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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All,

Have been riding a 2011 10R for around 3 months now. Enjoying most aspects of the bike, and a new toy is always exciting.

I have noticed that it is difficult to tip in; at least noticeably more difficult than bikes I have previously owned.

My front tyre is due for a change, and I am considering reducing the profile to a 60 (as opposed to the stock 70 profile).

Does anyone have any experience with this modification to a Gen 4, or any supersport / superbike for that matter?


Cheers,

Brad


Stock 2011 ZX10R tyre sizes for reference:
F 120/70/17
R 190/55/17
 

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Going to a 60 will flatten the profile, making it tip in SLOWER than it does with the 70.

Is this on the street or track?

If it's at the track, TELL it and stock asking it!

If it's on the street, you could play with ride heights.
 

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'16 ZX-10R KRT
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What Niner said is true, the 60 profile will make the turn-in worse, all things being equal.

The tire profile is more about the manufacturer though. A Pirelli is more triangulated than a Dunlop. This makes tip-in easier, but corner corrections more difficult. Everything is a trade off.

If your current front is that worn, it's likely cupped and the center may be flattened out which is causing you the issue. Put a new 70 series on there like it's supposed, get the tire pressure correct, and try the new tire before making any other changes. New tires almost always make the handling much more nimble.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
The front is fairly squared off. I absolutely agree changing it will improve tip in and general front end feel.

I had looked up front tyre profiles though in terms of changing front end feel and couldn't much definitive advice about it so though I would ask.

I have not tracked the bike yet but will. I have to also have another go at re torquing the head stem bearing as it seems some of the 2011 had mis torqued head stems which introduces a pretty loose feel in the front end.

When you add that to the fairly worn front, and practically useless nerfed kawasaki factory ohlins damper, it doesn't inspire confidence.

Really just want to get the front end feeling as good as possible before I take it out and push it.
 

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'16 ZX-10R KRT
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The front is fairly squared off. I absolutely agree changing it will improve tip in and general front end feel.

I had looked up front tyre profiles though in terms of changing front end feel and couldn't much definitive advice about it so though I would ask.

I have not tracked the bike yet but will. I have to also have another go at re torquing the head stem bearing as it seems some of the 2011 had mis torqued head stems which introduces a pretty loose feel in the front end.

When you add that to the fairly worn front, and practically useless nerfed kawasaki factory ohlins damper, it doesn't inspire confidence.

Really just want to get the front end feeling as good as possible before I take it out and push it.
If you're not getting any clunking in the front going over bumps or when braking, then your head bearings are torqued properly. If you're complaining about it being hard to turn-in already, then loose head bearings aren't your issue.

The stock damper is more than adequate and does nothing to help make the front end "feel better". Cranking it up just makes turn-in that much harder to boot.

Sounds like you need to get a good new tire on the front and start playing with your geometry some. If you want it to turn-in quicker and feel planted, stop worrying about the damper and the head bearings. Those have nothing to do with it. Try shimming the rear up some to put more weight on the front, get your swingarm angle correct, and increase the rake on the front slightly. Most guys like to start at 6mm for a good point of reference.
 
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IIRC my R6 had a 60 profile front, but it was designed that way and worked well. My 2011 gen4 turns nicely with stock ride height and suspension. Racers like to run the front with little or no preload and provided this doesnt result in bottoming out the forks, will help with turn in, as will raising the forks 5mm in the yokes
 

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How many miles did you ride it in three months (or since you owned the bike) and how many miles on the bike does the bike have the bridge 16 still.
 

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no problem with tip in on my 2013. Just put a pair of pirelli diablo rosso III's and all i can say is WOW!

Big difference from the stock bridgestones... which i put 6k on them before changing.

Not sure what tires you are running now.

My bike is complete different beast after new set of pirelli tires and ohlins rear shock.

Skydork has alot of knowledge about these bikes..... take what he has to say about it and inhale as much as you can of it.. :notworthy:
 

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stay with the 70 profile front (easier to find, more cost effective), put a larger 200/55 or 190/60 rear on, effectively raising the rear ride height, helping turn in. if you need more turn in, drop, the front end triples, (showing a few more MM's more fork), or add a shim to the rear shock, raising the rear again.

personally I switched the stock bridgestones out for Pirelli supercoarsa SP's (200/55 rear). and the bike turns well, holds a line, and changes direction like a 600 chassis, with only preload, and clicker changes. no geometry changes were needed, for me.

your results, may vary. Ski
 

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Doesn't it mess with the traction control if you change tire profiles? Putting a shorter front tire on the bike would cause the front wheel speed sensor to read too high and trick the ECU into thinking the front wheel is always spinning relative to the rear.
 

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the Pirelli's actually made the bike speedometer read closer to true (verified by gps), than the stock bridgestones. the stones read 5-6 mph, higher than gps... the Pirelli's are 2 mph higher than gps. those figures are taken by the tone rings for traction control, abs on the bike. Ski
 

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^^The tire size discussion is a completely different topic. You can't judge a tire based on the published sizes (ie. 190/55, 200/55, etc...) that's for publication, not for actual measurements.

And their sizing (despite the labeled sizes) vary between brands and even between compounds of the SAME BRAND.

Dunlop for example, there are 200 series tires that are NARROWER than the 190's.

If you want a taller tire, don't go based on what the tire says, look up the data sheet and see what THEY list for the actual tire size.
 
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