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Discussion Starter #1
Anyone else get a lot of feedback in the clutch lever after droping the clutch down shifting? Whether its a single downshift or more.

I felt this some in the '04's but a lot in the '07.
 

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Only time I felt anything wrong in the clutch was when I did a hole shot while racing an R1 from a stop. The 10 has such a high first gear that you just have to ride the clutch to stay in the power band. I got some pretty serious chatter. I don't think it was the back tire spinning because it didn't step out or anything. I did plenty of smokey burn outs with my stock tire and never had a problem. I think maybe my clutches may be getting worn a little at 5K miles.
 

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Yes, it's normal. What you're feeling is the slipper clutch activating. Try to be smoother on your downshifts when letting the clutch out and it won't be so dramatic.
 

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Ok, I usually am pretty smooth with the clutch by I tried letting it drop free a few times and it chattered a lot more than usual. I need to read up on slipper clutches. Had one since '04 and all I know is I can drop 3 gears and let go of the clutch and not really worry about consequences like on my '02 6R I had.
 

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As the transmission back drives the clutch, the hub has a series of small ramps that disengage the drive plates from the fiber plates and allow the pack to move apart and slip slightly and if you were slipping the clutch. The higher the back torque through the system, the more the plates are pushed apart and the clutch slips to keep the rear wheel from hopping and upsetting the chassis as it tries to drive the motor. But as the clutch plates move apart to slip, the force on them is less, so they start to re-engage. This process happens over and over as the system tries to stabilize itself and you can actually feel it happening in the lever slightly as a shudder in the lever.

The smoother you are with the downshifts, the quicker the system stabilizes and you'll feel it less.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
As the transmission back drives the clutch, the hub has a series of small ramps that disengage the drive plates from the fiber plates and allow the pack to move apart and slip slightly and if you were slipping the clutch. The higher the back torque through the system, the more the plates are pushed apart and the clutch slips to keep the rear wheel from hopping and upsetting the chassis as it tries to drive the motor. But as the clutch plates move apart to slip, the force on them is less, so they start to re-engage. This process happens over and over as the system tries to stabilize itself and you can actually feel it happening in the lever slightly as a shudder in the lever.

The smoother you are with the downshifts, the quicker the system stabilizes and you'll feel it less.
:idea:Wow, thanks for the awesome explanation! I am thinking I should still read about back torque limiters but I prolly won't understand the technicalities. Thanks for the plain language! rep for you! The shutter in the lever is exactly what I was talking about.
 

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I noticed the same shudder at the lever with my 04 and the 08. Always wondered what that was all about.
 

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Ya, but do you get that same shutter when accelerating from a stop? Like during a whole shot?
 

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As the transmission back drives the clutch, the hub has a series of small ramps that disengage the drive plates from the fiber plates and allow the pack to move apart and slip slightly and if you were slipping the clutch. The higher the back torque through the system, the more the plates are pushed apart and the clutch slips to keep the rear wheel from hopping and upsetting the chassis as it tries to drive the motor. But as the clutch plates move apart to slip, the force on them is less, so they start to re-engage. This process happens over and over as the system tries to stabilize itself and you can actually feel it happening in the lever slightly as a shudder in the lever.

The smoother you are with the downshifts, the quicker the system stabilizes and you'll feel it less.
Plain and simple. Good explaination. :wink:
 
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