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Wanna do mine for me? :badteeth:
LOL, I gotta test-ride this thing! I've never owned a new bike that needed this kind of attention to the headset (sorry that's a bicycling term but easier to say and type). I have a 2012 GSX-R 750, I've R&R'd the upper triple twice to install and then remove Heli-Bars (hated them, they just mess up the whole riding position and handling, if you want a sport-tourer, get one!) and the headset never budged off factory assembly. No other bike I've owned from new has ever had an issue like this.

I chalk it up to the thoroughbred nature of these newest lightweight monsters. Everything is ultra-light and fine-tuned. With engineering, the lighter it is, the more precise the assembly and adjustment has to be. Like a Harley (I had a couple) you just crank that bitch down until she's tight and ride the crap out of it. My 2006 Dyna-Glide, really fun bike, I put around 18,000 miles on it before I sold it, and it never gave me any trouble. But then it's a cruiser, a big chunk of steel. I got a 2013 CB1100 now, that's my cruiser. Great bike but same thing, tube steel frame, everything big and heavy, very tolerant of things not being torqued or assembled "just right". I was on the CB1100 forum for a couple of years and the guys that like that bike, let me tell you, most of them would not last five seconds on this forum, the technology in the ZX-10R is so far beyond them. Not all, but the majority of guys attracted to that type of bike don't care about operating systems or networks or CANBUS or ECU or any of the complicated shit we take for granted. When I tried to explain what a reflash was you could not believe how hard it was to get across that every parameter of the engine could be changed just with an upload. (Upload, what's that?).

That's a lot of philosophizing about a steering stem but that's why I am not really bothered by this, I got the 10R because of what it is, the latest technology, and it's not just electronics, it's the metals, plastics, the touch you need to maintain and ride it. It's EXACTLY what I wanted. You have to be in touch with this bike, more than ever before, going back 32 years anyway. My first superbike (VF750F) was a tank, a boat anchor.

So hats off to anyone who can master this beast and get on good terms with it.:eek:ccasion1
 

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Success

Rode about half my normal loop today, 100 miles or so. The "click" is completely gone.

But that's not all. The adjustment completely changed the handling and feel of the bike. This thing was loose as a goose, even though it felt solid when checking it on the blocks.

Some big differences:

-front end feels much more solid and connected
-front end tracks over rough pavement in a turn much better
-bike turns slightly slower at low speeds but is very stable at higher speeds
-slightly more vibration in the handlebars at freeway speeds

Basically, that click, which is only a few thousands of play, really messed up the handling of the bike. A few thousandths in the steering head translate to a few hundredths at the contact patch. The bars used to flop around like a bicycle, now it's tight and precise.

Feels like a new bike again.

One strong recommendation: Do not overtorque the top nut (steering head stem nut) to try to cure this. All that does is put more tension on the stem ring nuts and crush the hell out of everything, especially the lower bearing. It might feel better for a while but it's not the right way to do it.

What I found was the top stem ring nut totally loosened. The top ring nut, when properly snugged against the bottom stem ring nut, prevents the stem head nut (36mm on top) from crushing the top bearing. When it's all done right the stem will have the right amount of freedom to move without play.

What happens is that riding the new bike will sometimes drive the bearings just a little more deeply into the races and then you get movement.

WARNING: DO NOT DO THIS IF YOU ARE NOT AN EXPERIENCED MECHANIC. FUCKING THIS UP COULD BE A PROBLEM. MAKE SURE YOU HAVE THE SERVICE MANUAL AVAILABLE FOR DETAILS AND TORQUE SPECIFICATIONS. DON'T SAY I DIDN'T WARN YOU. YOU HAVE BEEN WARNED.

If you have the bike up on blocks with the front end free to move, you do the following:

