Kawasaki ZX-10R Forum banner

1 - 20 of 33 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
186 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
They are pricy, but I will probably get more knowledge than I did in all of the local track day schools here is south Texas.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
186 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I will post footage when I get back. I just hope I can get some tips from someone here and hopefully see others perspective that have attended.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,805 Posts
I haven't attended YCRS, but I did attend quite a few schools put on by one of their coaches, Chris Peris. He used to run his own school at Inde after he stopped racing for Team Iron Horse BMW/Evan Steel Performance in AMA.

I actually preferred his schools since the class size were very small... and his wife made us sammiches :) Learned quite a bit every time I went.

I heard he signed on with YCRS and it looks like it's a year long deal as he has no track classes up on his website and only offers private lessons and track rentals for $1200. This is a little more than 2x what his classes used to cost but I'd gladly pay that for the track/instructor time for myself. Especially on Inde. That is a fun ass track. The facilities there are absolutely amazing as well. Enjoy your time out there! You'll have a blast.
 

·
Always On Mod
Joined
·
1,842 Posts
I will post footage when I get back. I just hope I can get some tips from someone here and hopefully see others perspective that have attended.
I'm excited for you, what a great learning opportunity!
They have a youtube page with a bunch of intro videos of what you'll be learning
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UTGmFG9sOno&list=PLX6NQNungleYhncVfEha7OvxHIyckEnmJ

Also, there is fastersafer.com created by Ken and Nick with a bunch of articles and videos on different aspects of riding.

There is another outfit, Rickdiculous Racing, that is run out here in CA, and I am signed up to learn from them on April 2nd:thumbsup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
186 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Sweet, thanks animal. I'll get on that as soon as I get home. Maybe I'll work my way into having a season like you had last year in the near future.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
186 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
I haven't attended YCRS, but I did attend quite a few schools put on by one of their coaches, Chris Peris. He used to run his own school at Inde after he stopped racing for Team Iron Horse BMW/Evan Steel Performance in AMA.

I actually preferred his schools since the class size were very small... and his wife made us sammiches :) Learned quite a bit every time I went.

I heard he signed on with YCRS and it looks like it's a year long deal as he has no track classes up on his website and only offers private lessons and track rentals for $1200. This is a little more than 2x what his classes used to cost but I'd gladly pay that for the track/instructor time for myself. Especially on Inde. That is a fun ass track. The facilities there are absolutely amazing as well. Enjoy your time out there! You'll have a blast.
Speaking of which...
I'll be having a third day one on one with Chris on the 18th. :) maybe another rider if they have anyone else do it. So far I'm the only one and I'm so excited. Thanks Anthony.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,667 Posts
So here is the deal, and I want you licensed racers and other track vets to chime in here.

We DON'T have to spend a grand or more to get a good educational experience at a track day and that's the message I'm throwing out here.

20 years ago there was Keith Code's California Superbike School and Reg Pridmore's CLASS, as far as really well-run, professional outfits. Both of those guys did an excellent job, every bit as good as Ienatsch and Hill or any of today's "elite" category of track day. I've been through Keith's and Reggie's programs several times at multiple racetracks and base this observation on personal experience.

The next big outfit to arrive was Freddie Spencer's High Performance Riding School and that was very very good, with Spencer himself instructing. I went through Freddie's program several times as well, and it was first-rate. However, in terms of teaching the average street rider a basic skill set, it was no better than the California Superbike School (CSS), and not a lot better than CLASS. I say CLASS winds up in a very close third place here (of a very good group) only because the curriculum of Freddie's and Keith's schools is somewhat better-developed. But all three are/were very good.

Let's face it, the average guy is not going to be able to spend $1000 on a riding school, plus transportation to New Jersey and lodging and so on. This is a vacation, folks, plain and simple, it's like a motorcycle retreat. It's not at all accessible to the people who need it most. That's fine, it's a free country but an expensive sport! So what do the rest of us do? (For the record, I attended all those schools by working out special deals for the most part so I'm just as average as the average guy and certainly cannot afford to go to YCRS any easier than the rest of us. I have to struggle to buy tires most of the time.)

Now we come to today's world, where track days and schools have sprouted up everywhere. The quality and safety of these schools is all over the place; some are very good, some are a crash-fest. But most of them have a LOT to offer the guy who's wanting to learn to ride better and safer. Most of them offer a beginner group and/or an instruction package for riders wanting it and most of these are worthwhile. In fact I would go so far as to say all of them that I've attended are worthwhile and have good instructors and care about their participants.

