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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Have an old set of Bridgestone R10s and a new set.

Was going to use the old set to set up my 2011 ZX10R at the track and then use the new set after, but the old set are going blue.

They are at least 5 years old, but they've always been kept in a cool dark environment (garage) when not on the track, and have been used with warmers.

Should I bin them and just use the new set?

PS. I'm not that fast :crackup:
 

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I would not use brand new 5 year old tires on the track let alone blue ones... A $300 set of tires is cheap insurance when it comes to keeping your bike shiny as it will cost you a lot more than a new set of tires if you wad it up.
 

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Im not a track guy...


YET!

But, isnt the blueing a sign of massive heat cycles? I mean, i just dont think i could bring that on by riding on the street but i guess its possible.
Dare i say tires could be one of the most important things on a bike, its your only tiny contact patch and connection to the earth.
 

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But, isnt the blueing a sign of massive heat cycles?
Not really.... that is the oils and catalysts in the tire coming to the surface and it can happen on basically new tires if left long enough. The bluing can certainly be exacerbated by heat cycles and some brands or models of tires are way more susceptible to the discoloration than others, but it is part of the normal process of the tire. It's not even necessarily a bad thing, but there is a certain stigma associated with the blue color as it generally happens worse to shagged race tires.
 

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While I completely agree with LDH and don't use the old tires, there are a couple things you can check. First look on the side of the tire and see what the tire date is. This will tell you EXACTLY how old they are. You may have owned them for 5 years, but they could also have sat on the shelf in the store for another year. So check the manufacture date.

Also like LDH mentioned, bluing is generally from normal head cycles and the releasing of the oils from the rubber. One thing to compare is put your thumb nail into the blued part and compare it to the same section of the new tire. More than likely the blued section will be much harder and less pliable than the new tire.
 

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I wouldnt ride 5 year old tires on a normal ride to work, and of course never on a track day. Can be gotten real good deals these days on new tires, so id yes get rid of them. By the way im a Michelin fan ;) super sticky stuff.
 

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Your old set of tires sounds like a great excuse for a nice long road trip on interstate highways. Maybe visit us up here in Canada! After exchange, your US$ dollar goes quite far here.



EDIT: shoot, I see that you're in the U.K. There goes my idea. I assumed that you were American.
 

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When I drop $150 for a track day I want my bike to have fresh new tires. There is a DOT 4 digit oval stamp on the sidewall that tells you the week (first two digits) and the year (last two digits) the tires were manufactured. For instance 4512 would means the 45 week of 2012 (see picture). Because of the supply chain and transit times most tires at best will be 9-10 months old when you buy them. On the track you presumably will be pushing the bike and your skills to the limit. Why handicap yourself or set yourself up for an accident by using old hard rubber at the track.
 

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When I drop $150 for a track day I want my bike to have fresh new tires. There is a DOT 4 digit oval stamp on the sidewall that tells you the week (first two digits) and the year (last two digits) the tires were manufactured. For instance 4512 would mean the 45 week of 2012 (see picture). Because of the supply chain and transit times most tires at best will be 9-10 months old when you buy them. On the track you presumably will be pushing the bike and your skills to the limit. Why handicap yourself or set yourself up for an accident by using old hard rubber at the track.

Same goes for Condoms!
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I won a race on a 5 year old tire.
Thank you :mrgreen:

I think the responses are a bit OTT, but I did ask for your opinions so thanks anyway...I must admit I actually have first hand experience of using old tyres (blue or otherwise), and have never had a problem, but I wanted to see the level of responses and you guys didn't disappoint :lol:

Obviously, you would not be trying to push for a lap time, unless you were experienced to understand the feedback of a worn tyre like say dricked, but neither would it be as bad as sticking your dick in a blender (unless you like that kind of thing).

Anyway...I take onboard what you lot are saying but I may just go new front...Old rear.

Like I said, just setting the bike up (geometry), so will be going around, not trying to blaze a trail.

evallarta thanks for the advice about the compliancy of the rubber, I can use that.

Thanks anyway guys
 

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I've used blue tires many times. They are nowhere near as good as fresh new rubber but at the time I couldn't really tell the difference and if your "not that fast" you probably won't either. I noticed there was less edge grip with that 5 year old tire but really it wasn't terrible. That tire sat mounted in my unheated garage that whole time too :)
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I've used blue tires many times. They are nowhere near as good as fresh new rubber but at the time I couldn't really tell the difference and if your "not that fast" you probably won't either. I noticed there was less edge grip with that 5 year old tire but really it wasn't terrible. That tire sat mounted in my unheated garage that whole time too :)
Well at least mine aren't mounted so hopefully profile hasn't been affected by bike standing and causing a flat spot.

Be good to see how well the TC works on the bike with the used rear...If it activates at all...I want to try to activate it at some point....Have done so from a hard standing start, but would like to see how it stacks up coming out of a corner.

Anyway, like I said I am going to mount the new front and then get a few laps in then mount the new rear probably on another occasion when I'm more confident with the set up.

Thanks for the insight.
 
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