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Like most topics this one has been covered more than enough so pease forgive me for asking I just really want to hear someone's advice and opinions please. So my question is, does the dam thing actually work? I cam hear it kind of chatter if you will when I turn it on. One time I had it off and in my hand but still plugged in and I cycled the key on and yes it does stiffin up and stuff! The thing is I've been in many 100 mph wheelies and leaned over hard at high speeds and all those type of situations and have had the front end do a little dance or whiggle on me that my previous bikes would not do with there mechanical stabilizers! Another thing is I've done as much research as I feel I can and alot of cats seem to say the are junk and replace them with a gpr or whatever kind of stabilizer ya know..... My bike is a 2017 zx10r non abs US model if that makes any difference. I really appreciate any and all opinions my riding brothers and sisters!
 

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I know it's comparing apples to oranges but I went from an 05 zx10r to my 18 zx10r and it's night and day difference.. my old 05 front end would constantly be shaking anytime I do some hard acceleration on a less than perfect road. My 18 I just got broken in and have been hammering down and have yet to get into a tank slapper. anecdotal evidence but I haven't had anything sketchy happen (yet) so good enough for me to say it works. lol
 

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I don't like the ESD and replaced it with a revalved manual damper on both my '14 and my '16. I even tried the race SCU which made it better but I just don't like not being able to adjust the amount of damping to my personal preference and you have no control over that with ESD. Does it work? Yes. Do I like it? No.
 

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Like most topics this one has been covered more than enough so pease forgive me for asking I just really want to hear someone's advice and opinions please. So my question is, does the dam thing actually work? I cam hear it kind of chatter if you will when I turn it on. One time I had it off and in my hand but still plugged in and I cycled the key on and yes it does stiffin up and stuff! The thing is I've been in many 100 mph wheelies and leaned over hard at high speeds and all those type of situations and have had the front end do a little dance or whiggle on me that my previous bikes would not do with there mechanical stabilizers! Another thing is I've done as much research as I feel I can and alot of cats seem to say the are junk and replace them with a gpr or whatever kind of stabilizer ya know..... My bike is a 2017 zx10r non abs US model if that makes any difference. I really appreciate any and all opinions my riding brothers and sisters!

Just go to a manual its much better, the RACE SCU is not worth it to be honest didnt change much . I went right to a manual Ohlins i like to be able to control my settings.
 

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The stock ESD on a 2016+ ZX10R is frightfully weak. While I've never had a tank slapper on THIS bike, I sure as hell have had my front dancing, especially under hard acceleration. Is it better than nothing, absolutely yes!

I've heard the Race SCU is noticeably better, contrary to CLCRacingLos's statement. Not tried it myself, so ...
 

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I'll be the voice of dissent here.

If you're using a steering damper because you think it "feels funny" in different situations, then welcome to riding a single-tracked vehicle like a motorcycle. If you haven't gone through the geometry setup and suspension settings to figure out what it's doing things and how to make it better, then adding a damper will just mask it and make it "feel" better.

I've landed 100mph+ wheelies, been to top-end on the bike, have the ass-end elevated 6mm over stock, put my knee down, etc. on my '16 KRT. All with the stock suspension and stock stabilizer. One of my routes that I ride has me going over a railroad crossing in a mild turn with moderate lean angle. I usually wheelie it over that while leaned a bit. No biggie.

Yes, the bike moves around a bit in certain scenarios, but NOTHING that makes it unsafe or anything that I thought "holy crap, I wish I could lock the front steering tighter". The damper is to prevent divergent oscillations in the front, not make it feel more planted. If the oscillations dampen themselves out and are not divergent in nature, then the damper isn't going to help. It's not something you can feel just moving the damper in your hand.

Quick means unstable. Stable means slow. There's a point of optimum correlation between those two things that you try to achieve in anything so you can be as stable as possible so it's controllable without making it too stable. If you've gotten all the other settings dialed in to the point where you're experiencing divergent tank slappers, then you can move onto the damper and worry about that. Otherwise, put your efforts into where it should be and don't worry about the damper.
 

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The damper is part of your suspension. You just said you like go through the rest of your suspension and set it up to perform just how you like it. Why should the damper be any different and not allow you to adjust it where "you" like it? Why not just buy the entire suspension factory set to a specific "correct" setting? That's right, there isn't a "correct" setting. It's different for every rider for every different condition.
 

