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Well after searching and reading about suspension settings, I want to adjust mine for better grip. The only problem I have never messed with it and I have no clue how. I dont want to mess anything up or make it worse. I am an agressive rider on the street and like to hit all he twisties arround here so I want to maximize that. I weigh 230lbs in leathers.. I am also getting ready to put a 190/55 on if that makes any difference. Thanks for any advice..
 

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1. Stay with the 190/50 rear tire size. Put on new tires before mucking around with suspension at all.

2. For street riding, adjust front preload so as to achieve 35mm rider-aboard sag, adjust rear preload to achieve 30mm rider-aboard sag. For track riding, take 5mm off both of those. Keep in mind that this is only a starting point.

3. Set the front ride height to give the most neutral turn-in response. If you have to hold the bike down in a corner (and you are hanging-off in the corner), you need to lower the front ride height by sliding the forks up in the triple clamps. 3~5mm lowering is not uncommon to get it to feel right. Don't change ride height by more than that. It is also possible to do this by raising the rear rather than lowering the front - the good thing is that a higher bike has more cornering clearance - the bad thing is that a higher bike has a higher center of gravity and will want to wheelie more, which is fine for stunting but not for getting the power to the ground.

4. Damping settings have to be done more-or-less by feel.
 

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GoFaster said:
1. Stay with the 190/50 rear tire size. Put on new tires before mucking around with suspension at all.
Could not disagree more - finding a solid all around setup for your suspension is the single most important handling solution available. You can over-ride or out-ride questionable tires but even the best road or race rubber can't fix a bad suspension setup (and many times will make it worse)!

Set your sag, set all your adjusters in the middle of the range for a starting point and then go here:

http://www.sportrider.com/tech/suspension/

for a great suspension setup primer. It's in plain English so we can follow along.
 

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for comp/damper adjustment, why not go with the stock setup as starting point. at least you know the weight it is setup for. you can then go stiffer or softer depend on your weight.
 

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There is no such thing as a 'stock' setup. The suspension parts come off the assembly line in no particular state of tune and are not changed until you do it yourself (my fork comp settings were all the way hard on the left and middle click on the right when I picked up my bike - and my RC51 was even worse).

Now, some dealerships will set the adjusters to the middle but they are few and far between and how would you know? The only way to be sure the suspension is correct is to set it yourself.
 

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lavudyar said:
There is no such thing as a 'stock' setup. The suspension parts come off the assembly line in no particular state of tune and are not changed until you do it yourself (my fork comp settings were all the way hard on the left and middle click on the right when I picked up my bike - and my RC51 was even worse).

Now, some dealerships will set the adjusters to the middle but they are few and far between and how would you know? The only way to be sure the suspension is correct is to set it yourself.
check the manual lately? it's in there stock setup for 150lb.
 

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nobody said:
check the manual lately? it's in there stock setup for 150lb.
I remember seeing that, but that's not really stock. Maybe I should have clarified - 'stock' means 'unchanged' to me, so stock or unchanged suspension from the dealer is unacceptable because you have no idea if he set it to the middle of the range or not. You really shouldn't trust these things to the low man on the mechanic's totem pole.

And yes, the settings in the manual are right in the middle of the adjustment range.
 

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Ok not trying to be an ass here just learning myself. Arent the bikes set up for a 150 lbs rider? And isnt the determined by the spring rate. And the valving is for fine tuning for each individual?
 

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stock means factory setting to me and not from dealer.

the only setting in the middleis the front fork compression wich is at 7th click range 1 ~ 14.
 

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Factory settings are non-existent. The bikes are assembled, started, disassembled, boxed and shipped. No one in Japan messes with the suspension settings before shipping. So while there is a recommendation in the manual for settings, who are you trusting to make sure they were done?

And don't forget the front rebound - 9th click of 18 (17 really, but everyone counts a bit differently). I didn't bother reading back to the rear settings.

Spring rate is set for a range of rider weights and styles of riding. Preload settings make the more specific adjustments for specific weights. The comp and rebound adjustments control movement rates.
 

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lavudyar said:
Factory settings are non-existent. The bikes are assembled, started, disassembled, boxed and shipped. No one in Japan messes with the suspension settings before shipping. So while there is a recommendation in the manual for settings, who are you trusting to make sure they were done?
i'd trust the manual of course. that is factory or default setting. you know those cell phone? it has default setting which resets to default or factory if you messed up the settings.
 

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Suspension components are not electronic nor do they have a memory and do not 'reset to default' settings. When they are assembled, they are not set to what is in the manual, they are just slapped on the bike in whatever state they were built (for instance the rebound could be full in and comp full out). If your dealership doesn't set it right, you will have handling issues.

This is why I'm saying to set your sag them put the adjusters in the middle. You will have a solid starting point and can make adjustments from there. If you do a trackday or 2, you can play with the settings by adjusting each one full in and full out just to see what it feels like. Take good notes and make one change at a time.
 

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yea yea fine gotcha. we're talking two different things. whatever is written in the manual is the factory settings. those settings are on the manual for a reason. not saying anything about how you recieved it from where ever. it is not a memory but it's a memory in the paper and you can reset it manually.

can we agree now?
 

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Nope..I don't care what the manual says....This bike is NOT set-up for a 150lb rider. Not with a .925kg spring in the front. As for the rear shock...Nope, not that either. I weigh 225 and I can get the right sag, but not by a whole lot. So, a 150lb rider is not going to come anywhere close to getting the correct numbers.

Colin...PM me and I will help you get this set up.
 

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lavudyar said:
Could not disagree more - finding a solid all around setup for your suspension is the single most important handling solution available. You can over-ride or out-ride questionable tires but even the best road or race rubber can't fix a bad suspension setup (and many times will make it worse)!
Combination of mis-explaining and mis-understanding here. By my recommendation to put on new tires before mucking with suspension, I mean that you have to do the adjustments based on the bike having good tires on it. If you try to do suspension adjustments on worn-out tires - particularly ride-height adjustments that affect the turn-in response - you are going to be way off the mark and it's STILL not going to work right.

I stand by the recommendation to stay with the stock tire sizes unless there is a sound, rational reason for changing them. I made the comment that I did because the original poster mentioned changing to a different rear tire size.
 

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If this bike is going to see any amount of track time, I would seegest changing to a 180/50 or a 180/55. I know the handling differences on an 05 with a 190 and with a 180. Wouldn't go back to the 190, let put it that way.

Now, I just got new tires for next months track day so I have no opinion on how a 180/50 handles versus a 180/55.
 
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