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Discussion Starter #1
The following are the recommended settings for track riding that can be used as a starting point for chassis set-up. This data is based on a 132 pound rider, and settings may differ depending on track conditions, rider weight/size and riding style. These settings are recommendations only, so use them as a reference for finding your own ideal settings.

2004 MODEL YEAR
Preload- front STD:14mm; rear STD: 178mm
fork tube height- front STD: 0mm; rear --
Ride height adjustment (spacers)- Front --; rear STD: 3.2mm
Fork oil level- Front STD: 91mm; rear --
Rebound damping- Front STD: 9 clicks out; rear 2 1/4 turns out
Compression damping- front STD: 7 clicks out; rear 3 1/2 turns out

2005 MODEL YEAR
Preload- Front 16mm; rear STD: 178mm
Fork tube height- Front STD: 0mm
Ride height adjustment (spacers)- Front --; rear 0mm
Fork oil level- Front STD: 101mm; rear --
Rebound damping- Front 6 clicks out; rear STD: 1 3/4 turns out
Compression damping- Front 7 clicks out; rear STD: 3 turns out

*Note that the suspension of the 04 and 05 models are different. Using suspension settings for the incorrect year may result in a set-up with less than desireable handling characteristics.

Lowered front, raised rear set-up
Initial turn-in is improved but rear wheel traction is reduced. If the front is lowered too much, the bike will tend to oversteer, making it difficult to make a proper corner exit.

Lowered rear, raised front set-up
Initial turn-in is worse and it is difficult to hold an inside line, but rear wheel traction is good. Cornering performance from mid-corner to corner-exit may be better in some cases.

Note 1: If the fork tube height is more than 5mm above the steering head, the chassis stance will be significantly changed and may have a large influence on handling qualities. When determining the appropriate setting, it is best to change the fork tube height in small increments.

Note 2: Brake feel will change depending on fork oil level. If the oil level is too high, excessive loads will be placed on the tire, which can adversely effect brake feel. If this occurs, try lowering the oil level.

Note 3: To adjust the rear ride height, the spacers available in the race kit will be needed. If the rear ride height is raised more than 5mm over standard, the chassis attitude will be significantly changed and may have a large influence on handling. So it is best to select the appropriate rear ride height by making adjustment in small increments. If the ride height is raised too much, the initial action of the rear suspension may be softer, and while this may not affect corner entrance, it may caise the rear end to sag excessively in mid-corner or when exiting turns. If this occurs, increase the rear preload. Generally, if the rear ride height is increased by 1mm, the preload should also be increased 1mm.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
:dontknow:
 

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How about if you weight 180lbs geared!
 

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I'm trying to remember the last time I weighed 180 naked, let alone geared!
 

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Sheesh, I weigh the better part of twice that!

For the 2004 model, most of the settings are the standard; what's with that?? Although I'm not track-riding this bike, there's no way the standard settings would be what I would want - too stiff, and that's with my fat arse on the bike. The top-level racers that I'm aware of that rode this bike, all changed to aftermarket shock, plus different springs and Ohlins valving in the forks (mandatory to keep the external part of the forks stock according to rulebook for this series, but the internals can be changed). The stock components aren't valved correctly for racing conditions.

I agree totally with their subjective comments on the direction and effect of ride-height adjustments on chassis attitude, though.

I'd like to know where this came from.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
GoFaster said:
I'd like to know where this came from.
I have friends on the inside.
 

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can your friends add 50lbs to themselves and then give you the inside scoop!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Its not like that. This is info straight from KHI. I have more info, but it looks like my info is no good. Sorry for the useless post.
 

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Supercharged Mod
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With most bikes, INCLUDING this one, the correct way to set up the stock suspension for circuit racing is to chuck out as much of the stock suspension as the rules will allow, and install different stuff that's valved correctly and with the proper spring rates!
 

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see, that is all jibberish to me, i would rather try to make what is on the bike work b/c i don't feel like dripping $4k on suspension. If i can dial my bike in to 90% or better, thats good enough for me. Maybe some of you 180ish guys that have adjusted the stock stuff can tell us how yours is setup.
 

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Supercharged Mod
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Same here. I'm not roadracing this bike, so I am leaving the stock stuff in there. It's just that they are making a recommendation for racing when the *real* recommendation is to go spend the big bucks!

I weigh about 100 kg. I have front preload backed out to 8th line, front forks slid up 3mm in the clamps, rear preload stock, rear ride height stock. I don't recall the damping settings that I settled on, it's on a sheet at home, but if I remember right, it's less compression damping and the same or more rebound damping than stock, at both ends.

Keep in mind that my setup is a street-riding, bumpy-roads setup. I need compliance to give the wheels a fighting chance of staying in contact with the road at a normal to mildly-fast street riding pace. Balls-to-the-walls, knee-on-ground needs smoother pavement (or on-ramps, but I'm not into that) and probably stiffer settings.
 
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