For example I am closer to an outfit called TrackXperience which runs schools in California and Nevada. They've got the standard three groups, slow, intermediate, and fast. They've also got a school you can sign up for at no extra charge, with classroom sessions running between track sessions where all kinds of techniques are discussed. This is true for most track days.

Just to follow the TrackXperience example, for one, I can say without any reservation it was extremely good. I can generally run any group I choose on my home tracks, from slow to fast (A, B, or C, or as some call it, Level 1, 2, or 3) but these days I like the slowest group because it's the same racetrack no matter which group you're in, and I have nothing more to prove at this point, I can run it as slow or fast as I want and work on specific techniques without worrying about hanging someone up who is trying to set the lap record (har har).

This lady, Jen, was the classroom instructor and she was straight on point. She knew the lines perfectly and knew a hell of a lot about motorcycle handling (she launched into a discussion of the physics of how crankshaft and countershaft location and gear selection affect how quick the bike turns, for example), and could ride very smoothly and very consistently. I know as I followed her around the track for a lot of laps, and we had some real fun playing tag. I was also able to have some really good discussions with a few of the other folks as well as learning a few things myself.

This whole deal comes in at less than $150 and to my way of thinking, having raced a season as a novice and having done some of these "premier" ($$$) schools, is that your local track day probably is just as good for the stuff that counts and only a tiny fraction of the cost.

Sure, it sounds really cool to spend time with champions and there is a premium to be had hearing things right from the champ's mouth, but then again we don't all have to learn physics from Albert Einstein or Stephen Hawking, do we? For those who want to pony up the dough, go for it.

But for the rest of us, don't think for a minute that your local track day isn't a good place to learn. There are lots of people who can and will help and a lot to learn for the guy who can curb his enthusiasm just a little bit and try to learn something new.

There may be some difference between YCRS and similar schools and your local track day but it's not worth the vast premium in cash layout. Everyone ought to attend one big bucks track day if they can, but the meat and potatoes is at your local track and with your local racing club. Try it if you haven't done so.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
186 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
I have done so, and it was terrible or here in south Texas, there was not a lot of teaching. There was little invested time into really improving riders skills. On the opposite I have came out worst from my local track days. By trying to do what they said. Went from a day paste lvl 2 to super slow and confused rider.
 

·
Always On Mod
Joined
·
1,842 Posts
Sweet, thanks animal. I'll get on that as soon as I get home. Maybe I'll work my way into having a season like you had last year in the near future.
:thumbsup: :cheers: that's the nicest compliment I've gotten in awhile.

So here is the deal, and I want you licensed racers and other track vets to chime in here.

We DON'T have to spend a grand or more to get a good educational experience at a track day and that's the message I'm throwing out here.
...
There may be some difference between YCRS and similar schools and your local track day but it's not worth the vast premium in cash layout. Everyone ought to attend one big bucks track day if they can, but the meat and potatoes is at your local track and with your local racing club. Try it if you haven't done so.
YCRS is the Freddie Spencer school rebranded.
It all depends what you're looking for. What is the rider/instructor ratio at some of the cheaper options? Who are the instructors and what qualifications do they have? Are they teaching just a basic curriculum, or working on specific aspects of your personal riding?

Why I signed up for RickDiculous is:
1) Scott Russell, Shane Turpin, Ken Hill are well accomplished racers, and have worked with some of the guys who are at the top now. They know how to teach correct techniques.
2) they have a guaranteed 1:2 rider to instructor ratio. There are only 10-12 people at the track that day so finding clear space is never an issue.
3) the basic curriculum and normal trackdays have gotten me this far, but $1k is less expensive than fixing the bike after 1 crash from trying to figure out how to go faster on my own

I agree with Hernando, seat time is definitely the key. Practicing the correct techniques and skills is the quickest and cheapest (aka less crashy) way to get faster and safer
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
186 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Scott Russell, Ken Hill, Nick and Chris are at YCRS. First two days I'm looking at a 3 to1 ratio, ⅓ day I have AMA start Chris all for myself.

