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Hey guys, bought a 2013 zx10r last year and absolutely love it! I'm currently just an aggressive street rider but I want to do a track day when i get back from my deployment. I know once i do a track day ill be hooked! Compared to my last bike the zx10 seems to not want to hold a line that well on exiting the turn. Ive tried doing some research and have got a lot of mixed responses. Ive read that a lot of guys shim the rear and seen other members recommend getting a bigger spring. Im 6'4 240 lbs w/o gear. What do you guys recommend for my situation? I plan on riding this bike on the street and doing a couple track days a year. Thanks for the advice.
-D
 

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You got a mixed responses because that's how suspension goes... lol There's no easy answer.

When making suspension adjustments, you might have 10 options to address a problem. Of those 10, 5 of them will not fix the problem-but will create another problem. 3 of them will fix it but hurt something else. 1 of them won't do a thing. And MAYBE, 1 will actually fix the problem...

LOL

With that said... There are obviously a number of ways to approach your concern.

Without knowing more information, like your riding style, bike set up etc... you can:
1.) Lower the front - but you lose edge grip if you go too far, lose braking stability.
2.) Take some preload off the forks, lose braking stability.
3.) Add preload to the rear, lose rear edge grip and braking stability.
4.) Add spring to the rear, lose rear edge grip and braking stability.
5.) Add ride height to the rear, lose slide characteristics and braking stability.
6.) Alter your line through the corner.
7.) Check your compression, are you getting to the bottom too soon making the bike "plow?"
8.) Slow the rebound down.
9.) Check your body position, make sure you're looking AND leading the bike through the corner.
10.) Check your tire pressures.
11.) Shorten the wheelbase, but lose straight line stability (wheelie control).

Just my $0.02.

:)

Try one and pay attention to how it feels. If it gets worse, put it back and try another.
 

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The rear ride height needs to be raised to help stop the bike from running wide on corner exit. Some shim it 6mm in the rear. I had Dave Moss tune my suspension at Miller last year. He said 8mm shims for the rear so thats what i shimed mine. I go 220 w/o gear. The rear shock is a bit soft it could use heavier oil. It affects rebound on the rear. I just cranked up the rebound all the way and its been working fine. Set your sag if you cant get the right numbers you may need heavier springs at least in the front.
 

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Shim the rear shock 6mm as a starting point. May need to add a few additional mm if needed. But the rear shock is horribly under sprung as well and you're really going to need to look into a stiffer spring at least if you're not going aftermarket. That won't be too expensive and should get most of the issues fixed for ya.


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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks for the advice guys! Probably just going to shim the back 6mm to start off with and re spring the rear shock. Any companies you guys would recommend for the spring? racetech?
 

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Thanks for the advice guys! Probably just going to shim the back 6mm to start off with and re spring the rear shock. Any companies you guys would recommend for the spring? racetech?

Suspension Technologies is local to me in FL and did a great job with mine and a few others on the board here.

suspensiontechnologies.com
 

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I agree you will need to respring and shim the rear. You just missed a great deal on a used Penske in the classifieds for $600. Keep your eye in that forum, there are some great deals
 

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You got a mixed responses because that's how suspension goes... lol There's no easy answer.

When making suspension adjustments, you might have 10 options to address a problem. Of those 10, 5 of them will not fix the problem-but will create another problem. 3 of them will fix it but hurt something else. 1 of them won't do a thing. And MAYBE, 1 will actually fix the problem...

LOL

With that said... There are obviously a number of ways to approach your concern.

Without knowing more information, like your riding style, bike set up etc... you can:
1.) Lower the front - but you lose edge grip if you go too far, lose braking stability.
2.) Take some preload off the forks, lose braking stability.
3.) Add preload to the rear, lose rear edge grip and braking stability.
4.) Add spring to the rear, lose rear edge grip and braking stability.
5.) Add ride height to the rear, lose slide characteristics and braking stability.
6.) Alter your line through the corner.
7.) Check your compression, are you getting to the bottom too soon making the bike "plow?"
8.) Slow the rebound down.
9.) Check your body position, make sure you're looking AND leading the bike through the corner.
10.) Check your tire pressures.
11.) Shorten the wheelbase, but lose straight line stability (wheelie control).

Just my $0.02.

:)

Try one and pay attention to how it feels. If it gets worse, put it back and try another.
I miss these posts a lot, I'm used to seeing them somewhere else though. :hello:
 

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I miss these posts a lot, I'm used to seeing them somewhere else though. :hello:
Also, if anyone has a solution to your suspension problems, it's Niner. He's helped me with my setup (across continents) and teached me a lot about suspension. Experimenting with his suggestions will teach you a great deal about your suspension.
 

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Suspension settings for Big Riders

You got a mixed responses because that's how suspension goes... lol There's no easy answer.

When making suspension adjustments, you might have 10 options to address a problem. Of those 10, 5 of them will not fix the problem-but will create another problem. 3 of them will fix it but hurt something else. 1 of them won't do a thing. And MAYBE, 1 will actually fix the problem...

LOL

With that said... There are obviously a number of ways to approach your concern.

Without knowing more information, like your riding style, bike set up etc... you can:
1.) Lower the front - but you lose edge grip if you go too far, lose braking stability.
2.) Take some preload off the forks, lose braking stability.
3.) Add preload to the rear, lose rear edge grip and braking stability.
4.) Add spring to the rear, lose rear edge grip and braking stability.
5.) Add ride height to the rear, lose slide characteristics and braking stability.
6.) Alter your line through the corner.
7.) Check your compression, are you getting to the bottom too soon making the bike "plow?"
8.) Slow the rebound down.
9.) Check your body position, make sure you're looking AND leading the bike through the corner.
10.) Check your tire pressures.
11.) Shorten the wheelbase, but lose straight line stability (wheelie control).

Just my $0.02.

:)

Try one and pay attention to how it feels. If it gets worse, put it back and try another.
I'm interested to see how this turned out for you. I'm also on the big side (6' 4" -- 250) on Gen 4. Agree that rear is weak spring, but the running wide, from my research will be the balance of what you do in the rear and the rebound in the front. If you start roll on mid-turn, weight shift will bring geometry of front up, so possibly need to slow that down if running wide. I'm intending to track also, and likely will hit the suspension guys at the track for adjustments and knowledge before laying out cash, as I'm still adapting to the bike.

Thanks to all for the good info here on the site. Youre really helping a noob out..:notworthy:
 
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