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Heres asn idea...Why don't you do a how-to on the MP ? I'm going to install mine and could use a how to
 

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I think he means you do a How-to post here in your thread or a video on the YouTube to demonstrate how to install the Motion Pro kit. It's rather straightforward but replacing the actual throttle cables I imagine will be the most arduous task.
 

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Discussion Starter #84
I think he means you do a How-to post here in your thread or a video on the YouTube to demonstrate how to install the Motion Pro kit. It's rather straightforward but replacing the actual throttle cables I imagine will be the most arduous task.
Oh I see. I really don't think there's anything special about doing it on the zx10 over any other relatively recent bike. I'll definitely keep an eye out for any gotchas and make a mention about it and provide pictures.
 

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Discussion Starter #85 (Edited)
So seeing how I only have a couple of days left before the weekend at Thunderhill, I decided that I better get on with the Motion Pro Rev2.1 throttle kit installation, as I know that something will come up. Taking everything off was pretty quick. You do need to take off the airbox and even then it's kind of hard to see where each cable goes. The cables didn't come lubed so that's not to miss. I didn't have the fancy cable lubricant Motion Pro sells so I sprayed wd40 inside the cables and used some nice Fuchs grease on exposed cable ends. Installation on the throttle bodies side was fairly painless although it was pretty difficult to see so it took some patience. Clip-on side, I had to relocate things a little bit to make sure it all fits. I had to make a new hole in the clip-on to move the accessory switch a bit higher. The grips that come with the kit are longer that stock and pretty much all aftermarket grips will be longer so that's pretty much standard. In the end, things actually fit much better together than they did before, even though the kit doesn't leave much wiggle room around the master brake cylinder. Put on the grips and safety wired them. Adjusted cable tension and it's ready to go.

A thing to note, Motion Pro has upgraded their throttle kits to version 2.1 on the fly. So when shopping, make sure to ask for 2.1, as it has a lightly more reinforced throttle tube for better longevity.

Overall, the job could take maybe an hour or two depending on if you have to mess around with fitment on the clip-on. I took a bit longer as I was trying to not rush it.

The Road Race Reel (orange), which is the whole point of this upgrade, has a noticeable shorter throw from Rifleman's 1/5 insert. The throttle now feels like a true race bike. The best part about this reel is that it's cam-like so initial roll-on should be gentler. We'll find out this weekend. :)

Also took a shot of the safety wire of my oil filer plug. Nothing fancy but functional.
 

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Discussion Starter #87 (Edited)

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Thta's odd, I thought the new kit came with PTFE lubed cables, are you sure that's how they were supposed to be?

The orange cam is the second most aggressive one right?

As I said, the only PITA with replacing throttle cables is attaching them to the throttle bodies but other than that it's straight-forward. That clipon looks like it's well organized and ready to go, looking forward to your feedback.
 

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Discussion Starter #90 (Edited)
Thta's odd, I thought the new kit came with PTFE lubed cables, are you sure that's how they were supposed to be?

The orange cam is the second most aggressive one right?

As I said, the only PITA with replacing throttle cables is attaching them to the throttle bodies but other than that it's straight-forward. That clipon looks like it's well organized and ready to go, looking forward to your feedback.
I watched a DYI video by Motion Pro and they said cables weren't lubed and to lube them so that was my guide. Speaking with an AMA mechanic, he said that he doesn't lube cables at all but those bikes don't have a long lifespan so go figure.

The Orange Cam (labelled RR for Road Race) is sort of unique because of its cam-like (oval) reel shape--unlike the rest of them in the kit. It allows for slow initial throttle opening and fast toward the top. So it's really the only reel that I would consider to use on the track.

When I was riding Laguna with Rifleman's 1/5, I have noticed that I wouldn't get to WOT as often as I should have; partly because I was being a pussy (let's face it :badteeth:) and also because of that extra throw distance and the time it takes to get there.

One of the issues with having some odd 180hp under your seat is that you have to be very smooth with the throttle roll-ons and with all the extra throw travel there may simply not be enough time to get to WOT comfortably in certain shorter sections of the track. That's where this reel would come in handy--at least in theory.

