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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone.

I recently ordered some Goodridge superbike pro ss lines for my Gen 4. They are a 1 into 2 line kit.

When I came to fit them I'm finding a problem as I think there is an issue with all the banjo connectors being out of wack.

I have been informed by Goodridge the correct way to fit the lines is with the short line (with 20 degree banjo) connected to the master cylinder, the next longest connected to the right caliper (from rider view) and the longer lenght (with 45 degree banjo) connected to the left caliper (from rider view). Logical enough. However...


If I connect the short line (with 20 degree banjo) to the master cylinder I can only connect up the next longest to the left caliper (rider view) and the longest length to the right caliper (rider view)

This is the opposite of what Goodridge have said.

Im not sure if I'm "special" or what. Has anyone else had this problem or have their lines installed on their gen 4?

Any help would be appreciated. Even if you tell me I'm a tard.



 

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To me just looking at it, the banjo on the far right should go to your mc and the one on the upper most part of the pic and pointing left should go to your left caliper. Is that what you tried??
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Its a bit hard to visualise, but the banjo on the right of the picture fits to the mc, the line running horizontal across the pic should fit the right caliper (from rider view) and the longer line (off the T connector) should go to the left caliper.

However trying to install it that way its clear it will not work as the banjos to the calipers do not fit flush and the banjo to the mc will not fit either. Basically I think all the banjos are 180 degree the wrong way round.
 

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Well, this would be the way I would do it. I'm not exactly sure what the issue you're having is regarding the banjo bolts. But the line should loop over the front fender very close to it. It should not look like the above picture.

Have you tried connecting them this way?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Tried that, it wont work either. Too much tension in the line to twist correctly, unless the banjos install on the calipers like below.

This is what I mean about the problem with the banjo fittings and the caliper if installed the correct way (as per Goodridge) see post #4

left caliper with banjo around wrong way


right caliper (from rider perspective)


line viewed from the left side (from riders perspective)
 

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Well, the the banjo fittings go the other way on the calipers and the line goes behind the forks, not in front. And there will be some tension in the lines when you twist them to fit, but it won't be a problem. As the lines conform over time, the tension won't be an issue. There's no way to kink the lines or anything and it's not a safety issue or anything.

Connect the left caliper first. Then twist the line as needed to get the right caliper hooked up. Then connect it to the MC last. Again, twisting the lines slightly as needed to form them to the routing. But back sure they route behind the fork tubes just like the OEM ones do.

If you're still not able to get it worked out, send it back and get the 2 line kit which would be better anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
If I install them like post #5 fit on calipers is right but the line up to the mc is tight and not as I belive its supposed to be. I think the line should be like in the last photo of post #7

right caliper (from rider perspective) if installed like post #5


left caliper (from rider perspective) if installed like post #5


Lines up through forks to mc if installed like post #5
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
surely it shouldnt be this hard. Had no probs installing ss lines before.

Fit would be mint if the banjos were rotated 180 degrees
 

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Again, the line should never cross in front of the fork tube like that. There will be some tension in the line as you twist to fit, but you should be able to rotate the banjos 60 degrees in either direction to get them to fit properly. If you do it like I'm saying, it should work out.

The pics above of the banjos is correct, but not the routing on the right line. Both caliper lines should be behind the fork tubes. And there is too much slack in the lines above the fender. It should be a closer fit to the fender. Start low and work your way up to the MC. Use the banjo bolt in the fitting to help you give the line a bit of twist as you work your way up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
cheers for the advice I'll give it a bit of muscle and see if I can twist them.

The reason I didnt install like your post #6 is there are two angles on the banjos, 2 are at 45 degrees the other at 20 degrees. Goodridge told me the 20 degree banjo fits to the mc and the 45 to the calipers.

My previous install of ss lines was 2 full length lines. Alot simpler.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
cheers for the advice I'll give it a bit of muscle and see if I can twist them.

The reason I didnt install like your post #6 is there are two angles on the banjos, 2 are at 45 degrees the other at 20 degrees. Goodridge told me the 20 degree banjo fits to the mc and the 45 to the calipers.

My previous install of ss lines was 2 full length lines. Alot simpler.
 

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I had the same minor issue with my goodridge with so front ss lines on the Gen IV, I had to twist the line a little bit for it to line up, it will work, rotate the line so the banjo fits the other way.....you cant rotate the banjo on these, only by twisting the line, just do it the way it feels a little more comfy....

the banjo angles don't line up exact the way you think they do, just twist your line before the caliper and line them up the right way on the caliper....

I had a similar issue on my kit even though its a 2 line kit, hook it up to the master, and twist the line at some point before the caliper so the banjo will install properly on the caliper....

I had my two line kit meeting the calipers exactly like yours, its wrong, twist the lines before the calipers and the banjos will be flipped around and mounted properly....







 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I just came back from my garage.

Thanks for the post. I have tried but there is extreme snaking if I twist the lines to that extent. Like 3X as in your photos bmacknyc1000. Tried twisting both ways in different combinations. :(

My banjos are 180 degrees out, I cant twist the line 180 degrees in 15 inches. I think its exacerbated by the fact its a 2 into 1 line. Instead of having the whole length of line from the caliper to twist it has only 3 short lengths from the t connector. I will see what Goodridge say, they havent any photos of zx10r with the line kit on when I've asked.
 

