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Discussion Starter #1
I am running q3 on the zx10r and yesterday i pull out the bike out of the garage and saw my rear all blueish on the side, i had this only 1-2 time in the past with the zx6r but this time its a lot worse.

From what i read its after a big heat cycle and oil is coming at the surface,is the tire really overheated or its normal ?

Is it still ok for doing a trackday?

this was done on the street with 32 front 34 rear hot, about 300 miles of twisties and outside temp was about 75*

what do you think?



 

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Your tires are fine and that bluing is more typical of a track tire after sitting from the heat cycles. It will wear off within a few miles and be right back to normal. From my experience though, if you let it sit for a few weeks and allow the bluing to settle then the tire will be very slick for a while before it returns to normal dependent on how much rubber you have left.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The tire has about 1500 miles on it, it has sit 4-5 days like this in the garage and i rode the same run yesterday and the tire was feeling normal and the blue was gone now.
 

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Your pressure's are to high especially in the rear. If you use tire warmer's at the track dunlop says 30f 28R hot off the warmers. If I don't use warmers at the track I run 30 front and rear and then check my pressures after the second session as the pressure rises. The dunlops are very pressure sensitive. I started spinning up my rear tire last track day in the third session and found that the rear pressure had risen to 34 I set it back to 30 and no more spinning up the tire on corner exit.
 

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Tons of life left in that one for sure. And just to mirror what Techx said I start at 28f 27r cold on my GSXR 750 at the track and go from there. I dont use warmers either.
 

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Just curious on why you are running more pressure in the rear?
Maybe you guys can help clear something up here for me. As far as I know, I have always run more pressure in the rear per the manual and what many other people have said and done as I was learning to ride over the years but mostly per the manual. Are you guys running more pressure in the front than the rear?? Whats the different effect? I have never tried running more psi in the front, my front is always lower.
And TechX, you think 34 is high for street? I usually wont go lower than around 30 but then again I only ride street.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Guys this was 100% STREET riding, i tough my pressure was on the lower side for the street, but this is agressive riding for sure!

When i commute i usually run 34 front and 36-38 rear HOT , when i hit the twisties i lower to 32 front-34 rear HOT and the bike really feel planted to the ground, i never experienced any slippage feel but the tc do kick in a lot but its all fine in term of feeling.

i was just concerned about the blueish, so for the street do you still suggest to lower my rear a little like 32 front-32 rear hot ?

thanks !
 

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I run 32f and 32b due to a very nice Cali.:grin2: weather but I'll go to 30f and 30b when the weather hits 90 degree and up.... we average 105 in the summer time and can go as high as 115 degree..:crying: Don't worry about the blue tint... that's just means you ran a good/hard consistence pace.:wink2:
 

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Guys this was 100% STREET riding, i tough my pressure was on the lower side for the street, but this is agressive riding for sure!

When i commute i usually run 34 front and 36-38 rear HOT , when i hit the twisties i lower to 32 front-34 rear HOT and the bike really feel planted to the ground, i never experienced any slippage feel but the tc do kick in a lot but its all fine in term of feeling.

i was just concerned about the blueish, so for the street do you still suggest to lower my rear a little like 32 front-32 rear hot ?

thanks !
For street use 32f 32r are good pressures and will work fine. 34 f and 36-38 pressures are if you have a passenger for solo riding their to high. Track day will generate more heat in the tire therefore causing the pressure to rise more than on a street ride.
 

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Maybe you guys can help clear something up here for me. As far as I know, I have always run more pressure in the rear per the manual and what many other people have said and done as I was learning to ride over the years but mostly per the manual. Are you guys running more pressure in the front than the rear?? Whats the different effect? I have never tried running more psi in the front, my front is always lower.
And TechX, you think 34 is high for street? I usually wont go lower than around 30 but then again I only ride street.