I am looking forward to finding it out this weekend along with my hope for a slightly less aggressive initial throttle response.
 

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The instructions say to put grease in the reel... If you didn't then I guess I won't worry about it. I have the motion pro cable lube
 

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Discussion Starter #95 (Edited)
So another great weekend of riding in the books. Thunderhill is such a joy to ride, especially on a big bike. It's wide and flowing and the surface is very grippy, even when it's colder. I have probably good ~50 days under my belt around that track and they're were all on 600/750 bikes; so this was my first time doing it on a liter bike proper. What a difference.

Got to meet Abo7maid in person (very cool dude!) and a few other great zx10 enthusiasts. Saw some excellent projects and got some awesome ideas to work on.

With respect to the throttle change I've made, the Motion Pro Rev2 kit made a noticeable difference and I am a fan, as I pretty much expected to be. While it shortened the throw and helped me be smoother with the roll-on, the very instant when power comes on is still abrupt but only in some cases and I've learned to manage it to the point that I no longer have to focus on it. If I were to refine it further, it would have to be done through an engine map update.

Another thing that I've noticed is that the bike naturally has quite a bit of engine braking, so much so that it caused a few rear end slides going into T14 and T3 when my rear tire was not up to full temp (way after downshifts were done). Once it was hot, no problems. Apparently that's a known characteristic of Gen4 clutch and I'm sure my 16/45 gearing didn't help that. There are a couple of mechanical hacks that you can do to improve things but I need to do more research on that.

Speaking of gearing, as my pace improved throughout the day, the gearing was asking to be taller. So next time I'll try to run 44 on the back and see how that goes.

Next weekend, another two days at Laguna! Temps will be in the low 60s so definitely gotta keep those tires hot.
 

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Lanister said:
Got to meet Abo7maid in person (very cool dude!)
Likewise brother. It w a good to meet you too. I looked for you in the pits a couple of times but couldn't find you. Must've been out riding.

Lanister said:
Another thing that I've noticed is that the bike naturally has quite a bit of engine braking, so much so that it caused a few rear end slides going into T14 and T3 when my rear tire was not up to full temp (way after downshifts were done). Once it was hot, no problems. Apparently that's a known characteristic of Gen4 clutch and I'm sure my 16/45 gearing didn't help that. There are a couple of mechanical hacks that you can do to improve things but I need to do more research on that.

Speaking of gearing, as my pace improved throughout the day, the gearing was asking to be taller. So next time I'll try to run 44 on the back and see how that goes.
Is your bike's ECU flashed? Flashing my ecu helped tremendously with engine Braking.

I am using -2/+3 and I think I am in absolute love with this gearing on Thunderhill. Finally I am up in 5th gear in the front straigh. What tires were you running? What pressures? I had no issues at all on the pirelli slicks.
 

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Discussion Starter #97
Likewise brother. It w a good to meet you too. I looked for you in the pits a couple of times but couldn't find you. Must've been out riding.
I was pitted at the back of the second bay of the second canopy. We were in different groups so you probably missed me because I was out, so you're right.


Is your bike's ECU flashed? Flashing my ecu helped tremendously with engine Braking.
Yes, my ECU is flashed by Archer and no complaints for the most part.

I am using -2/+3 and I think I am in absolute love with this gearing on Thunderhill. Finally I am up in 5th gear in the front straigh. What tires were you running? What pressures? I had no issues at all on the pirelli slicks.
-2+3 is more or less what I have going on and it's very nice to get to the top of 5th gear by the finish line. By the end of the day I was going into 6th for a short squirt, which I wasn't too keen on since it was a lot of work for not much gain. I'd rather have a taller 5th gear next time and it would probably help to keep the wheel down through 3rd-4th gears. That's where 44 or maybe even 43 rear would come in handy. I bought an extra rear wheel with a sprocket hub so I have it ready for a quick swap next time. For Laguna, I'm sure it will be 16/45 again.

What tires were you running? What pressures? I had no issues at all on the pirelli slicks.
I prefer Dunlops and last weekend I was running GP-A Pros. Medium front and Medium+ rear. 33 psi front and 23-24 psi rear (both hot). No complaints there. I have a few rear medium compound take-offs that I have amassed that I'll be chewing through this season but ultimately the KR451 dual compound rear slick is what I'll be running going forward.