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Brake lines in MotoGP and Superbike are almost ALWAYS routed in front of the forks. I have a set of Galfer GP SS brake lines and they are intended to be routed in front of the forks to the calipers (It's listed as an *** IMPORTANT *** point In the installation insturctions and clearly pictured)

The reason this is done is for that little bit of extra cooling that the lines get by not being blocked from airflow by the forks. Required for street? Absolutely not, Track days, perhaps if your brakes get hot or are prone to binding, racing? Every little bit helps especially when the brakes are being used hard over a continuous length of time.

OEM route the brake lines behind the forks for simplicity and liability (the lines are protected by the forks slightly more when routed behind) For racing application functionality and cooling, and slightly easier more accessible maintenance, the lines are routed in front of the forks.

Isn't this a simple question for Goodridge? Just ask if they are supposed to be in front of or behind... problem solved :) There should be ABSOLUTELY no twisting of kinking of the strain relief especially at the master cylinder when the lines are installed. If the lines come out of the banjos anyway but absolutely straight before they start to gently curve, they are the wrong lines or they are installed incorrectly! Do NOT go "I think its ok" with your brakes, too much is riding on them (literally)

Sorry for the size of the pics :(













 

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^^^^ Yup, Superbikes (aka Racebikes) do have the lines routed in front of the forks, but this kit is not for a race bike. :wink: The OEM routing is for protection from the forks, but also to not get pinched up when the front suspension compresses and forces the service loop to get pinched between the wheel and fairing. There's just not enough slack in this kit to route them that way. These are designed to follow the original routing.

Like you said, there's no advantage for a streetbike to route them that way at all. Especially on a line that is covered in a plastic sheath for coloring and protection. There will be no additional cooling for the lines and if someone routes them that way, and can cause the lines to be under more stress unless they are specifically designed that way with the proper added length.
 

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^^^^ Yup, Superbikes (aka Racebikes) do have the lines routed in front of the forks, but this kit is not for a race bike. :wink: The OEM routing is for protection from the forks, but also to not get pinched up when the front suspension compresses and forces the service loop to get pinched between the wheel and fairing. There's just not enough slack in this kit to route them that way. These are designed to follow the original routing.

Like you said, there's no advantage for a streetbike to route them that way at all. Especially on a line that is covered in a plastic sheath for coloring and protection. There will be no additional cooling for the lines and if someone routes them that way, and can cause the lines to be under more stress unless they are specifically designed that way with the proper added length.
This is the part I think he needs to clarify with goodridge as far as the routing... He mentioned they were "Superbike" lines and as such might not be designed for the OEM routing, and as my Galfers are indicated as GP lines, they aren't intended to use the OEM routing either (It would be impossible to use them that way given the clocking of the banjos)

If Goodridge says "Use OEM routing" then there is no question :) but I'm assuming that that bit of info is lacking from the installation instructions for the Goodridge kit given the confusion... It's surprising to me that they would omit that piece of critical installation info :)

Another reason the GP and Superbike routing of the lines in front of the forks exists is because it allows a much larger strain relief curve on the brake lines then could be had using the OEM binding loop on the front fender. Perfect for suspension that routinely gets cycled to its extremes as in racing, but also coincidentally on public streets hitting potholes and riding on crappy California freeways :)

I actually opted for the GP lines that route in front of the forks for this very reason and not the snazzy race cooling reasons :) Compared to the OEM setup, the strain relief locations at the banjos is under significantly less tension because of the extra "slack" afforded by the GP routing.

He definitely needs to get the definitive info from Goodridge though as to how these lines are DESIGNED to be routed, and do exactly that...
 

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This is the part I think he needs to clarify with goodridge as far as the routing... He mentioned they were "Superbike" lines and as such might not be designed for the OEM routing, and as my Galfers are indicated as GP lines, they aren't intended to use the OEM routing either (It would be impossible to use them that way given the clocking of the banjos)

If Goodridge says "Use OEM routing" then there is no question :) but I'm assuming that that bit of info is lacking from the installation instructions for the Goodridge kit given the confusion... It's surprising to me that they would omit that piece of critical installation info :)

Another reason the GP and Superbike routing of the lines in front of the forks exists is because it allows a much larger strain relief curve on the brake lines then could be had using the OEM binding loop on the front fender. Perfect for suspension that routinely gets cycled to its extremes as in racing, but also coincidentally on public streets hitting potholes and riding on crappy California freeways :)

I actually opted for the GP lines that route in front of the forks for this very reason and not the snazzy race cooling reasons :) Compared to the OEM setup, the strain relief locations at the banjos is under significantly less tension because of the extra "slack" afforded by the GP routing.

He definitely needs to get the definitive info from Goodridge though as to how these lines are DESIGNED to be routed, and do exactly that...
+1 I agree......I still think these Goodridge lines can be twisted some way where it will work.....

they will work, he just needs to figure out how they do....most of these GP line kits are routed IN FRONT of the forks...... these style and the 2 line kits are both very good....I don't think any of us mere mortals would feel a difference with either kit, it's just preference....

hope it gets sorted....
 
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