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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I tried set the front and rear sag on my bike. I'm approx 230 lbs. On the rear suspension I changed the original spring to 110N/mm Öhlins one. Here I can set the sag to the recommended 35mm value. BUT the front fork's sag is very little, I set the preload to 17 mm (7 grooves), but the sag not more than 20mm. Am I doing something wrong? The springs in fork are originals, the oil height is set to standard 107mm, and I'm using Motul 5W synthetic (Factory Line), and the rear raised 25mm high.

Thanks for help!
 

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Can you check measure the free sag of the front, and rider sag?
The thing is, fork springs are less affected by rider weight if you sit naturally upright and not applying any force to the handlebars as you would while riding normally.

Under hard braking, that is a different story. Do you have zip tie to the fork lower tubes to measure travel?
 

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I found the fork action on my G3 (2010) extremely stiff with a lot of stiction. I removed ALL preload and damping and dropped the front 5mm. I was also advised to DROP the rear by removing the 10mm spacer from the shock mount. This made a noticeable difference to the handling. Changing the spring was a good move, but the shock would benefit from upgrading to something like K-Tek
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Can you check measure the free sag of the front, and rider sag?
The thing is, fork springs are less affected by rider weight if you sit naturally upright and not applying any force to the handlebars as you would while riding normally.

Under hard braking, that is a different story. Do you have zip tie to the fork lower tubes to measure travel?
Yes, I will check these parameters, but currently my battery is dead, I hope tomorrow will arrive the new battery, and I can go for a ride.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I found the fork action on my G3 (2010) extremely stiff with a lot of stiction. I removed ALL preload and damping and dropped the front 5mm. I was also advised to DROP the rear by removing the 10mm spacer from the shock mount. This made a noticeable difference to the handling. Changing the spring was a good move, but the shock would benefit from upgrading to something like K-Tek
I don't want to build a track weapon, I'd like a good handling street bike.
 

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Yes, I will check these parameters, but currently my battery is dead, I hope tomorrow will arrive the new battery, and I can go for a ride.
thanks for following up

Even if the bike cannot run, would you or have you tried to push the bike and apply braking to check fork travel?
I am sure the fork travel was verified during fork service, but can you verify this?

For my weight, I have changed to 95 springs from Racetech, and they are longer than stock and required sawing off a portion of the preload tube to match.

The front is stiff, very much stiffer than the rear shock and it becomes very apparent while riding.

Fork stiction is a problem, light grease around the seal lips will improve, if not resolve it altogether. The fork tubes are coated (black color) to improve stiction.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
thanks for following up

Even if the bike cannot run, would you or have you tried to push the bike and apply braking to check fork travel?
I am sure the fork travel was verified during fork service, but can you verify this?

For my weight, I have changed to 95 springs from Racetech, and they are longer than stock and required sawing off a portion of the preload tube to match.

The front is stiff, very much stiffer than the rear shock and it becomes very apparent while riding.

Fork stiction is a problem, light grease around the seal lips will improve, if not resolve it altogether. The fork tubes are coated (black color) to improve stiction.
Hi! Today I could go for a ride. Before riding I close 1 click on compression (it got a little bit harder), and open 1 click on rebound (little bit softer) on fork. My opinion the fork was little softer, maybe too soft (But I don't know what to compare it to), I get this indication few hard braking and some cornering.
Wheel Tire Bicycle tire Automotive tire Automotive lighting
 

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I think that looks ok, but just in terms of fork travel. Next you may want to find a safe road and try hard braking, to make sure the forks won't bottom out with the bike and rider weights altogether.

For damping, set the rebound so that the front and the rear are balanced, in other words, return to normal at a similar speed. Dave Moss track setting is around 1 seconds, and you'd have to watch a few of his videos to determine how it looks.

Compression damping will take a few rides on different road conditions, and your usual riding pace. The faster you go, the more damping is needed.

Allow me to comment on your rear shock. Is it stock? Is it revalved to handle the 110N shock spring? The stock shock is tuned for less, and sprung to 90N if not mistaken. Putting a 110N to it just put the rear shock unable to provide sufficient damping.

Give your current settings a try, and I hope you will find a sweet spot. I had to deal with frustrations with the rear shock and finally acknowledged its shortcomings and sent for revalve. Quite likely you will need it too.

Hope to hear more from you soon.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Currently the rear shock is stock, except the spring.
I think that looks ok, but just in terms of fork travel. Next you may want to find a safe road and try hard braking, to make sure the forks won't bottom out with the bike and rider weights altogether.

For damping, set the rebound so that the front and the rear are balanced, in other words, return to normal at a similar speed. Dave Moss track setting is around 1 seconds, and you'd have to watch a few of his videos to determine how it looks.

Compression damping will take a few rides on different road conditions, and your usual riding pace. The faster you go, the more damping is needed.

Allow me to comment on your rear shock. Is it stock? Is it revalved to handle the 110N shock spring? The stock shock is tuned for less, and sprung to 90N if not mistaken. Putting a 110N to it just put the rear shock unable to provide sufficient damping.

Give your current settings a try, and I hope you will find a sweet spot. I had to deal with frustrations with the rear shock and finally acknowledged its shortcomings and sent for revalve. Quite likely you will need it too.

Hope to hear more from you soon.

The rear shock is stock, except the spring. I try to read a lot on the topic, and found a link you shared: Teach Me Suspension (Part 7): Making Rebound Damping Adjustments (lifeatlean.com)
Luckily I have a good acquaintance whose company deals with competition shock absorbers and they have an Intercomp shock dyno.
 

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Keep the conversation with the acquaintance about setting up a shock to the spring rate, and your goal (street use, comfort bias, front-rear balance) and see where that goes. I emphasize front rear balance, because as you can obviously see, the front forks are really stiff off the shelf.

Put the shock on the dyno, and see where the conversation extrapolates to. If possible, get the forks dyno'd as well. Peter Verdone Designs for some quick read and how things look like.

To a certain point, spending some time and controlled budget, the whole bike should be dialled in, and with the available adjusters, the bike will work well for a long time.
 
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