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Discussion Starter #1
Tried to lower the temperature at which the fan are triggered.

Because I put a thin head gasket and guess what the motor have a tendency to overheat. The fan triggered at 96 degree Celsius or 205 Fahrenheit and before it's go down the temperature could go as high as 216 Farhenheit (104 celsius).

So is there a way to triggered the fans (yes I do the second fan mod on a 2004) at lower temperature like maybe 90 degree celsius or 194 degree Farhenheit.

The signal of the sensor can be change electrically resistor or other way ?:wink2:
 

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ECU flash
 
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Discussion Starter #5
Well need to ship the ecu to USA and wait and wait....

There surely a way to set the temp at which the fan of radiator kick on ?
 

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Well need to ship the ecu to USA and wait and wait....

There surely a way to set the temp at which the fan of radiator kick on ?
On the new bikes, the ECU flash takes care of lowering the fan temp turn on temp. But that is with Woolich flashing gear and on the Gen 4 only that I'm aware of. Doubtful that you could flash the Gen 1 ECU for this feature.

Since the resistance of the temp sensor goes down as the heat goes up, there's not much you can do to fix that without building some sort of fancy conversion circuit on a circuit card or something. Way too much work. Adding resisters in-line or anything simple ain't gonna do it.

Easiest thing to do would be to wire up the second fan to a switch, in parallel with the ECU. That way either the fan could be turned on manually or the ECU could turn the stock fan on. And then wire the second fan to come on at the same time.

So, if you leave the switch off the ECU will kick the one OEM fan on at the stock point. But if you hit the aux switch, then both fans come on. Shouldn't be too difficult to do this, but chasing down a way to lower the turn-on temp is going to be wayyyy more difficult.
 

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Maybe I'm wrong, but 216f would not worry me.

As long as you are not boiling over you should be fine.

With what 18psi cap stock?, 50/50 coolant mix I think your
boil point should be around like 242f

Even if you start boiling over there's things you can do
to prevent it. Like changing coolant mixtures, getting a higher
psi rad cap, etc.

Is 216f bad?
 

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Maybe I'm wrong, but 216f would not worry me.

As long as you are not boiling over you should be fine.

With what 18psi cap stock?, 50/50 coolant mix I think your
boil point should be around like 242f

Even if you start boiling over there's things you can do
to prevent it. Like changing coolant mixtures, getting a higher
psi rad cap, etc.

Is 216f bad?
Getting the coolant temps up that high is likely an indication that the combustion temps are way up. I'd be somewhat worried about pre-ignition, cooking a valve, or warping a head. And getting that hot it will just drop your power some and singe the hairs on your nutsack when in traffic. :mrgreen:

I don't think the cap is 18psi stock though. I thought they were more in 14-15 psi range. That's not really as relevant though, because ultimately the boiling point should be right at the 240deg mark like you said. 216 degrees isn't bad, just uncomfortable. And switching up coolants is also a good suggestion.
 

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On the new bikes, the ECU flash takes care of lowering the fan temp turn on temp. But that is with Woolich flashing gear and on the Gen 4 only that I'm aware of. Doubtful that you could flash the Gen 1 ECU for this feature.

Since the resistance of the temp sensor goes down as the heat goes up, there's not much you can do to fix that without building some sort of fancy conversion circuit on a circuit card or something. Way too much work. Adding resisters in-line or anything simple ain't gonna do it.

Easiest thing to do would be to wire up the second fan to a switch, in parallel with the ECU. That way either the fan could be turned on manually or the ECU could turn the stock fan on. And then wire the second fan to come on at the same time.

So, if you leave the switch off the ECU will kick the one OEM fan on at the stock point. But if you hit the aux switch, then both fans come on. Shouldn't be too difficult to do this, but chasing down a way to lower the turn-on temp is going to be wayyyy more difficult.

Actually I have been thinking about this and believe it would be possible to do it with a simple resistor.

But as Sky points out since the resistance of the sensor goes down when the water temp goes up you would have to place the resistor in parallel with the sensor and not in line or in series with it.

Thus the idea would be to start up the bike cold and decide what temp you wanted to trigger at say 185* F instead of 205* F and when you see 185* temp on the gauge, unplug the sensor and measure the resistance to ground the sensor is showing. As an example say that's 150 Ohms at 185*. Then hook the sensor back up and wait till the engine warms till the fan turns on, unplug the sensor and measure the resistance again. Now say that's 40 ohms. (I'm just pulling these numbers out of my head as an example)

What you would do is select a resistor value then when added "in parallel" to the sensor that gives you 40 ohms instead of 150, it would then trigger the fan at a lower temp setting.

I'm sure I could test this, figure out what value of resistor would be needed added in parallel to the sensor to make it work, but since I use the Woolich flasher, someone more motivated will need to take over from here. :badteeth:
 
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