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How does the preload affect the ability to wheelie? :dontknow: Does it have any effect at all? I wonder if more makes a bike more wheelie prone or if less makes it more wheelie prone? I haven't really tried it on the ten because it is such a bitch to turn the preload collar.Any body have any Ideas about this?
 

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I don't know....

Having said that, I would think that the suspension settings can effect how easily the bike can be made to wheelie. For example, no rebound damping in the front end would let the weight transfer more easily to the rear. I don't know about rear preload. I understand that as you gas the bike, the rear suspension actually tries to extend due to the action of the chain and the angle of the swingarm. So I don't know how preload would effect things.
 

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yep your both right your no experts... :lol:
preload shouldn't have much effect unless it's set up grossly wrong anyhow the compression damping though..that can make a difference..soften it up and the rear spring will compress more easily. the 10 isn't the best wheelie nike I've ever owned.. the gsxr1000 was much easier to wheelie on in stock form.
 

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busaforhire said:
yep your both right your no experts... :lol:
preload shouldn't have much effect unless it's set up grossly wrong anyhow the compression damping though..that can make a difference..soften it up and the rear spring will compress more easily. the 10 isn't the best wheelie nike I've ever owned.. the gsxr1000 was much easier to wheelie on in stock form.

Didn't you just get your 10?

Perhaps you need more time before you make that opinion?

I find the 10 to be the easiest bike to wheelie that I have ever been on.
 

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crispin said:
Didn't you just get your 10?

Perhaps you need more time before you make that opinion?

I find the 10 to be the easiest bike to wheelie that I have ever been on.

then you need to wick up a gixxer 1000 at about 5000 in second.. my ten won't lift from there without some tugging..7-8000 maybe..
I've rode over 750 miles in less then a week on this bike...it don't wheelie if you don't want it to.. simple as that..

is you sprocket size different from stock?? if so i can see that it would wheeilie easier... i didn't say that it didn't wheelie good it's just not as easy as say a gsxr 1000 the zx doesn't have the low end that the suzuki does..
 

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crispin said:
Didn't you just get your 10?

Perhaps you need more time before you make that opinion?

I find the 10 to be the easiest bike to wheelie that I have ever been on.

by the way i see you have some nice mods done to your scoot.. what was the before and after gains you seen with your combo??
 

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busaforhire said:
yep your both right your no experts... :lol:
preload shouldn't have much effect unless it's set up grossly wrong anyhow the compression damping though..that can make a difference..soften it up and the rear spring will compress more easily. the 10 isn't the best wheelie nike I've ever owned.. the gsxr1000 was much easier to wheelie on in stock form.
Obviously, you belong in the no expert group as well. But your opinion is appreciated.

Ever watch a bike on a dyno. What does the rear suspension do when the bike is under load????
 

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zeta xray said:
Obviously, you belong in the no expert group as well. But your opinion is appreciated.

Ever watch a bike on a dyno. What does the rear suspension do when the bike is under load????

ughhh compresses...(some bikes much more then others)
 

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busaforhire said:
ughhh compresses...(some bikes much more then others)
Nope. Most standard bikes jack up in the back when under load on a dyno. They compress back down when the throttle is rolled off. This does not apply to bikes with non-standard geometry. Such as bikes that are lowered. And bikes with extended swingarms will exhibit less effect. That is why they launch better than bikes with standard set-ups.
 

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o.k., i'm no expert...i'm no racer, havent got to do a trackday either(one is in the works), BUT i am inquisitive, and i have dialed the damping (both rebound and compression) and adjusted the preload on the forks up and down done the rear as well, but not the preload since i liked it the way it is... guys, i feel like the front end came up easier with a bit more rebound damping coupled with a line more preload and taking the compression down a quarter turn or so on the tail( went back to stock settings in the back since the rear would get weird under load... guys have talked about this in the past) ...i've since gone back to close to stock settings since although the suspension action was softer(initially , thats what i was looking to check) at speed it was crap...

yeah yeah i know were not talking about rebound or compression, but those three things did make a slight difference...i'm no expert but i could tell a difference... the forks allow the front to get light a tad quicker or something...this is my story and i'm stickin to it...