Having more pressure in the rear use to be the norm but with improved tire technology the pressure's in the rear have gone down in comparison to past tires. You would probably be ok with 34 for street use. I found at track day that the additional heat being generated at track day pace caused the pressure in the rear to rise to 34 which started the tire losing some traction on corner exit, on the street I don't think you would have that problem simply because your not trying to get to full throttle as quickly as possible.
 

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Guys this was 100% STREET riding, i tough my pressure was on the lower side for the street, but this is agressive riding for sure!

When i commute i usually run 34 front and 36-38 rear HOT , when i hit the twisties i lower to 32 front-34 rear HOT and the bike really feel planted to the ground, i never experienced any slippage feel but the tc do kick in a lot but its all fine in term of feeling.

i was just concerned about the blueish, so for the street do you still suggest to lower my rear a little like 32 front-32 rear hot ?

thanks !
There you go. Street riding, not track riding, is what the OP was on about. Yes, you want to run a higher pressure in the rear tire for street riding. 34 psi is too low, though. Guys think running near-track pressures on the street is a good idea, no, it's not. When you ride on the track the pressure builds up very quickly because you are riding a lot harder than you could ever ride on the street, anybody says different they are smoking crack or have never ridden on the track. Rear tire is LOWER on the track because it's the one putting power down, thus it gets a LOT hotter than the front, real quick. No way we are going to get the rear that hot on the street.

32F/36R is the lowest I'd go for street riding; all you are gonna do is burn down a $200 tire a lot faster running anything lower.

I've tried a boatload of pressure combinations for the street and truth is, 34F/40R actually is very good for the type of riding I've been doing. The tire manufacturers are not wrong and these latest radials have so much grip due to construction of the carcass and the type of dual-compound rubber that grip is excellent. Now I do say that is to accommodate 130 miles of freeway riding on my "loop" of 230 miles but the 100 miles of twists do not suffer, even with TC OFF.

If it were just twists, I'd run 33F/37R for the street. Front tire gets mushy at 32 psi under hard braking on the street.

For track I run 30F/28R to start but I am light, 140 pounds.

Too low a pressure on the street leads to bent rims, tire damage, premature wear, overheating, all kinds of fun stuff.

So to answer your question, DO NOT run 32 psi in the rear tire. Why not send a question about this to Dunlop? Samantha over there is really up on the tech stuff, I just asked her about mixing tires. That's another no-no, you don't do it.
 

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There you go. Street riding, not track riding, is what the OP was on about. Yes, you want to run a higher pressure in the rear tire for street riding. 34 psi is too low, though. Guys think running near-track pressures on the street is a good idea, no, it's not. When you ride on the track the pressure builds up very quickly because you are riding a lot harder than you could ever ride on the street, anybody says different they are smoking crack or have never ridden on the track. Rear tire is LOWER on the track because it's the one putting power down, thus it gets a LOT hotter than the front, real quick. No way we are going to get the rear that hot on the street.

32F/36R is the lowest I'd go for street riding; all you are gonna do is burn down a $200 tire a lot faster running anything lower.

I've tried a boatload of pressure combinations for the street and truth is, 34F/40R actually is very good for the type of riding I've been doing. The tire manufacturers are not wrong and these latest radials have so much grip due to construction of the carcass and the type of dual-compound rubber that grip is excellent. Now I do say that is to accommodate 130 miles of freeway riding on my "loop" of 230 miles but the 100 miles of twists do not suffer, even with TC OFF.

If it were just twists, I'd run 33F/37R for the street. Front tire gets mushy at 32 psi under hard braking on the street.

For track I run 30F/28R to start but I am light, 140 pounds.

Too low a pressure on the street leads to bent rims, tire damage, premature wear, overheating, all kinds of fun stuff.

So to answer your question, DO NOT run 32 psi in the rear tire. Why not send a question about this to Dunlop? Samantha over there is really up on the tech stuff, I just asked her about mixing tires. That's another no-no, you don't do it.
This was my thinking as well about the track riding making the rear hotter.