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Upgrading to a mechanical will be an improvement. However, I have an '18 and still have the ESD. My previous bike GSXR1000 had a mechanical and I will say I had less head shake on the GSXR. However, with the ESD I have not had a tank slapper and have had many sketch situations with some violent head shakes. Worst was on track and picked up a damn screw and got a flat rear. Knee down coming out of corner the bike kicked out and threw me on tank and shook violently but never tank slap! Point is the damper did it's job. On track with smooth rider inputs very rarely do I notice or say to myself "man I wish the steering was stiffer". I did find the rear shock way too soft and added a ton of preload which helped. Replacing rear shock is in future but like others have said setting the bike up for your style and skill level will help more then a mechanical. Personally I would say spend the $300 plus bucks on suspension setup instead of a damper but just my opinion...
 

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The damper is part of your suspension. You just said you like go through the rest of your suspension and set it up to perform just how you like it. Why should the damper be any different and not allow you to adjust it where "you" like it? Why not just buy the entire suspension factory set to a specific "correct" setting? That's right, there isn't a "correct" setting. It's different for every rider for every different condition.

Yes! My point was only that the damper lately has become a one-size-fits-all solution to an apparent problem. The tuning part should include everything, but so many times people seem to think it's the cure-all and take the easy, quickest way to bandaid the bike movement by saying the damper sucks or trying to make it tighter. My other post was only an attempt to start by making sure the geometry and suspension is proper and tune the damper after that and as part of that. It certainly should be done differently for everyone, but it seems like it would be quicker and easier to just make sure you land the wheelie without it being crossed-up instead of changing out the damper to stop the head movement. :wink:
 

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I'll be the voice of dissent here.

If you're using a steering damper because you think it "feels funny" in different situations, then welcome to riding a single-tracked vehicle like a motorcycle. If you haven't gone through the geometry setup and suspension settings to figure out what it's doing things and how to make it better, then adding a damper will just mask it and make it "feel" better.

I've landed 100mph+ wheelies, been to top-end on the bike, have the ass-end elevated 6mm over stock, put my knee down, etc. on my '16 KRT. All with the stock suspension and stock stabilizer. One of my routes that I ride has me going over a railroad crossing in a mild turn with moderate lean angle. I usually wheelie it over that while leaned a bit. No biggie.

Yes, the bike moves around a bit in certain scenarios, but NOTHING that makes it unsafe or anything that I thought "holy crap, I wish I could lock the front steering tighter". The damper is to prevent divergent oscillations in the front, not make it feel more planted. If the oscillations dampen themselves out and are not divergent in nature, then the damper isn't going to help. It's not something you can feel just moving the damper in your hand.

Quick means unstable. Stable means slow. There's a point of optimum correlation between those two things that you try to achieve in anything so you can be as stable as possible so it's controllable without making it too stable. If you've gotten all the other settings dialed in to the point where you're experiencing divergent tank slappers, then you can move onto the damper and worry about that. Otherwise, put your efforts into where it should be and don't worry about the damper.

I'm with SkyDork.

This is a short video from my 2016 ZX10R with the stock ESD. I have a KTech DDS Pro and revalved stock forks. The bike is sprung for my weight and the clickers are about 90% where I want them.

1) this is was literally the third lap of the day, I wasn't pushing or doing anything aggressive. Just warming up the mind and body.
2) the ESD is what you make it. If you need the wheels perfectly inline at all times, you might need to look at the bike as a whole and consider how it needs to be setup to achieve this.
3) When you add a manual dampener to the steer of any motorcycle, you don't just control unwanted head shakes, you also start effecting the bikes steering into/out of corners. This can be a problem when you get faster (on a race track anyway).

My 2006 R6 with a built KWS motor putting out over 135hp had a GPR V3 steering damper that would basically get in the way of my efforts to enter a corner. I had it turned down to the second lowest setting to keep in turning fast. And it liked to shake it's head coming down from a wheelie, but I valued the faster steering more.

My 2009 R1 with a stock ESD had zero head shake issues. Never. Period. It's geometry is setup in such a way that it likes to keep the wheels inline during acceleration. I upgraded the ESD to an Ohlins manual dampener but again turned in to the loser side of the settings so it wouldn't hinder steering.

