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scuff the new rear tire with a mouse sander and some 400 grit sandpaper, thats what I always do, no way they could have been that slippery, either something on the road or you just spun the tire
 

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yeah id never burn out on a brand new tyre... Ive never had any problems with brand new tyres after they are installed i just scrub them in doing the ole weaving back and forth method i usually get both tyres to slide the first time i do it but nothing that would cause ya to go down... Good rule of thumb though is take it easy untill you get some heat in the tyres...
 

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A wipe mine down and on the rear put it in gear with a rag on the tire to get most of the oil off.
 

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burnouts, beltsanders, sandpaper..... Are you guys serious?!?!?

I change my own tires so i don't worry about some kid with shit for brains going crazy mounting lube. Then i gradually work in more lean angle. 20-30 miles she's ready to go (confidence up). On the track...two laps.

..beltsanders... Wow.
:+1:
 

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Discussion Starter · #48 ·
I am still at The University of Alabama and they seem to repaint the roads every semester. The white crosswalks will cause the rear to slip at just about any speed. Is it possible that you hit some new paint also?
I got my pegs and the bike put back together today and took her back out. Still need to get fairings but back together good enough for riding. Good call on the paint. I see where my tire went. There is a big fat white band of paint along with the two more narrow cross walk lines. I ride across these things every day and never really paid attention with my old tires. So lesson learned. New tires + white cross walk = bad. I did clean off the tires with some water. Man were they slick and then I hit them with some sand paper. After about 45 mins of riding I was leaning the bike around turns just like old. Good deal no major damage to the bike or me (except my flipping chest still kills from the fall lol)
 

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I do a weave, but where I lean the bike over without any cornering force. So, I'm leaning the opposite way that the bike is leaning. Whenever I get new tires. I do that a lot whenever I get some clear road around me for the first few miles. You can only get so far doing this, and you'll still have chicken strips. First few turns you go canyon riding, get the bike leaned over but with very little cornering force. In other words, dive deep into the corner but at a slower speed, then lean the bike over a little further while rolling off the throttle and again leaning your body the opposite way.

You basically want to "scrub" the tires without having them under any load for about 50 miles or so is the rule of thumb.

Sorry about your accident.

Yeah, watch out for that paint. grip is made from the rubber molding itself into the pavement irregularites. Not much irregularity on smooth paint!
 

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WTF? Time to quit drinking the Kooolaid.

Welcome to the 21st century. Be easy the first few turns and a little careful a lap or 2 (5 miles maybe). Once they are warmed up you're good to go.

The manufacturing has changed over the years and no longer uses a lot of lube like they once did.

I'll be happy to break in your tires for 100 miles at my next track day. Please PM for shipping details. Save you the trouble of sanding, brake cleaner, burn outs etc.
 

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Burnouts? Sandpaper? Hell no.

But I do drop the pressure of the tires ASAP. My shop fills the tires up according to the book, which is ridiculously high for my climate. I also tend to drop the rear tire pressure below the one of my front tire. Unless I ride with a passenger, the suggested pressure for the rear is far too high.

Otherwise I ride fairly slow on the streets anyways. After riding an hour or two like its a cold and rainy day, the tires are scrubbed in for me.
 

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Burnouts? Sandpaper? Hell no.

But I do drop the pressure of the tires ASAP. My shop fills the tires up according to the book, which is ridiculously high for my climate. I also tend to drop the rear tire pressure below the one of my front tire. Unless I ride with a passenger, the suggested pressure for the rear is far too high.

Otherwise I ride fairly slow on the streets anyways. After riding an hour or two like its a cold and rainy day, the tires are scrubbed in for me.
do you ride 8n ybe artic? what are ur local temps, and pressures u running curious on ur logic??
 

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do you ride 8n ybe artic? what are ur local temps, and pressures u running curious on ur logic??
Do you ride around solo on a front-heavy sportbike, put 40psi in the rear and hit narrow twisties? These numbers only make sense when you are really concerned about longevity of your tire with a passenger. And as a side note, this is why the recommendations have to be taken with a pinch of salt: You bought a two-seater bike, the numbers are for a bike with the mass of two people on it. Half of which directly over the rear wheel.

Actually it is pretty cold where I live. Not necessarily the air, but the road itself. If you ride before May through the Black Forest in Germany, you are bound to hit salted roads. The roads are shaded by hills and trees. Even during a warm spring, they see little sunlight until the summer. Plus, the nights get fairly cold. My roads are often below ambient temperature. So my temperature range is between 15-35 celcius, but especially in spring you should be careful with the road temperatures.
 
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