Also agree that anything under 32 on either tire for me on street and things get a little funky. Seems either hit or miss, they either feel great or get sketchy/warbly coming in hot trail braking to an apex. Cant put a finger on it other than its just a bit more unpredictable when itll bite and how hard. That's my take on it anyway. Also think it depends on how my susp. is set up. Seems like I can feel the tire differently with different comp./rebound settings as well as the combos act differently with lots or little psi and lots or little comp. damping.

Cant remember what my street limit is as I keep most shit written down but I think 30/32 was that funky edge and most psi's above that feel great. 32/34 is good for me usually and probably depending on the day/temp/etc... I can run that 30/32 but its iffy and depends on many conditions.
 

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So my question was..... why would you ever want to run higher pressure in the rear tire than in the front? Only logical explanation is to get more mileage out of the tire?

I get a lot of newbies that come out to the track (yes i know....track), most haven't checked tire pressure from leaving a dealership or whoever changed their tire. And when adjusting, they always make sure the front is lower than the rear which is ridiculous....yes for the track. When I ask why... I get the same response EVERY single time why..... it's "Don't you need more grip in the front for the turns?". I don't even have to comment on this....

Yes tires get hot at the track, I have dunlops that run 17 hot in the rear, a little more extreme comparing to other brands and even other dunlops, but even on street tires for weekend riding, I will continue to run a little less in the rear regardless until I feel otherwise. It's been about 10 years since I have replaced a rear tire due to it being worn down in the center anyway, even on my streetbikes including my lowered and stretched busa from 06-08.
 

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I agree with Slo my Gen 4 is street ridden more than track and I run 31f 31r cold. I have never had a problem with wearing out a tire prematurely. Higher pressures reduce sidewall flex which help the tire grip. If you prefer less grip than crank up the pressures. The tire makers will give you track pressures but will be politically correct by telling you to use the pressures that the bike maker recommends. You know the sticker on your swing arm.
 

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So my question was..... why would you ever want to run higher pressure in the rear tire than in the front? Only logical explanation is to get more mileage out of the tire?

I get a lot of newbies that come out to the track (yes i know....track), most haven't checked tire pressure from leaving a dealership or whoever changed their tire. And when adjusting, they always make sure the front is lower than the rear which is ridiculous....yes for the track. When I ask why... I get the same response EVERY single time why..... it's "Don't you need more grip in the front for the turns?". I don't even have to comment on this....

Yes tires get hot at the track, I have dunlops that run 17 hot in the rear, a little more extreme comparing to other brands and even other dunlops, but even on street tires for weekend riding, I will continue to run a little less in the rear regardless until I feel otherwise. It's been about 10 years since I have replaced a rear tire due to it being worn down in the center anyway, even on my streetbikes including my lowered and stretched busa from 06-08.
My take, anyone running track pressures on the street, that's a race fantasy. Better get Marquez to autograph your helmet, that's just as likely to make you fast as running "track pressures" on the street.

So back at the OP, if you want to see what's what, go ahead, run your rear tire real low like the smart guys do, get out on the freeway like you need to be somewhere (as real human beings do) and then check the pressure rise soon as you get home. Check the temperature too if you have an infrared gun. See if you like that. Contact Dunlop and see what they say when you tell them what the pressure rise was and if it is safe. They will get right back to you, they are good that way.

Basically why listen to a bunch of clowns on the Internet when Dunlop is RIGHT THERE WAITING to answer your questions?
 

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I agree with Slo my Gen 4 is street ridden more than track and I run 31f 31r cold. I have never had a problem with wearing out a tire prematurely. Higher pressures reduce sidewall flex which help the tire grip. If you prefer less grip than crank up the pressures. The tire makers will give you track pressures but will be politically correct by telling you to use the pressures that the bike maker recommends. You know the sticker on your swing arm.
That's a pretty fair statement. On one of my little infamous loops which piss off so many guys (LOL) I can be on a twisty road in less than one mile from my driveway, so if I am just riding that road which is about 30-mile round trip, I'll set the pressures 32F/36R. But that is just for that short ride. Now if I am continuing my ride and doing the 130 miles of freeway necessary to get to the 100 miles of the best twists in the state, I'll run 34F/40R. Works like a charm. You try hitting a piece of metal or a piece of tread from a truck tire, or a big divot in the freeway at 80-90 mph (normal FWY speed around here) with 31 psi in your rear tire. You may bust a rim, blow a tire. It happens. Had a big chunk of loose truck tire tread roll out right in front of me yesterday, just missed it. Heavy freeway traffic.