  1. Put something under the front tire to keep the forks from dropping out of the bike, like a piece of wood.
  2. Cover the tank with a towel or something if you care about it
  3. Remove windscreen (easier to use the spanner wrench)
  4. Remove brake reservoir (4mm hex bolt on steel mount) and let it hang in place. This is to allow access to the right fork upper pinch bolt.
  5. Remove steering damper
  6. Remove top stem nut (36mm)
  7. Remove 2 5mm bolts holding handlebars to the upper triple clamp underneath each bar
  8. Loosen upper pinch bolts
  9. Gently lift upper triple away from forks, set to left side of tank
  10. Notice the upper ring nut is probably loose as fuck
  11. Bend tabs away from upper ring nut and back it away from lower ring nut. MAKE SURE YOU HAVE YOUR SUPPORT UNDER THE FRONT TIRE NOW.
  12. Back lower ring nut (the one directly against the bearing) until it's easier to turn. It won't ever get loose because the forks are hanging from it and the grease seal is dragging on it. This will be about 1/2 turn or a little more. Now the forks are hanging from this with a lot of play.
  13. Take your spanner wrench (stem nut wrench) and slowly tighten the bottom stem nut (you just loosened it) until you feel it seat. The will be a very noticeable "bottoming out" feeling and it will suddenly get quite hard to turn and it will turn in "jerks" rather than smoothly. Tighten it about 1/8 turn past this point.
  14. Now snug the top ring nut down on top of the bottom one, with the washer in between as it was. Once it seats, you will want to turn it so that the 1st or 2nd notch past the seating point (where you can feel it make contact with the washer) lines up with the tab. Try for the second tab past seating. This is tricky as the bottom nut will want to spin. This is actually OK, if it has to spin a little, just get them lined up and snugged, and bend the two tabs back in to lock them together.
  15. If the bottom nut moved at all (which it surely will) then use your spanner to again tighten the bottom nut (now locked to the top nut) against the bearing as you did earlier, that is, about 1/8 turn past the "bottoming out" point where it suddenly gets hard to turn. You MUST be sure to have the front tire supported so the forks are not hanging during this procedure, otherwise you won't be able to feel it properly.
  16. When all this is done, check the feel of the forks for free movement. They should be quite free at this point.
  17. Reinstall the upper triple, only tightening the 36mm stem head nut. You'll do the pinch bolts and handlebar bolts when it's right.
  18. Tighten the 36mm nut to the specified torque of 58 ft lbs. Note if the bars are still quite free to turn. They should TO SOME DEGREE have a tendency to flop to one side or the other without much of a push. If you push on the bars and as soon as you let go, they stop moving with a slight rebound to the other direction, THIS IS TOO TIGHT.
  19. Take off the upper triple and back the pair of stem nuts off no more than 1-2 degrees, that is very little. It doesn't take much.
  20. Repeat the process of installing the upper triple, torquing the 36mm nut, and checking the bars for freedom. If you are good, it'll only take a couple of tries but you may need to work at it. It's really all about feel.
  21. When you feel you have it right, complete the job by reinstalling the pinch bolts and the bolts that secure the handlebars to the upper triple clamp, using the specified torque values.
  22. With upper triple clamp secured, you can take one last step and loosen all four lower triple clamp pinch bolts, retorque the 36mm stem head nut after backing it off, and then retorque the lower fork pinch bolts. That should get everything settled. This makes quite a difference in making sure the front end is not under some strange torque stress.
  23. Recheck freedom of movement after the whole thing has been secured and torqued properly. If something has changed at this point, you can then just remove the upper triple one last time and adjust the pair of locked stem nuts again. (Don't feel badly if you have to do this, I did). There is no need to retorque the lower pinch bolts at this point unless you really want to be perfect. Most likely you won't have to make any further adjustments.
  24. Reinstall the brake reservoir and windscreen. You can clean all the bugs and shit from under the screen while you're at it.
  25. Double-check every single thing before test-riding it.

Finally: yes, it WANTS a rider! -scout
 

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Formerly "bms"
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Rode about half my normal loop today, 100 miles or so. The "click" is completely gone.

But that's not all. The adjustment completely changed the handling and feel of the bike. This thing was loose as a goose, even though it felt solid when checking it on the blocks.

Some big differences:

-front end feels much more solid and connected
-front end tracks over rough pavement in a turn much better
-bike turns slightly slower at low speeds but is very stable at higher speeds
-slightly more vibration in the handlebars at freeway speeds

Basically, that click, which is only a few thousands of play, really messed up the handling of the bike. A few thousandths in the steering head translate to a few hundredths at the contact patch. The bars used to flop around like a bicycle, now it's tight and precise.

Feels like a new bike again.

One strong recommendation: Do not overtorque the top nut (steering head stem nut) to try to cure this. All that does is put more tension on the stem ring nuts and crush the hell out of everything, especially the lower bearing. It might feel better for a while but it's not the right way to do it.

What I found was the top stem ring nut totally loosened. The top ring nut, when properly snugged against the bottom stem ring nut, prevents the stem head nut (36mm on top) from crushing the top bearing. When it's all done right the stem will have the right amount of freedom to move without play.

