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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey everyone! So this is my first time posting here, so please bear with me, and I hope I can find an answer to my issue. Regarding the front wheel, I could never tightened the axle to its proper torque of 94 ft./lbs. because the wheel wouldn't spin easily. The more torque I added, the more binding occurred. I took the wheel off the bike and found that the inner tube sleeve does NOT come in contact with the inner race of the right side bearing. There is about a 2 mm or so distance between the two and the bearing was totally seated properly. The left side was fine. I first thought that the left side bearing wasn't seated in far enough, so when I tapped it in further, I found that the inner tube sleeve was in so tight that I couldn't spin the left bearing at all, BUT the right side bearing was completely free. I took out the bearings and found that the inner tube sleeve CANNOT pass through the right side of the wheel whatsoever. For some reason, there is a very sharp-edged ridge in the center of the wheel that the inner sleeve should pass through to meet up with the right side bearing.inner race. It's as if the casting of the wheel wasn't finished properly. Has anyone else had this problem? I'm certain this is why I can't torque the axle down correctly. It is using the ceramic bearings which are absolutely the correct ones. I checked this out extensively. I'll try to post the pics I have of it. They will be of the right side of the wheel. One without the inner sleeve so you can see the sharp ridge and one with the sleeve coming up to the right side hole from the left side and how it cannot pass through the hole. Automotive tire Light Motor vehicle Rim Automotive wheel system
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Looks like someone's used an improper sharp edged instrument (a cut steel pipe?) as a bearing punch tool in the past. Its sharp edge gouged a lip in the wheel and developed an entire circular ridge after they went round in a circle banging out an old bearing from all sides. A proper bearing punch has rounded edges to prevent this gouging. Just get a round file and grind that ridge off and you'd be good to go after. It'd be a miniscule amount of metal so the wheel will still balance and the new bearing doesn't seat on that part of the wheel anyway.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Looks like someone's used an improper sharp edged instrument (a cut steel pipe?) as a bearing punch tool in the past. Its sharp edge gouged a lip in the wheel and developed an entire circular ridge after they went round in a circle banging out an old bearing from all sides. A proper bearing punch has rounded edges to prevent this gouging. Just get a round file and grind that ridge off and you'd be good to go after. It'd be a miniscule amount of metal so the wheel will still balance and the new bearing doesn't seat on that part of the wheel anyway.
Thanks for you reply. I suspected that I'd have to grind or file down the edges there. The bike had about 12,000 miles on it when bought. I had a reputable shop nearby who took out the OEM bearings and put in new ceramic bearings. I have a small diameter round steel rod I use to tap out the bearings and I'm very careful about it.when I do it. So then the tube inner sleeve IS supposed to be able to pass through both sides of the wheel...correct??
 

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It should pass through. It's supposed to fit somewhat loosely between the centre races of the bearings on either side of the hub.
 
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