On this Gen5 ZX10R, I will most likely be going to the Ohlins Race ESD. Frankly, it's not a problem for me if the head is wagging around. I understand that it's that type of bike and because I need the steering to be as fast as it can be, I don't dare interfere with the natural tendency of this machine.

The point is basically, get what you need, but at the end of the day the bike will do what it's setup to do. If you want a fast steering ZX10, you will have to deal with headshake. It'll buck and weave and snap because it's a beast. I'm just going to ride mine how she wants to be ridden. >:)

Just my 2 cents...:hello:
 

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9-CJ7Vjynts

I'm with SkyDork.

This is a short video from my 2016 ZX10R with the stock ESD. I have a KTech DDS Pro and revalved stock forks. The bike is sprung for my weight and the clickers are about 90% where I want them.

1) this is was literally the third lap of the day, I wasn't pushing or doing anything aggressive. Just warming up the mind and body.
2) the ESD is what you make it. If you need the wheels perfectly inline at all times, you might need to look at the bike as a whole and consider how it needs to be setup to achieve this.
3) When you start adding a external dampener to the steer of any motorcycle you don't just control unwanted head shakes, you also start effecting the bikes steering into/out of corners. This can be a problem when you get faster (on a race track anyway).

My 2006 R6 with a built KWS motor putting out over 135hp had a GPR V3 steering damper that would basically get in the way of my efforts to enter a corner. I had it turned down to the second lowest setting to keep in turning fast. And it liked to shake it's head coming down from a wheelie.

My 2009 R1 with a stock ESD had zero head shake issues. Never. Period. It's geometry is setup in such a way that it likes to keep the wheels inline during acceleration. I upgraded the ESD to an Ohlins manual dampener but again turned in to the loser side of the settings.

On this Gen5 ZX10R, I will most likely be going to the Ohlins Race ESD. Frankly, it's not a problem for me if the head is wagging around. I understand that it's that type of bike and because I need the steering to be as fast as it can be, I don't dare interfere with the natural tendency of this machine.

The point is basically, get what you need, but at the end of the day the bike will do what it's setup to do. If you want a fast steering ZX10, you will have to deal with headshake. It'll buck and weave and snap because it's a beast. I'm just going to ride mine how she wants to be ridden. >:)

Just my 2 cents...:hello:

I was following along, but you lost me at the "external dampener" statement. :shady: :lol:


Don't get me wrong here. You and tdh are both riding the bikes in a zone where the need for an external damper can be a useful addition to keep things under control as needed. I'm with you both in that regard and have no discussion points against that. I'm right there with you guys in terms of what can be done under the right circumstances. I'm just trying to lay out a different scenario to the vast majority of the people who read these types of threads. :eek:ccasion1
 

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I was following along, but you lost me at the "external dampener" statement. :shady: :lol:


Don't get me wrong here. You and tdh are both riding the bikes in a zone where the need for an external damper can be a useful addition to keep things under control as needed. I'm with you both in that regard and have no discussion points against that. I'm right there with you guys in terms of what can be done under the right circumstances. I'm just trying to lay out a different scenario to the vast majority of the people who read these types of threads. :eek:ccasion1
:iamwithstupid: Hahaha, auto correct has failed me! I meant manual dampener...

The basic thought for everyone to take away from this is this: headshake is a chassis setup issue and a dampener can only do a certain amount before it starts to get in the way of other things. Most of the time, headshakes are rider induced, so work on riding better IMHO. 90% of what needs to happen with steering a bike is below the waist. That last 10% from the hands is just the icing on the cake! :helmet: That video I posted was simply to show what happens with the Gen5 ZX10R with factory geometry. If I had moved the setting more toward a quicker turn-in, the shakes would be worse. It's a game of compromises.

My preference is to have a loose dampener (like the stock ESD). Mostly because I don't mind the shakes and need the fastest steering I can get, but also to point out when I'm loading the bars too much with my upper body. :badteeth:
 

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Ive done almost 1k miles on my 10RR with the ESD, and ive only has one lil head shake, prior to the Ohlins rear shock. SInce then I have had no issues on the street. Ill let you know ho wit works on the track. I have a manual one on the bench ready to go.