What happens is that riding the new bike will sometimes drive the bearings just a little more deeply into the races and then you get movement.

WARNING: DO NOT DO THIS IF YOU ARE NOT AN EXPERIENCED MECHANIC. FUCKING THIS UP COULD BE A PROBLEM. MAKE SURE YOU HAVE THE SERVICE MANUAL AVAILABLE FOR DETAILS AND TORQUE SPECIFICATIONS. DON'T SAY I DIDN'T WARN YOU. YOU HAVE BEEN WARNED.

If you have the bike up on blocks with the front end free to move, you do the following:

  1. Put something under the front tire to keep the forks from dropping out of the bike, like a piece of wood.
  2. Cover the tank with a towel or something if you care about it
  3. Remove windscreen (easier to use the spanner wrench)
  4. Remove brake reservoir (4mm hex bolt on steel mount) and let it hang in place. This is to allow access to the right fork upper pinch bolt.
  5. Remove steering damper
  6. Remove top stem nut (36mm)
  7. Remove 2 5mm bolts holding handlebars to the upper triple clamp underneath each bar
  8. Loosen upper pinch bolts
  9. Gently lift upper triple away from forks, set to left side of tank
  10. Notice the upper ring nut is probably loose as fuck
  11. Bend tabs away from upper ring nut and back it away from lower ring nut. MAKE SURE YOU HAVE YOUR SUPPORT UNDER THE FRONT TIRE NOW.
  12. Back lower ring nut (the one directly against the bearing) until it's easier to turn. It won't ever get loose because the forks are hanging from it and the grease seal is dragging on it. This will be about 1/2 turn or a little more. Now the forks are hanging from this with a lot of play.
  13. Take your spanner wrench (stem nut wrench) and slowly tighten the bottom stem nut (you just loosened it) until you feel it seat. The will be a very noticeable "bottoming out" feeling and it will suddenly get quite hard to turn and it will turn in "jerks" rather than smoothly. Tighten it about 1/8 turn past this point.
  14. Now snug the top ring nut down on top of the bottom one, with the washer in between as it was. Once it seats, you will want to turn it so that the 1st or 2nd notch past the seating point (where you can feel it make contact with the washer) lines up with the tab. Try for the second tab past seating. This is tricky as the bottom nut will want to spin. This is actually OK, if it has to spin a little, just get them lined up and snugged, and bend the two tabs back in to lock them together.
  15. If the bottom nut moved at all (which it surely will) then use your spanner to again tighten the bottom nut (now locked to the top nut) against the bearing as you did earlier, that is, about 1/8 turn past the "bottoming out" point where it suddenly gets hard to turn. You MUST be sure to have the front tire supported so the forks are not hanging during this procedure, otherwise you won't be able to feel it properly.
  16. When all this is done, check the feel of the forks for free movement. They should be quite free at this point.
  17. Reinstall the upper triple, only tightening the 36mm stem head nut. You'll do the pinch bolts and handlebar bolts when it's right.
  18. Tighten the 36mm nut to the specified torque of 58 ft lbs. Note if the bars are still quite free to turn. They should TO SOME DEGREE have a tendency to flop to one side or the other without much of a push. If you push on the bars and as soon as you let go, they stop moving with a slight rebound to the other direction, THIS IS TOO TIGHT.
  19. Take off the upper triple and back the pair of stem nuts off no more than 1-2 degrees, that is very little. It doesn't take much.
  20. Repeat the process of installing the upper triple, torquing the 36mm nut, and checking the bars for freedom. If you are good, it'll only take a couple of tries but you may need to work at it. It's really all about feel.
  21. When you feel you have it right, complete the job by reinstalling the pinch bolts and the bolts that secure the handlebars to the upper triple clamp, using the specified torque values.
  22. With upper triple clamp secured, you can take one last step and loosen all four lower triple clamp pinch bolts, retorque the 36mm stem head nut after backing it off, and then retorque the lower fork pinch bolts. That should get everything settled. This makes quite a difference in making sure the front end is not under some strange torque stress.
  23. Recheck freedom of movement after the whole thing has been secured and torqued properly. If something has changed at this point, you can then just remove the upper triple one last time and adjust the pair of locked stem nuts again. (Don't feel badly if you have to do this, I did). There is no need to retorque the lower pinch bolts at this point unless you really want to be perfect. Most likely you won't have to make any further adjustments.
  24. Reinstall the brake reservoir and windscreen. You can clean all the bugs and shit from under the screen while you're at it.
  25. Double-check every single thing before test-riding it.

