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At this point, you're going to have to start looking at the vacuum synchronization. The G4 and G5 both use an idle speed control valve to automatically adjust the speed of it. The vacuum sync is easier on the G4 because the throttle is manually controlled. On the G5, the throttlebodies are supposed to be connected to the Kawi Diagnostic System (KDS) to override the software programming and lock the throttle plates at a certain position so the vacuum can be set. Otherwise, the computer will move the plates and they'll hunt around and you can't adjust the bypass screws.

It may be time to schedule a visit to the dealer and have them do a vacuum sync/adjust on it. There's something going on with the TBs in terms of the vacuum or TPS that is recurring and driving the idle up that high.
 

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Ok so first test I did was swapping the ecus again. Had idle at 7k with the new, swapped to the previous ecu I had and 4k idle, same speed I had when I switched it out.
Hope this hasnt screwed with the ecus in some permament way....

So I did take my time reading the service manual and found this

447991


Which leads to this

447992


Basically its all within the throttle body, like all the possible problems are there.
I think either 1, the thottle position sensor is bad in some way (need special tool to test)
or some other sensor within the TBs is giving wrong data do the ecu which then accels more.
I dont understand how come it doesnt react to the super high idle?

However, all the options I read in the manual point to solving different errors, I have no errors.

At this point, you're going to have to start looking at the vacuum synchronization. The G4 and G5 both use an idle speed control valve to automatically adjust the speed of it. The vacuum sync is easier on the G4 because the throttle is manually controlled. On the G5, the throttlebodies are supposed to be connected to the Kawi Diagnostic System (KDS) to override the software programming and lock the throttle plates at a certain position so the vacuum can be set. Otherwise, the computer will move the plates and they'll hunt around and you can't adjust the bypass screws.

It may be time to schedule a visit to the dealer and have them do a vacuum sync/adjust on it. There's something going on with the TBs in terms of the vacuum or TPS that is recurring and driving the idle up that high.
I dont understand much, how could incorrect vacuum synchronization lead to the ecu doing higher idle?
Doing a vacuum sync/adjust is for sure out of my capacity and I dont have the tools for the job.

Would maybe buying and switching my entire TBs solve it? If I had incorrect vacuum synchronization, would would a tbs switch fix it?


Thanks for the replies
 

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If you put new TB’s on I would definitely check the sync. The tools is not expensive to do it. The accelerator position sensor is not inside the TB, but the TPS is for sure. Not sure about the other sensors. If it’s beyond your skill to fix, you need a dealer to work it out, but playing Random part bingo can get expensive very quickly!
 

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If you put new TB’s on I would definitely check the sync. The tools is not expensive to do it. The accelerator position sensor is not inside the TB, but the TPS is for sure. Not sure about the other sensors. If it’s beyond your skill to fix, you need a dealer to work it out, but playing Random part bingo can get expensive very quickly!
Actually the accelerator postion sensor is exactly the same as the TPS. Its bundled with the TB's in same "adjusted from factory" do not touch thing.

447994


Im probably going to a mechanic anyway, but im pretty sure at this point ill end up having to switch the TB.
So I got an additional question. Are the RR and the standard TB's the same? The part numbers are different but upon closer look and by looking at each independant subpart number they seem to be the same thing. Can anyone confirm?
Still need to understand how a possible faulty sync can lead to 7k idle rpm
 

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I stand corrected! Oh I think the throttle on the Gen5 is still cables until under the tank, where it becomes ride by wire, right? In which case it makes sense!
My bad!
 

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I stand corrected! Oh I think the throttle on the Gen5 is still cables until under the tank, where it becomes ride by wire, right? In which case it makes sense!
My bad!
Yes, exactly like that. It looks like gen4 but its ride by wire. Still need answers to my questions if anyone can confirm thanks !
 

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Yes, exactly like that. It looks like gen4 but its ride by wire. Still need answers to my questions if anyone can confirm thanks !
The TB swap should take care of the high idle problem, presuming that the new TB is good in terms on the initial sync. The vacuum sync is set by a couple of bypass screws. If those aren't set right, I'm thinking that the ECU is trying to compensate for the bad value by opening the throttle causing the idle to go high. Could be the TPS as well. Don't really know. The vac sync check is easy, the TPS is not and that's why I suggested that at least. If you went with a new TB set, then it should be good. If you went with a used set, then I'd probably check the sync on that as well to be sure.

Yes, the TPS is part of the throttlebody. The throttle grip pulls the cable, the cable opens the TPS, the ECU looks at that value and then opens the throttle for you. It's all contained in the throttlebody.
 

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Yes, the TPS is part of the throttlebody. The throttle grip pulls the cable, the cable opens the TPS, the ECU looks at that value and then opens the throttle for you. It's all contained in the throttlebody.
Sorry @SkyDork to bother again and disagree, but : "the cable opens the TPS" --> that's incorrect.

