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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

Forks are oily at 60,000 miles. Going to replace dust and oil seals with OEM.

Anything else I should do While they're apart? Like bushings?

44065-0026 BUSHING-FRONT FORK
44065-0038 BUSHING-FRONT FORK,SLIDE

Also, any good fluid recommendations?
 

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I replaced the bushings with K-tech
k-tech

FF slide bush** pair
44.70x20x1.50 (SBS-022)

FF guide bush pair
43x15x2.00 (GBS-019)

OEM oil and dust seals...

Repsol 5W (any good oil)
 

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Couple things to consider.

OEM or SKF oil and dust seals are best and last the longest. Make sure to grease both when you put them in.

You don't HAVE to change out the bushings, check the Teflon and see if it's worn. Otherwise there really is no benefit or performance gain to changing out bushings every time you change seals.

Inspect and polish your fork tubes for knicks.

Make sure both sets of o-rings on the cups are intact, otherwise you lose the seal in the tube and damping.

Inspect the valving shims. They have a tendency to distort and break over time on the BPF.

If you have stock valving, use the same viscosity oil that is recommended by the OEM. You'll save yourself the headache. If you want a bit performance gain, bump up to full synthetic and it will smooth out the valving feel,but make sure to keep the same viscosity.
 

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Redline makes great suspension fluid too. Again, be careful when choosing the proper viscosity. Manufacturer weights are sum what ambiguous. Silkolene Pro RSF 2.5 wt is comparable to Maxima 5 wt., go figure. Both Redline and Silkolene make great fully synthetic fluid, this last longer and changes less in viscosity concerning temperature ranges than non synthetic fluids.
 

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Redline makes great suspension fluid too. Again, be careful when choosing the proper viscosity. Manufacturer weights are sum what ambiguous. Silkolene Pro RSF 2.5 wt is comparable to Maxima 5 wt., go figure. Both Redline and Silkolene make great fully synthetic fluid, this last longer and changes less in viscosity concerning temperature ranges than non synthetic fluids.
In suspension full synthetic oils don't really "last longer" So many contaminates get into the oil it doesnt matter what one uses.

Also the thickness of oil is more important than synthetic vs non synthetics. Some of the most stable suspension oil out there is Silkolene RSF 2.5 which has a Viscosity Index of 464.00 and is not a synthetic oil. Motul Factory Line 2.5 is only 112 and is full synthetic. Silkolene Full Synthetic 02 is only 212 VI.

The biggest advantage of synthetic is how the oil feels as it flows through the valving. It smooths everything out. Thats why pretty much every aftermarket cartridge uses full synthetic.
 

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What do you recomend for gen4 ??? I use repsol 5w since its 10min from house

Enviado desde mi G3123 mediante Tapatalk
 

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I have repsol. Maxima close. By the way repsol is not sintetic

Enviado desde mi G3123 mediante Tapatalk
 

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Silkolene Rsf, synthetic technology, straight from their website. Whatever that means. Correct , viscosity index and viscosity are very important due to the increased heat that a shock creates. Less important in forks although due to the fact that most people don't change their suspension fluid nearly enough. Note that somebody was talking about 60,000 miles on their suspension fluid here, that's way too long in between service. This Viscosity index indicates how an oil will perform over a wide ranges of temperature change. Therefore I use an oil with a high VI in both fork and shock. Why not? The price is negligible. Hell, many people will do you a fork oil change and not even touch the shock. What sense does that make. Oil degrades so slowly over time you can't feel that the thing is working like shit. At least until the thing IS working like shit.
 

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That is great! :lol:

Think this will buff out?



How about the other fork from that set with the cap loc-tited to the rod and the spring retainer jammed and frozen into the adjuster?



It's not all gloom and doom though as I have had some really cool stuff come in lately too like these Moto2 forks
 

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I was asking about oils since, I noticed that Repsol 5w is not exactly the OEM, I had to go 2 turns clockwise more...
 

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One thing thats helped me with oils is to see that chart posted. Im sorry to be the lame ass who posts it, again, but I have found it useful.....

http://www.peterverdone.com/wiki/index.php?title=Suspension_Fluid

On the chart, you'll see a column that is labeled as "cSt". That is an abbreviation for "centistokes"

This is just a finer measurement than the typical "W" we use. Almost like measuring a board..Your measurement will be way more exact if you are able to measure that board in inches, vs only being able to measure it , in feet.

If you find the cSt number of the oil you like, its much easier to buy something thats similar, if not identical.
 

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Wow, You'd never think there were so many professional suspension tuners on just one motorcycle forum... :crackup:
Yep, that is exactly what all the professionals want you to think. It is so confusing nobody will ever figure it out. Just keep bringing your bike to the PROS so they can make it better. I have hung approx. 2,000 entry doors in my building career but I would be very naive to think that any homeowner/layman would ever be able to figure it out for themselves.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thanks Everybody! Looks like OEM seals are the way to go, and fluid is a bit more up for debate. Next up, Stem Bearings!
 

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Yep, that is exactly what all the professionals want you to think. It is so confusing nobody will ever figure it out. Just keep bringing your bike to the PROS so they can make it better. I have hung approx. 2,000 entry doors in my building career but I would be very naive to think that any homeowner/layman would ever be able to figure it out for themselves.
You are correct that people can figure out suspension, to an extent. But in your example, I would be willing to bet that yes I could install an entry door, but not as efficient or know all the intricacies needed to install it properly. Your fit and finish its going to be leaps and bounds above anything I could do.

The same can be said about suspension. There are things that you don't know or are privy to that "pros" know and/or understand. So while yes, you could certainly work on suspension, your "fit and finish" probably wont be to the level of a "pro" that does this every day.

LDH and I are entrenched in this subject matter every day. And I would be willing to bet he will agree that half the time is spent retraining people on the subject due to all the bad information out there and all the "suspension internet warriors".
 

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Yep, that is exactly what all the professionals want you to think.
I think he meant to say.. not all the professionals, just the "egocentric" ones.

LDH has a wealth of knowledge on suspensions but his contribution to the OP's question on suspension was a smart ass reply, not only, not addressing the original question but knocking people here on the forum that where trying to help.

I thought LDH's reply was dickish and not funny at all. Why not just try to help and
share his vast knowledge instead of knocking people or better yet just
don't post at all. We'll trudge through this suspension stuff without him.
 

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Ya, I was not trying to down play the information and skill that a Professional has obtained over the years. It is not like I think I am a professional when it comes to suspension. I do my best with the help of professionals in the field. Many Pros are willing to share knowledge and still be able to sell products, like Paul Thede. I think anything can be learned if there is a will to do it. I also think that if you are gonna be riding the bike, you should be the one turning the adjusters. It just takes time and testing to be able to feel the subtleties of a setting change.
 
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