Finally: yes, it WANTS a rider! -scout
Once again, will you do it for me :badteeth:
 

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omg, Fang, you sure COMPLICATE things! just listen to me as I beat the crap outta mine. Blew out a bearing on the black g4 and 50k and now just passed 16000 miles today on the white. All mileage on twists. Bike doesn't careless about what I do as long as I give it the throttle. Not talking wot, but it wants the throttle ALL THE TIME. Trick is to figure out HOW to give it what it wants...in the most tricky places. lol!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


Like today. Steep tight downhill on QUIMBY two 180's that ACTUALLY want 10 mph and come around the turn and there is popo with lights on with a cager parked in front both on side, outside on 180. I thought, this is gonna be a little distracting tricky, keeping the throttle cracked while ignoring all the action and jamming.

I did, though!!!!!!!!!!!!!! oh yeah. Not sure what I looked like but sure felt like I was in my element. Should be...do it EVERY FOOKIN DAY!!!!!!!!!!!!! LOL!
 

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omg, Fang, you sure COMPLICATE things! just listen to me as I beat the crap outta mine. Blew out a bearing on the black g4 and 50k and now just passed 16000 miles today on the white. All mileage on twists. Bike doesn't careless about what I do as long as I give it the throttle. Not talking wot, but it wants the throttle ALL THE TIME. Trick is to figure out HOW to give it what it wants...in the most tricky places. lol!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


Like today. Steep tight downhill on QUIMBY two 180's that ACTUALLY want 10 mph and come around the turn and there is popo with lights on with a cager parked in front both on side, outside on 180. I thought, this is gonna be a little distracting tricky, keeping the throttle cracked while ignoring all the action and jamming.

I did, though!!!!!!!!!!!!!! oh yeah. Not sure what I looked like but sure felt like I was in my element. Should be...do it EVERY FOOKIN DAY!!!!!!!!!!!!! LOL!
I like your style. You are a lot younger than I am, I am certain. But I can't fault you for your enthusiasm because I used to be exactly the same way, as in "LET'S RIDE!" But I ride a lot for an old sucker and still have my fun, trust me on this.

One thing about this ZX-10R Gen 4, this bike just wants you to give it more stick all the time. This thing feels more planted and confidence-inspiring at high lean angles than any bike I have, even the 2012 GSX-R 750. I think the 190 tire helps with this but also the longer wheelbase and a lot more rake and trail.

That's where all this tech comes in. Fixing the steering stem cured some handling problems. This is finely-honed machine, not like the bikes we had in the 1980s. It needs attention but it rewards the rider for taking good care of it, too.

I had a race team, club level, my rider won several championships. I built the bike. I learned to pay attention to this shit then. You can't have your rider out there on something that isn't right. This clicking thing just got to the point I knew it was a problem that needed fixing and it was. Don't ignore your machine, you have to count on it when the shit hits the fan!
 

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I chalk it up to the thoroughbred nature of these newest lightweight monsters. Everything is ultra-light and fine-tuned.
I hate to say it Fang but I think KHI just dropped the ball on tightening the steering stem nuts when they built it. I own/have owned a lot of sportbikes and not had the steering stem nuts loosen up, my '09 ZX-6R is a good example.

A lot of us have had this issue with the Gen 4s, just like the clutch problems some of us have had on the Gen 4, it's a build quality issue in my opinion. Not to take anything away from a great machine, one of my all time favorites but at the end of the day, it's built by humans.
 

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I hate to say it Fang but I think KHI just dropped the ball on tightening the steering stem nuts when they built it. I own/have owned a lot of sportbikes and not had the steering stem nuts loosen up, my '09 ZX-6R is a good example.

A lot of us have had this issue with the Gen 4s, just like the clutch problems some of us have had on the Gen 4, it's a build quality issue in my opinion. Not to take anything away from a great machine, one of my all time favorites but at the end of the day, it's built by humans.
I agree. I think once it's redone, it'll probably be good for along time. Their procedure needs to be revised. I've NEVER had this happen before. But it was curable. Even a good backyard mechanic can correct it but it IS a warranty issue, so anyone not comfy tackling the procedure should get Kawasaki to take care of it.:thumbsup:
 

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Rode about half my normal loop today, 100 miles or so. The "click" is completely gone.

