certainly seems like a faster approach! Man I would kill to ride with you guys and learn from you! Riding in the I group never allowed me to follow faster guys and now being in the A group I'm excited to follow and learn from some actual FAST guys!

Keep the tips coming boys!
 

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Discussion Starter #173
Jumping the gator strip is the hardest thing to get the Novice School riders NOT to do. They all want to be a Pro Rider like you out there being a superstar and what they are really doing is just slowing themselves down as by the time their suspension settles so that they can initiate the turn after the jump they have lost A LOT of time. I always told them unless you are going so fast into the turn that you have no choice, but to jump the curbing then avoid it.

For the high speed chicane I was always on an underpowered bike so I learned how to get through it with the throttle pinned by short shifting into higher gears which reduced engine rpm and gyroscopic effect and then I just yanked the handlebars with upper body strength and let it drift all the way to the edge of the track on exit.
Oh ya, I bet on an R3 the chicane is fun!
 
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