What compound are your Pirelli slicks?
 

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Discussion Starter #98
Just in time to break my Monday blues, I got a delivery of the Woodcraft small spools and Kawasaki Race Kit (Replica) sprocket fin guard. Very happy with both, seamless installation. Used a bit of locktite on the threads to make sure I don't lose this baby. The guard comes with an extra hole pre-drilled in case you want to safety wire it, which I probably will until I can be sure the bolt won't go lose on me.

If you want to get one, go to this thread...(toward the end of it)

http://www.zx-10r.net/forum/f47/wtb-kawasaki-race-kit-chain-guard-254978-8.html
 

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Discussion Starter #99 (Edited)
There's just nothing quite like having back to back track day weekends. The forecast for last weekend at Laguna was in mid-60s but the weatherman was wrong. Both days ended up being absolutely beautiful and in high 70s to low 80s. Saturday late afternoon the wind off the Half Moon bay got pretty stiff and, despite the abundant sunshine, cooled the track so the grip levels dropped. This caught a few people out and put them in the dirt. That afternoon, I was happily running around on a 5 day old front Dunlop GP-A Pro (medium compound) but when I had a juicy front-end slide going into turn 5, I knew it was time for a new front. This time, I went with the US-made Dunlop front 7455 (Medium) compound slick. There's just nothing like getting a brand new front that was manufactured only 3 months ago. I called it a day and got to wrenching, as I wanted to do a number of changes to the bike before Sunday.

Besides the new front tire, I also needed a new set of brake pads. Having tried my friend's bike with Performance Friction (FPC) brake pads (.13 race compound) I knew these were the pads I had to try next. Paolo, the parts vendor at ForTheTrack had the pads in stock so I swapped those out as I re-installed the front wheel. The change was very positive and it improved my confidence under heavy braking. Thumbs-up there.

In addition to that, I changed down to 44 rear sprocket (from 45) to give it a go and also threw in my spare rear wheel with GPA medium compound take-off I had from my AFM racing days. Frankly, I was fearing that the Medium compound would tare under the liter bike but it held up perfectly and offered considerably better drive grip than the 4 day old Medium+ rear.

Sunday was even a better day, offering low 80s with a light breeze, which never turned into the squall we had on Saturday. With that, the confidence to push the bike kept going up and the chance to see if the changes I've made were of help.

The front tire was notably better (partly because it was new) but also because of its different profile, which was confidence inspiring for my taste.

The 44 sprocket, which I thought would make my drives off the corners worse has actually made the bike's power much more useful at nearly no expense of acceleration. I found myself fighting to keep the bike in line and on the ground less and going to WOT much more often. This sparked my curiosity to explore the 43 sprocket next and also to conclude that 45 rear sprocket is probably too short--unless you develop a custom map to make it more gentle. What's also of note is the effect of slightly abrupt initial throttle became less pronounced, which also helped make the bike be more friendly.

Going to smaller sprocket also meant that the wheel had to move back a little so the overall wheel-base of the bike got slightly longer. This is obviously inevitable so you simply have to cope with the change--even if it is pretty small. Lengthening of the wheel base usually comes at a cost of sacrifice in bike's ability to make tight turns while making it more stable in long sweepers. So while I noticed that turns 1, 4, 5, 9 and 10 felt fine, the bike was asking for more lean angle to make tight corners like Turns 2, 8-8-a (corkscrew), and 11. I saw that I had room to spare on my fork stroke so I dropped the front pre-load by 1 turn and it seems to have solved the problem. In essence, taking out pre-load makes the bike front compress with less force and, as we all know, when front is compressed, the bike's ability to turn improves. Less lean angle and still making my apexes without sacrificing speed is a win in my book.

By the end of Sunday, many people have packed up and left early, which made for some relatively clear track to enjoy with my friends. As my confidence grew, I felt I could push more and without any drama I ended up dipping into mid 1:35s. That was more or less my target for the weekend so mission accomplished.

Many little takeaways for myself to work on before the next Laguna weekend in May. Mostly on my riding but the bike will definitely see a few little changes as well. I'll post on those as I go.
 
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