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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
This is a little long but I appreciate anyone who reads it through and can offer some suggestions.

2017 ABS model.

Just did a front and rear tire change on my own and screwed something up.

From 85mph - 100mph the bike develops an increasing front end vibration. Below 85 it's not there. Haven't taken it above 100 due to the vibrations. The vibes are much worse on the decel down from 100-85.

The other issue it developed after the tire change is at low speeds I can hear a clacking sound. I can't isolate where it's coming from. The clacking may be occurring at all speeds but I can only hear it when I'm going slow. It's not constant at low speeds, but only when the suspension is moving. A light tap of the front OR REAR brake at 10mph induces the clacking briefly. Additionally riding down my gravel driveway at 10mph and it's very clackey.

The tires were balanced with dyna beads. I've had them on previous bikes with no issues.

Obviously the first place to look for the vibe would USUALLY be tire balance, but before I dismount the front tire and dump the beads everywhere I'm thinking there is something else I given the clacking sound showed up after the tire change too.

Could a damaged wheel bearing induce both of these issues? What about something going on with the forks? I followed the service manual and bounced the forks before torquing. Finally, what about a bent wheel? Suggestions from you?


Essentially I'm looking for an issue that would cause both of my problems to check first:

-Tire out of balance? Wouldn't cause the clacking I dont think?

-bent wheel? Wouldn't cause the clacking I dont think?

-wheel bearing issues?

-fork issues?

-something getting damaged in the ABS/wheel position sensor?

Help
 

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Discussion Starter #3
When was the last time you torqued the head bearings?
Never. But both of these issues showed up immediately after tire change. I did use a ratchet strap to hang the bike from the tripple tree so I could get it off of the front stand to remove the front wheel. Could that have cause an issue with the head bearings?
 

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Never. But both of these issues showed up immediately after tire change. I did use a ratchet strap to hang the bike from the tripple tree so I could get it off of the front stand to remove the front wheel. Could that have cause an issue with the head bearings?
Well, add that to your list of things to do. Since you hung it like that. you don't know what sort of tension was placed on the head. You should rebalance the wheel and torque the head bearings.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Well, add that to your list of things to do. Since you hung it like that. you don't know what sort of tension was placed on the head. You should rebalance the wheel and torque the head bearings.
So I'm looking through the manual for this, and what you're referring to is removing the steering stem head nut and then torquing down on the nut underneath that requires the special spanner wrench. Am I correct?
 

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Another option to get the front end off the ground is to use a rear stand and a jack under the gusset on the exhaust manifold. It's obviously prone to tipping the bike if you push the bike sideways but it's secure enough that I've done it at least 10 times for various reasons when servicing my front end. That includes torqueing my head bearings and replacing them altogether.
 

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So I'm looking through the manual for this, and what you're referring to is removing the steering stem head nut and then torquing down on the nut underneath that requires the special spanner wrench. Am I correct?
Yes, that's what Skydork is saying. You'll need an oddball torx socket to remove the Ohlins Damper first. The special spanner is also a little difficult to come by on short notice. I bought an adjustable style with a crescent wrench type adjustor and found that worked ok. You won't have a lot of room to work with once you get access to the locking rings. I think there's 2 of them?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Another option to get the front end off the ground is to use a rear stand and a jack under the gusset on the exhaust manifold. It's obviously prone to tipping the bike if you push the bike sideways but it's secure enough that I've done it at least 10 times for various reasons when servicing my front end. That includes torqueing my head bearings and replacing them altogether.
Just put some plywood between a floor jack and the exhaust manifold and itll hold? I feel like this is asking for another problem.

Does the front end need to be raised to tighten the steering head nut or only if it needs replaced?
 

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Yes, that's what Skydork is saying. You'll need an oddball torx socket to remove the Ohlins Damper first. The special spanner is also a little difficult to come by on short notice. I bought an adjustable style with a crescent wrench type adjustor and found that worked ok. You won't have a lot of room to work with once you get access to the locking rings. I think there's 2 of them?
Thanks for jumping in Porschenut!

Yes, that's what I was talking about. The Ohlins damper requires a T40 security torx bit to get off. Not really what I would consider "oddball", but the security bit is not found everywhere.


Just put some plywood between a floor jack and the exhaust manifold and itll hold? I feel like this is asking for another problem.

Does the front end need to be raised to tighten the steering head nut or only if it needs replaced?
I know what Prosche is talking about lifting the front, but I don't suggest that for this. You have to apply torque to the locking nut to get it off along with properly torquing the nut for the bearing. It can get unstable with that config.

Yes, you have to take the weight off the head to torque the nut properly. You should be using a head lift stand.
 

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Thanks for jumping in Porschenut!

Yes, that's what I was talking about. The Ohlins damper requires a T40 security torx bit to get off. Not really what I would consider "oddball", but the security bit is not found everywhere.




I know what Prosche is talking about lifting the front, but I don't suggest that for this. You have to apply torque to the locking nut to get it off along with properly torquing the nut for the bearing. It can get unstable with that config.

Yes, you have to take the weight off the head to torque the nut properly. You should be using a head lift stand.
I absolutely concur with Skydork. My floor jack method is not ideal at all but provides a solution in a pinch. I use a hockey puck between the jack and manifold (Canada eh!). I came close to tipping the bike one time and I've contemplated fabbing up a 2x4 bike cradle in the future if I'm doing anything more than removing the front wheel. I also thought about strapping the rear stand and swingarm together and then securing the stand to the ground so that the bike could not tip over.

I'm not trying to use my ingenuity for its own sake. I'm just being cheap. lol


Like Skydork said, buy Pitbull stand. I borrowed one for my fork re & re and it was pretty great.
 

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Just put some plywood between a floor jack and the exhaust manifold and itll hold? I feel like this is asking for another problem.

Does the front end need to be raised to tighten the steering head nut or only if it needs replaced?
You don't need to lift the front if you're just tightening the steering head.
 
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