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i have to give my zx10r engine a shot of starting fluid to get it going when the temp drops. is there a cold weather starting sequence that acts like a choke?
anyone have any help? would adding number to the fuel map at the bottom end help? i have a power commander.
 

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You shouldn't have a problem with cold start. It is -15 C up here in Toronto and I just started my bike no problem.
________
VOYEUR RUSSIAN
 

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I'm not sure how cold it is where you are from, but cold shouldn't have an effect. The only thing I could suggest is throw a battery tender on. I am currently stationed in biloxi mississippi and my bike is in oregon. I have a battery tender hooked up and never unplug it. Once a week, or once every two weeks my dad comes over and starts it up for me. Always starts up. I also have a Power commander on. Good luck.
 

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Try cycling the fuel pump by turning the ignition on till the rail is charged and then turn off and repeat.

Also if your battery is low on charge you will have a problem.
 

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FAF is on to something there when a EFI motor is turned on by the switch the ECU allow the injectors to "fog" the the intake track with a burst of fuel so if the fuel rail is dry or "empty" the yea thurn your ingnition switch on off a couple of times and remember to have your ON - OFF switch to run

Plus on a diff note when was the last time you changed your oil the reason (being the worst case) you have a heavy wieght oil in the motor and being cold from where your from it may take a little more turn over on the motor to produce enough pressure/flow for the ECU to know to allow it to start, that
is again on an extreme end of the spectrum there

Hope this helps

Just remember the computer will not let the motor start if certain sequence of event are not present -- that is with any FUEL INJECTED SYSTEM some are more in tune than others
 

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leemille said:
i have to give my zx10r engine a shot of starting fluid to get it going when the temp drops. is there a cold weather starting sequence that acts like a choke?
anyone have any help? would adding number to the fuel map at the bottom end help? i have a power commander.
Yes, there is a cold-start sequence built into the ECU. It primes the fuel pump and partly opens the secondary throttles; there is a linkage that causes this to crack open the main throttles (this is how the fast idle works). During cranking and for a short period after starting the air/fuel ratio is set slightly rich to help with ignition.

How old are the sparkplugs? If/when they were changed, did you use the correct replacements?? Weak ignition will usually show up at cold starting first.

Given that it's winter over most of the area, how old is the gasoline in the tank? If the volatile stuff that engines rely on for cold starting has evaporated, you could have trouble. But I've had gasoline sit in there for 2 months and mine started as if it had been run yesterday.

If you are having trouble with cold starting but the bike runs fine after warm-up, assuming that the bike is STOCK, my prime suspect would be the coolant temperature sensor. Unfortunately, the coolant temp sensor in this bike uses a separate sensing element for the ECU and for the coolant temperature display, so you can't go by a correct/incorrect display on the instrument panel. (Both sensing elements are in the same housing but they are electrically separate. I just confirmed this in the shop manual. One could be bad and the other could still be good.)

After your engine starts, does it do the proper fast-idle sequence? If it's cold, it should go up to around 2000 rpm for a minute or two and then settle gradually back to normal idle speed. If your bike does not do this, that's further evidence that the ECU doesn't realize that the engine is cold, check the coolant temp sensor.

The power commander can't be excluded from blame, either ... but I wouldn't fiddle with maps to cover up a real problem somewhere else. The only map number that might matter is the one for zero throttle position and the lowest engine RPM (i.e. cranking).

Also, if you have a TRE, and you have tampered with the secondary throttle position sensor, that could have an influence, although then it should still start if you *slightly* crack open the throttle.

Happy diagnosing ...
 

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Starting the bike every once and a while while it is being stored is a bad idea, can lead to condensation in the motor and condensation leads to rust, that is no good for the cylinders.


SG
 

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I just started mine for the first time in 6 weeks and it started with no hesitation. I don't think cold will be a problem. It has been in the negatives here and today it got up to about 29f. I decided to start it and let it warm up. It started and warmed till the temperature was about 140 on the display and I blipped the throttle a couple of times and let it settle back to idle then turned it off for another sleep period or at least till my new exhaust from www.Indysuperbikes.com comes. I can't wait. They had to order it from spain. It is the Black shorty exhaust from IXIL. I also will probably start it again when I get the Lsl superbike bar kit from www.superbikesupply.com. I really can't wait!! Sorry I thread jacked you but anyway,it should start with no problems. I did add Stabil fuel stabilizer when I put it away but I did not add a battery tender. Good luck with whatever you figure out.:thumbsup:
 

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You sure its not the pc? Seems like alot of problems are from faulty power commanders.
 

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GoFaster said:
Yes, there is a cold-start sequence built into the ECU. It primes the fuel pump and partly opens the secondary throttles; there is a linkage that causes this to crack open the main throttles (this is how the fast idle works). During cranking and for a short period after starting the air/fuel ratio is set slightly rich to help with ignition.

How old are the sparkplugs? If/when they were changed, did you use the correct replacements?? Weak ignition will usually show up at cold starting first.

Given that it's winter over most of the area, how old is the gasoline in the tank? If the volatile stuff that engines rely on for cold starting has evaporated, you could have trouble. But I've had gasoline sit in there for 2 months and mine started as if it had been run yesterday.

If you are having trouble with cold starting but the bike runs fine after warm-up, assuming that the bike is STOCK, my prime suspect would be the coolant temperature sensor. Unfortunately, the coolant temp sensor in this bike uses a separate sensing element for the ECU and for the coolant temperature display, so you can't go by a correct/incorrect display on the instrument panel. (Both sensing elements are in the same housing but they are electrically separate. I just confirmed this in the shop manual. One could be bad and the other could still be good.)

After your engine starts, does it do the proper fast-idle sequence? If it's cold, it should go up to around 2000 rpm for a minute or two and then settle gradually back to normal idle speed. If your bike does not do this, that's further evidence that the ECU doesn't realize that the engine is cold, check the coolant temp sensor.

The power commander can't be excluded from blame, either ... but I wouldn't fiddle with maps to cover up a real problem somewhere else. The only map number that might matter is the one for zero throttle position and the lowest engine RPM (i.e. cranking).

Also, if you have a TRE, and you have tampered with the secondary throttle position sensor, that could have an influence, although then it should still start if you *slightly* crack open the throttle.

Happy diagnosing ...
best advice yet if the obvious isn't there..:thumbsup:
 

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S.ga.rider said:
You sure its not the pc? Seems like alot of problems are from faulty power commanders.
It wouldn't surprise me.
 
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