Also just missed a nice-sized rattlesnake way up on my good twisty high-speed route. You just never know. I know a guy, he was snakebit when dirtriding when he ran down a rattler and it flung up into his lap. Dam near died from it. That was the spookiest thing that happened all day.

Tire pressures, you better think things through. Best to talk to the tire maker, not to Internet experts, myself included.:idea:
 

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My take, anyone running track pressures on the street, that's a race fantasy. Better get Marquez to autograph your helmet, that's just as likely to make you fast as running "track pressures" on the street.

So back at the OP, if you want to see what's what, go ahead, run your rear tire real low like the smart guys do, get out on the freeway like you need to be somewhere (as real human beings do) and then check the pressure rise soon as you get home. Check the temperature too if you have an infrared gun. See if you like that. Contact Dunlop and see what they say when you tell them what the pressure rise was and if it is safe. They will get right back to you, they are good that way.

Basically why listen to a bunch of clowns on the Internet when Dunlop is RIGHT THERE WAITING to answer your questions?
I don't think anyone has mentioned to run track pressures on the street? Not sure where you are reading that. My question still remains though, why run higher pressure in the rear, not equal or how much....but why higher.
 

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I don't think anyone has mentioned to run track pressures on the street? Not sure where you are reading that. My question still remains though, why run higher pressure in the rear, not equal or how much....but why higher.
I mentioned before, you may bust a rim, blow a tire. It happens. Had a big chunk of loose truck tire tread roll out right in front of me yesterday, just missed it. Heavy freeway traffic. Not to mention the odd rattlesnake.

Another real important reason is that running higher pressures in the drive tire will drop the incidents of picking up nails, staples, spikes and other pesky stuff that causes flats. Makes the whole "structure" of the tire more durable and able to cast off that stuff.

Also street riding is so full of variables, for example, someone might be thinking they are out for a short ride and then run into a bunch of buddies who want to turn it into a 300-mile day with a lot more freeway than we thought. Now we are burning along the fwy at 85 and that rear tire is getting real hot. I've checked my pressures after getting home at various starting pressures and found that even with a touring tire (Roadsmart II) the pressure rise was much higher than acceptable, which means I started out with too LOW a pressure.

On the street all kinds of things happen, plans change, some guys pick up their girlfriend which adds a load to rear (which carries most of the weight and drive load), and so on.

I guess if a guy knew exactly what his ride was gonna be the lower pressures wouldn't be so much a concern if he stuck to the plan, but then there are still the factors of tire/wheel damage, picking up punctures, and so on.

Your recommended pressures of about 35-42 psi are going to have you covered, it's like insurance. I ride alone, far from cell service and AAA. I carry four little canisters of CO2 and a tubeless tire repair tool just in case, also. Enough to get me home, hopefully. I've ridden home with a nail in the tire, too, when I had no way to plug it.

As I think about it I am talking about street bikes on real street rides, rather than hanging at the water hole and zipping up and down the Dragon or the Snake or the Worm or the Zipper or whatever the road is where guys have to prove themselves. I never go to those places any more anyhow. Far from the madding crowd for me. But each to his own, I did that shit for about 25 years...so no hypocrisy, just changing desires.

Tell ya one more thing, those guys with their tires all used to the very edge, they get that way on the street by lowering the tire pressure. On the track, I get zero chicken strip on the rear, because it's at 27 pounds or so. On the street I got 1/8" on my GSX-R 750, 1/2" on the Ninja, which is another kind of insurance but also 'cause I run 33/39 in the Gixxer, 34/40 in the Kawi.:helmet:
 
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