My thoughts are the same I'll get about 14-16 saddle hours and I will gain tons of knowledge.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,667 Posts
I have done so, and it was terrible or here in south Texas, there was not a lot of teaching. There was little invested time into really improving riders skills. On the opposite I have came out worst from my local track days. By trying to do what they said. Went from a day paste lvl 2 to super slow and confused rider.
Aargh, sorry to hear that. Like I say some are a crash-fest and that sucks, like the other guy said, it is all about seat time (long as we don't just do the same thing over and over again).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,667 Posts
:thumbsup: :cheers: that's the nicest compliment I've gotten in awhile.



YCRS is the Freddie Spencer school rebranded.
It all depends what you're looking for. What is the rider/instructor ratio at some of the cheaper options? Who are the instructors and what qualifications do they have? Are they teaching just a basic curriculum, or working on specific aspects of your personal riding?

Why I signed up for RickDiculous is:
1) Scott Russell, Shane Turpin, Ken Hill are well accomplished racers, and have worked with some of the guys who are at the top now. They know how to teach correct techniques.
2) they have a guaranteed 1:2 rider to instructor ratio. There are only 10-12 people at the track that day so finding clear space is never an issue.
3) the basic curriculum and normal trackdays have gotten me this far, but $1k is less expensive than fixing the bike after 1 crash from trying to figure out how to go faster on my own

I agree with Hernando, seat time is definitely the key. Practicing the correct techniques and skills is the quickest and cheapest (aka less crashy) way to get faster and safer
Nick is there, Freddie is not. Not sure who else might be there, Jeff Haney was part of Freddie's deal in the beginning, too, and Jeff was terrific. Very easy-going but every bit the racer as anyone else, and a great intellect to boot.

Of course, Nick brings some of Freddie's curriculum along with him, and what he has learned, but Freddie's absence leaves a huge chasm of knowledge, and no matter how good Nick, or Ken, or anyone else is, none are Freddie.

I did notice that Nick's anecdote (in the video) about the top Grand Prix guy visualizing the racetrack was Kenny Roberts, not Freddie Spencer. But I can assure anyone interested that the anecdote in question has been attributed to Freddie for decades, and he used it in his own school, so I got a witness (or a few hundred). Visualization is a technique used by any good competitor anyway, Spencer has no lock on it. Maybe there is a shift in brand loyalty and allegiance due to Yamaha being the YCRS brand; funny though as Freddie's school in Europe is backed by Yamaha, yet the man retains an excellent relationship with Honda.

That said, none of us are trying to be Freddie, so we are much more likely to learn the key skills from Nick or someone more like us; Freddie is great for the insider war stories, the very esoteric racing stuff, and indeed he was fantastic as an instructor for the regular guy.

But the regular guy don't have $$$ to pay to hear Freddie's stories straight from Freddie. We can get most of Freddie's stories on Youtube these days anyway, LOL!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,164 Posts
I've raced 1.5 seasons at my local regional track and 3 nationals. I've never had a day of actual schooling. I paid $500 to go to a school that was just a waste of my time and money, it was far too basic. I would gladly (if I could) pay the $1000 to go to a school where I have one on one time with some of the fastest riders around. Going to a track day doesn't teach you squat if your at the point where your not dropping seconds off your PB lap time. Heck I can't even be bothered to do track days anymore (unless I'm learing a track for a race weekend) because there's such a varying degree of speed that you never really get to put together a full fast lap.

I haven't heard anything but good reviews about YCRS and again I'm very jealous. Maybe next year.
 

·
Chairman of the Board
Joined
·
16,051 Posts
Just to chime in on what White Fang said, I did the Jason DiSalvo stand alone 2 day Speed Acadamey. The trip total including hotel and travel expenses was over $1000.00. That was really more of a motorcycle vacation as mentioned. I mean I learned a ton and got faster for sure. To do lead/follow with guys like DiSalvo, Brian Stokes, Garrett Gerloff and Rhino Haddock was darn cool to. Its a great experiance. I cant really say that I might not learned as much at a local track day though. Most of the control riders are former or active racers and more than willing to do lead/follow and help with advise. They will film you from their bike with your camera if you like. Goodness know there are very fast guys there most days. Guys like Tim Hunt, Sean Dwyer and Stefano Mesa. If money were no issue though I would do the YCRS for sure. As mentioned its really about the experiance itself.
 
1 - 20 of 33 Posts
Top