By comparison, the first mod (and only mod) to the BMW was an Ohlins damper. That thing tried to kill me everyitme i rode it with the factory damper (non-Esd)
 

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Like most topics this one has been covered more than enough so pease forgive me for asking I just really want to hear someone's advice and opinions please. So my question is, does the dam thing actually work? I cam hear it kind of chatter if you will when I turn it on. One time I had it off and in my hand but still plugged in and I cycled the key on and yes it does stiffin up and stuff! The thing is I've been in many 100 mph wheelies and leaned over hard at high speeds and all those type of situations and have had the front end do a little dance or whiggle on me that my previous bikes would not do with there mechanical stabilizers! Another thing is I've done as much research as I feel I can and alot of cats seem to say the are junk and replace them with a gpr or whatever kind of stabilizer ya know..... My bike is a 2017 zx10r non abs US model if that makes any difference. I really appreciate any and all opinions my riding brothers and sisters!

In my experience having owned the gen4 and currently on the gen5, the electronic one is trash. I've been doing trackdays since 2010 and I've been racing since 2015 with CCS. The mechanical one is the way to go, it gives you better adjustment to your liking. I've had plenty of incidents where the electronic one should've worked and it didn't. And the rest of my suspension is set up properly for the track I ride and the speed I ride at. If I was you I would switch to a mechanical one.
 

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I'm with SkyDork.

This is a short video from my 2016 ZX10R with the stock ESD. I have a KTech DDS Pro and revalved stock forks. The bike is sprung for my weight and the clickers are about 90% where I want them.

1) this is was literally the third lap of the day, I wasn't pushing or doing anything aggressive. Just warming up the mind and body.
2) the ESD is what you make it. If you need the wheels perfectly inline at all times, you might need to look at the bike as a whole and consider how it needs to be setup to achieve this.
3) When you add a manual dampener to the steer of any motorcycle, you don't just control unwanted head shakes, you also start effecting the bikes steering into/out of corners. This can be a problem when you get faster (on a race track anyway).

My 2006 R6 with a built KWS motor putting out over 135hp had a GPR V3 steering damper that would basically get in the way of my efforts to enter a corner. I had it turned down to the second lowest setting to keep in turning fast. And it liked to shake it's head coming down from a wheelie, but I valued the faster steering more.

My 2009 R1 with a stock ESD had zero head shake issues. Never. Period. It's geometry is setup in such a way that it likes to keep the wheels inline during acceleration. I upgraded the ESD to an Ohlins manual dampener but again turned in to the loser side of the settings so it wouldn't hinder steering.

On this Gen5 ZX10R, I will most likely be going to the Ohlins Race ESD. Frankly, it's not a problem for me if the head is wagging around. I understand that it's that type of bike and because I need the steering to be as fast as it can be, I don't dare interfere with the natural tendency of this machine.

The point is basically, get what you need, but at the end of the day the bike will do what it's setup to do. If you want a fast steering ZX10, you will have to deal with headshake. It'll buck and weave and snap because it's a beast. I'm just going to ride mine how she wants to be ridden. >:)

Just my 2 cents...:hello:


Hello,
Quick question for you. How do you get your tachometer to blink in a sweeping motion? I am assuming it just came stock like that. I have an 2018 ZX10r and mine stay solid and no option to have them blink with a sweeping motion. From what i am gathering the 2018 didn't come with this option. Thanks!
 

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Hello,
Quick question for you. How do you get your tachometer to blink in a sweeping motion? I am assuming it just came stock like that. I have an 2018 ZX10r and mine stay solid and no option to have them blink with a sweeping motion. From what i am gathering the 2018 didn't come with this option. Thanks!
Turn the key to the on position without starting the bike, hold the select button for 3 or 5 seconds like you would to enter the menu, and start scrolling through it until you get to the tachometer option. From there you should be able to select it and change it reacts when it gets to the appropriate range for shifting. It should have 3 different speeds of flashing.
 

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It still only does that when it's time for it to shift, I am pretty sure he is talking about the always rolling appearance that it has due to the camera fps not matching the led refresh rate. I already answered this in a thread he started about it. The flashing for a shift notification is not the sweeping
 
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