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Discussion Starter #1
Bought my bike new in 18 just now replacing the OEM tires. I removed the rims myself to save money when having tires swapped. Front rim brake rotor bolts were extremely hard to get off using hand tools. It seemed like too much thread locker or incorrect tightening method from factory was used. Get tires put on and go to install rotors using same hand tools. Got the left side on with a struggle but the right side now has stripped threads and a broken bolt. Took rim to a local non Kaw dealer and the tech came to the same conclusion. Will be going to Kawasaki dealership this week to see if this covered under warranty though Im not getting my hopes up. Is this a known issue with newer ZX10's ? Tech at dealership said he could remove the bolt and tap the threads but he didnt think it would stand up to the stress and wouldn't gamble on something so crucial. Just want to see if anyone else has had this happen.
 

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Why were the rotors removed while changing tires? No need at all. If the threads are stripped in the rims, change the rim. Not a part that's to be re-tapped .
 

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Took tires to a local Yamaha dealership. When I called and spoke to service dept I asked if I needed to take rotors off and associate stated yes. Still doesn't change the fact that the brake rotors were either overtightened and / or too much thread locker was used.
 

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Took tires to a local Yamaha dealership. When I called and spoke to service dept I asked if I needed to take rotors off and associate stated yes. Still doesn't change the fact that the brake rotors were either overtightened and / or too much thread locker was used.
Well, that was wrong info given by the tech. My 2016 KRT has had multiple tire changes, but the brake rotor bolts are still stock tight, never having been cracked open in 4 yrs.

While those bolts are often tighter than spec, the bolts do not strip unless started wrong. Using a power tool or not using it has nothing to do with it.
 

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Just to clarify the Yamaha dealer that installed the tires is not the same dealership that I had inspect the stripped threads and broken bolt. The tech at the BRP Can-Am dealer I went to checked the left side rotor bolts and also found them to be unusually difficult. At this point just chalking it up to bad rim from factory, bad advice from service tech. Hoping against all hope that warranty might cover this but went ahead and purchased a used rim.
 

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Like already mentioned, there's no reason to touch the rotors for a tire change. Not sure who told you that, or you misheard them when they said that.

The bolts are threadlocked in from the factory for safety reasons. The red threadlock is for semi-permament installations. It's removable, but takes more effort since it's on the threads. If you broke the bolt getting them out, you really didn't do it right. You need to break the threadlock initially with a jolt on the allen wrench. After that, steady tension and continuous motion to spin them out. The threads on the bolts should be chased to clean the majority of the threadlock off of them and clean them up. Same with the threaded holes. Starting the bolts is by hand to make sure they don't cross-thread.

Drilling out a broken steel bolt from an aluminum rim is going to be a major issue. Re-threading it with a bigger bolt will cause the weight to be off balance as it spins. It will be more difficult to balance it with the tire mounted. That really shouldn't be done, especially on the front rim. The rim should be replaced, unfortunately. And you have about a 0.01% chance of it being covered under warranty. It's not a defect, it's user-error. Especially since a certified Kawi Tech didn't work on it. So keep your expectations low on that.
 
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The initial plan was to get the rims powdercoated before installing the new tires so the rotors were coming off regardless. Tech at Yamaha dealer definitely told me the wrong info after I asked. Also the bolt broke on installation not removal. Thanks for the response
 

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The initial plan was to get the rims powdercoated before installing the new tires so the rotors were coming off regardless. Tech at Yamaha dealer definitely told me the wrong info after I asked. Also the bolt broke on installation not removal. Thanks for the response
OK, you're right about taking the rotors off for powdercoating then. If that was the intent, then sure, rotors off for that. And the wheel bearings too! The powdercoat high-temp oven used will cause the bearings to leak their oil and screw up everything. You need to pull the dust seals, wheel bearings, and the spacer. Those can't be reused after removal, since they are removed from the inner bearing race and will be damaged. You need a completely bear rim to powdercoat it, and make sure they mask off those areas correctly to not apply the powder there. Otherwise you'll never be able to install them since the powdercoat will tighten the clearances. Make sure that's done properly.
 

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If it's just a broken bolt, use a screw extractor to screw it out smooth. If the threads are stripped, then a buy new rim.
 

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Front or rear tire?

I had one break on me on a ninja 300 rear and I took it to a machinist to have a thread insert placed.
 

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Never take the rotors off for tire swaps. It’s best to keep them off for an accurate wheel balancing.

Next time a bolt feels that hard to remove, apply heat.

I had a bolt break on my BST front wheel. Extracted it, tapped it, zero issues.
 

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Never take the rotors off for tire swaps. It’s best to keep them off for an accurate wheel balancing.

Next time a bolt feels that hard to remove, apply heat.

I had a bolt break on my BST front wheel. Extracted it, tapped it, zero issues.
I think you meant keep them ON for an accurate wheel balance. ;)
 
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I completely agree with mte, always apply heat, an inexpensive propane torch is a great investment for this. Apply heat directly to the bolt head for 2-3 minutes. The bolt will come out easily. It takes very little torque to remove, once they are up to temperature.
Loctite "Red" releases at about 300 degrees, the Japanese "Red" releases about the same. Though it's locking properties seem much more aggressive standard Loctite Red. Years ago, I stripped/broke a couple on an old GSXR because I didn't heat them first.
As to the "fix" for your situation, I'd agree with the above suggestions. It might be more effective to just replace the wheel. If you can fix it yourself, different story. If you have to have it done, it may not be cost effective to have repaired.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Quick update, got the new rim and also ordered a few new bolts. The new rotor bolts went in to new rim easy with no unnecessary effort. The damaged rims threads are binding at the bottom interior portion of the bolt holes. The damaged rim was definitely over tightened either at factory or during dealer setup. Didn't even attempt to file warranty claim just chalked it up as a lemon. On the bright side, if I had the rims powder coated before I found this problem I would have been out more money.
 

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Quick update, got the new rim and also ordered a few new bolts. The new rotor bolts went in to new rim easy with no unnecessary effort. The damaged rims threads are binding at the bottom interior portion of the bolt holes. The damaged rim was definitely over tightened either at factory or during dealer setup. Didn't even attempt to file warranty claim just chalked it up as a lemon. On the bright side, if I had the rims powder coated before I found this problem I would have been out more money.
Glad the new rim worked out for ya. That's the best way to go. Did you loctite the new bolts in there like you should? A little blue loctite is fine for those.

By the way, the rotors are put on the rim at the factory with a computer-controlled torque wrench. The dealer wouldn't touch those during the prep for it. The loctite crumbled and fell to the bottom. Unless you cleaned that out, the bolt will compress that and cause some force. But it's a shouldered bolt torqued to 21 ft-lbs. That's not much, and the shoulder will bottom out before the bolt will. FYI.
 
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