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Is this new technology? Are they just doing R&D or do they expect to be competative?
Possibly all the above,Rossi & his teammate allready are running the engine if not mistaken.Know the satelite team is getting to try it out.
 

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Do you have any idea how it works?

Pneumatic valve springs are metal bellows filled with compressed air[1] occupying roughly the same space of metal springs used to close valves in high-speed internal combustion engines.

Reducing the number of moving parts that can fail is good engineering. Racing engines often failed at high speeds because mechanical springs were unable to close valves fast enough, leading to engine failure when pistons struck incompletely closed valves. Renault's innovation was to replace steel springs with light weight compressed air bellows that could respond more quickly and reduce the possibility of valve crashes, other than from leaking bellows. Additionally, the amount of seat tension required to keep a coil sprung valve under control results in peak lift loading drastically higher, with added stress to the entire valvetrain as a result. Pneumatic systems, sharing a common reservoir of pressure retain a more static level of force, controlling the valve effectively, without any attendant peak lift load increase. To avoid bellows failures, air springs are replaced often
 

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La Flama Blanca
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Pneumatic valve springs are metal bellows filled with compressed air[1] occupying roughly the same space of metal springs used to close valves in high-speed internal combustion engines.

Reducing the number of moving parts that can fail is good engineering. Racing engines often failed at high speeds because mechanical springs were unable to close valves fast enough, leading to engine failure when pistons struck incompletely closed valves. Renault's innovation was to replace steel springs with light weight compressed air bellows that could respond more quickly and reduce the possibility of valve crashes, other than from leaking bellows. Additionally, the amount of seat tension required to keep a coil sprung valve under control results in peak lift loading drastically higher, with added stress to the entire valvetrain as a result. Pneumatic systems, sharing a common reservoir of pressure retain a more static level of force, controlling the valve effectively, without any attendant peak lift load increase. To avoid bellows failures, air springs are replaced often
:heyyou: Where'd you copy and paste this from?

F-1 cars have been using the technology for years now, it alows the engines to achieve stratospheric rpm, F-1 cars run close to 20,000 RPM, from a V8.

Early systems were plaqed with unreliability (leaking bellows)but its pretty proven technology now.
 

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I wonder why it's just now getting into MotoGP technology. Is there any power advantages to this design or is it strictly for reliability?
 

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I wonder why it's just now getting into MotoGP technology. Is there any power advantages to this design or is it strictly for reliability?
I am wondering that as well Andy, I also wander if there are any possibilities of the same "floating" with the bellows valve as there are with standard valves.:dontknow:
 

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Well, I would say there is huge gains to be had, any time you can extend the rev range of the engine out to that extreme, thats got to be huge.
 

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I thought Kawi's screamer motor already used this technology as well...
 

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YOu can have more rpms. More rpms =more power = higher top seed.

This year Yamaha already has the same top speed as Ducati
 
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