When twisting your right hand, the cable turns the Accelerator Position Sensor.
The Accelerator Position Sensor feedbacks the ECU how much power the rider want to have at the rear wheel.
Then the ECU decides how much the throttle valves have to be opened (1*).
The throttle valves are driven by the ETV Actuator (controled by the ECU).
The Throttle Position Sensor is turned by the throttle valves and always feedbacks the ECU the position of them .

@Comi I recommend you to check both the values of the APS and TPS according service manual.
If you don't have a Bypass-Connector, you may use the solder leads of a simple resistor to stick in (but measuring without the resistor of course).

But... I just guess: after you stated there is no FI Code, it rather will be false air intake... somewhere volatile... at the throttle body sealings. <-- have you checked by spraying some oil or silicon in this area, when revs are currently high?


(1*) The ECU may also think: "Fuck off you little bugger. This will not work in this condition ! NO WAY !"
 

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Sorry @SkyDork to bother again and disagree, but : "the cable opens the TPS" --> that's incorrect.

When twisting your right hand, the cable turns the Accelerator Position Sensor.
The Accelerator Position Sensor feedbacks the ECU how much power the rider want to have at the rear wheel.
Then the ECU decides how much the throttle valves have to be opened (1*).
The throttle valves are driven by the ETV Actuator (controled by the ECU).
The Throttle Position Sensor is turned by the throttle valves and always feedbacks the ECU the position of them .

@Comi I recommend you to check both the values of the APS and TPS according service manual.
If you don't have a Bypass-Connector, you may use the solder leads of a simple resistor to stick in (but measuring without the resistor of course).

But... I just guess: after you stated there is no FI Code, it rather will be false air intake... somewhere volatile... at the throttle body sealings. <-- have you checked by spraying some oil or silicon in this area, when revs are currently high?


(1*) The ECU may also think: "Fuck off you little bugger. This will not work in this condition ! NO WAY !"
Weird but true ! with the wrist you move the accel sensor

448015



Ive kinda given up, the RR is going to a mechanic next week and we'll see from there. I guess imma have to change the TB probably, since im guessing some sensor is fked up.
Just need to know if the standard R TB is the same as the RR TB, which from what ive seen id say yes but need to be sure.
 

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Sorry @SkyDork to bother again and disagree, but : "the cable opens the TPS" --> that's incorrect.

When twisting your right hand, the cable turns the Accelerator Position Sensor.
The Accelerator Position Sensor feedbacks the ECU how much power the rider want to have at the rear wheel.
Then the ECU decides how much the throttle valves have to be opened (1*).
The throttle valves are driven by the ETV Actuator (controled by the ECU).
The Throttle Position Sensor is turned by the throttle valves and always feedbacks the ECU the position of them .

@Comi I recommend you to check both the values of the APS and TPS according service manual.
If you don't have a Bypass-Connector, you may use the solder leads of a simple resistor to stick in (but measuring without the resistor of course).

But... I just guess: after you stated there is no FI Code, it rather will be false air intake... somewhere volatile... at the throttle body sealings. <-- have you checked by spraying some oil or silicon in this area, when revs are currently high?


(1*) The ECU may also think: "Fuck off you little bugger. This will not work in this condition ! NO WAY !"
You are technically correct! I was attempting to describe how it worked from a more top-level standpoint. I didn't really want to get into the weeds with the details of the closed-loop system and all the components. But the detail is always good! Yup, the throttle grip turns the position sensor, the ECU drives the throttle, and the feedback of that position is monitored to make sure the commanded value matches the driven value, given the parameters of the software algorithms that dictate it.

I thought saying that originally would be lost on the discussion of the way the "ride-by_wire" set up on this bike worked. It's kind of boring to most people. :ROFLMAO::geek::geek::geek: But thanks for calling me out on that and setting the record straight! (y)
 

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Ive kinda given up, the RR is going to a mechanic next week and we'll see from there. I guess imma have to change the TB probably, since im guessing some sensor is fked up.
Just need to know if the standard R TB is the same as the RR TB, which from what ive seen id say yes but need to be sure.
When I compare in spare part catalogues I can't see any difference:
both 2018RR and 2018R are using the 16163-0863 TB

I don't know what it is about this number 16163-0867 I can't find it in spare parts! Maybe the ebayer was something overnighted?

But there are so many more 16163-0863 TB to buy... I think you will find one and try?
 

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When putting a new TB on, new or old, I would sync the bodies to be sure. It’s not so hard to check/do If you follow the manual.
 

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Found someone posting in facebook a TB from a 18'RR (same as mine) for 145.
From the other pics and the available parts I guess the bike was totalled badly. Do these look good to you? should I pull the trigger before the mechanic checks?

448045
 
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