BTW i use this back and forth discourse as a learning tool so no hard feelings on "educating" me if i dont understand something please let me know, i just saw this thread and have some experience with fiddling with my bike, nothing more...thats how we all learn...
 

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zeta xray said:
Nope. Most standard bikes jack up in the back when under load on a dyno. They compress back down when the throttle is rolled off. This does not apply to bikes with non-standard geometry. Such as bikes that are lowered. And bikes with extended swingarms will exhibit less effect. That is why they launch better than bikes with standard set-ups.
my 84 honda nighthawk with a shaft drive would lift under load, apparently the bmw guys fixed that with paralever way back when... whats the dif on a dyno i thought chain bikes did squat a bit under acceleration?!?!?( i know i'm stereotyping, but a general explanation would be great...)
 

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zeta xray said:
Nope. Most standard bikes jack up in the back when under load on a dyno. They compress back down when the throttle is rolled off. This does not apply to bikes with non-standard geometry. Such as bikes that are lowered. And bikes with extended swingarms will exhibit less effect. That is why they launch better than bikes with standard set-ups.
yea that could be..
well in my expierience it's exactly the opposite but most of the time I've spent around the dyno has been on 300+ horsepower bikes...these bikes will take the tightest chain and make it have a sick amount of slack to it.
they have to ratchet strap them down to keep the tire from spinning and the bike will still try and bottom the suspension and try to crawl over the front of the dyno...you haven't lived until you've witnessed a 500 horse pull... :mrgreen:
 

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zeta xray is totally right.....not could be.....look at and bike take off in slow motion or even a drag car, the ass of the car goes up....just the opposite of what you would think but it does....that is how you get wheel hop..
 

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MAVRIK said:
zeta xray is totally right.....not could be.....look at and bike take off in slow motion or even a drag car, the ass of the car goes up....just the opposite of what you would think but it does....that is how you get wheel hop..

yes he is... I asked a couple of people more knowledgable in the dynoing of liter bikes.. and they agreed with him... my bad..
 

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on the dyno suspension extends (or tries to) as it does on the street/track.

BD
 

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Big Daddy said:
on the dyno suspension extends (or tries to) as it does on the street/track.

BD
soooo, are we deciding that the ass lifts under acceleration??? plz define "extends" sounds like your saying it lifts the bike under load....
 

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the shock will extend under acceleration, i.e. swingarm pushes down.

BD
 

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On any recent sportbike with more-or-less stock ride height, the swingarm pivot will be higher off the ground than the rear axle. Furthermore, the slope of the top run of the chain (which is under very high tension when under load) will be closer to horizontal than the swingarm because the front sprocket is smaller than the rear one. It follows that the chain is trying very hard to pull the rear wheel forward, and this causes a component of the force to push the swingarm pivot upward due to the slope of the swingarm.

If you do anything that raises the static position of the rear suspension (preload or ride height), then the swingarm gets sloped even more, which causes a greater lifting effect. If you do anything that lowers the static position of the rear suspension, it will reduce the lifting effect.

On top of this ... if you do anything to EITHER end of the bike that raises its static ride position (with rider aboard) then you raise its center of gravity. Preload - ride height - whatever. The reverse is true if you do anything to lower the center of gravity.

And on top of THAT ... If the front suspension "tops out" during acceleration (e.g. due to too much spring preload), then it will hop and skip over every slight imperfection in the pavement. If the front suspension has room to extend and absorb the bumps, then the tendency to kick the front end up in the air is reduced.

When I crank the throttle, I prefer my bike to F off in a straight line without wiggling and wobbling rather than go straight up in the air or wag the bars.
 
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