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Discussion Starter #3
Care to share you numbers like ride height and swing arm angle?
Unfortunately it doesn't quite work that way, lemme elaborate. Geometry is based off a number of measurements. Rake angle, fork length, tire diameter front and rear, triple tree offset, shock length, rear axle position. In order for my #s to work on your bike you would have to have EVERYTHING exactly the same as mine. So you would have to have Pirellis with a 190/55 on the back, extend your forks internally 10 mm, and make sure you have the rear axle position perfectly. And to add too it you have to take into account your riding style and pace!

But I will say when I finished I settled on 12.3 degrees of downslope on the swingarm angle, 100.2 mm of trail and 23.9 degree rake.
 

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Yes you are right, I was just wondering what numbers they came up with. In 1999 we had Computrac set up a GSXR 600 race bike and check the frame for true. Before the bike was even raced or crashed, the frame had to be straightened. You will always find the optimum swing arm angle between 11 and 12.5 degrees. The front end can vary quit a bit from bike to bike.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Yes you are right, I was just wondering what numbers they came up with. In 1999 we had Computrac set up a GSXR 600 race bike and check the frame for true. Before the bike was even raced or crashed, the frame had to be straightened. You will always find the optimum swing arm angle between 11 and 12.5 degrees. The front end can vary quit a bit from bike to bike.
Gotcha. We usually set 1000s between 12 and 13 degrees of swingarm angle and 600s between 13 and 14 degrees.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Cool shit man

Wish I had a clue what I was looking at lol
:lol:

Basically everything is based off geometry. First the black thing that hangs over the seat has two infrared cameras in it. At the bottom it has to pins that slide into the swingarm pivot. The system knows the measurement from the camera to the that pivot point. Next the little black thing up front with the cable is a "point". The camera measures the distance using geometry. The rail at the bottom has numbers on it and we use the vertical post to measure axle height and length. We take a few other measurements and plug them into the computer. The software then figures out your rake, trail, and swingarm angle. The last part is the simulator. This allows us move the forks up and down in the triple and lengthen and shorten the shock and see what rake, trail and swingarm numbers we get. Once we are happy with the numbers we want to take the adjustments and apply them to the bike. Basically it takes out ALLLL the guess work. When you hear the top levels talking about they work with numbers to get the bike how they want it, this is what they are talking about.
 

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I was able to talk to Eric (op) at a local track day this past weekend. He is very knowledgeable about suspension, geometry and everything playing a factor in the setup .

Now I understand a little more about him shooting his bike LOL
 

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LOL..Gotta understand the basics and and how to use what i got before i were to go lookin at shootin my bike...Thats info that WWWWAAAAYYYYYYY over my head..
 

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ya i thought the same thing, eric kinda had to "dumb it down" for me on saturday lol but once that happened, i started to understand his side of the job

cool stuff for sure
 
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