But that's not all. The adjustment completely changed the handling and feel of the bike. This thing was loose as a goose, even though it felt solid when checking it on the blocks.

Some big differences:

-front end feels much more solid and connected
-front end tracks over rough pavement in a turn much better
-bike turns slightly slower at low speeds but is very stable at higher speeds
-slightly more vibration in the handlebars at freeway speeds

Basically, that click, which is only a few thousands of play, really messed up the handling of the bike. A few thousandths in the steering head translate to a few hundredths at the contact patch. The bars used to flop around like a bicycle, now it's tight and precise.

Feels like a new bike again.

One strong recommendation: Do not overtorque the top nut (steering head stem nut) to try to cure this. All that does is put more tension on the stem ring nuts and crush the hell out of everything, especially the lower bearing. It might feel better for a while but it's not the right way to do it.

What I found was the top stem ring nut totally loosened. The top ring nut, when properly snugged against the bottom stem ring nut, prevents the stem head nut (36mm on top) from crushing the top bearing. When it's all done right the stem will have the right amount of freedom to move without play.

What happens is that riding the new bike will sometimes drive the bearings just a little more deeply into the races and then you get movement.

WARNING: DO NOT DO THIS IF YOU ARE NOT AN EXPERIENCED MECHANIC. FUCKING THIS UP COULD BE A PROBLEM. MAKE SURE YOU HAVE THE SERVICE MANUAL AVAILABLE FOR DETAILS AND TORQUE SPECIFICATIONS. DON'T SAY I DIDN'T WARN YOU. YOU HAVE BEEN WARNED.

If you have the bike up on blocks with the front end free to move, you do the following:

  1. Put something under the front tire to keep the forks from dropping out of the bike, like a piece of wood.
  2. Cover the tank with a towel or something if you care about it
  3. Remove windscreen (easier to use the spanner wrench)
  4. Remove brake reservoir (4mm hex bolt on steel mount) and let it hang in place. This is to allow access to the right fork upper pinch bolt.
  5. Remove steering damper
  6. Remove top stem nut (36mm)
  7. Remove 2 5mm bolts holding handlebars to the upper triple clamp underneath each bar
  8. Loosen upper pinch bolts
  9. Gently lift upper triple away from forks, set to left side of tank
  10. Notice the upper ring nut is probably loose as fuck
  11. Bend tabs away from upper ring nut and back it away from lower ring nut. MAKE SURE YOU HAVE YOUR SUPPORT UNDER THE FRONT TIRE NOW.
  12. Back lower ring nut (the one directly against the bearing) until it's easier to turn. It won't ever get loose because the forks are hanging from it and the grease seal is dragging on it. This will be about 1/2 turn or a little more. Now the forks are hanging from this with a lot of play.
  13. Take your spanner wrench (stem nut wrench) and slowly tighten the bottom stem nut (you just loosened it) until you feel it seat. The will be a very noticeable "bottoming out" feeling and it will suddenly get quite hard to turn and it will turn in "jerks" rather than smoothly. Tighten it about 1/8 turn past this point.
  14. Now snug the top ring nut down on top of the bottom one, with the washer in between as it was. Once it seats, you will want to turn it so that the 1st or 2nd notch past the seating point (where you can feel it make contact with the washer) lines up with the tab. Try for the second tab past seating. This is tricky as the bottom nut will want to spin. This is actually OK, if it has to spin a little, just get them lined up and snugged, and bend the two tabs back in to lock them together.
  15. If the bottom nut moved at all (which it surely will) then use your spanner to again tighten the bottom nut (now locked to the top nut) against the bearing as you did earlier, that is, about 1/8 turn past the "bottoming out" point where it suddenly gets hard to turn. You MUST be sure to have the front tire supported so the forks are not hanging during this procedure, otherwise you won't be able to feel it properly.
  16. When all this is done, check the feel of the forks for free movement. They should be quite free at this point.
  17. Reinstall the upper triple, only tightening the 36mm stem head nut. You'll do the pinch bolts and handlebar bolts when it's right.
  18. Tighten the 36mm nut to the specified torque of 58 ft lbs. Note if the bars are still quite free to turn. They should TO SOME DEGREE have a tendency to flop to one side or the other without much of a push. If you push on the bars and as soon as you let go, they stop moving with a slight rebound to the other direction, THIS IS TOO TIGHT.
  19. Take off the upper triple and back the pair of stem nuts off no more than 1-2 degrees, that is very little. It doesn't take much.
  20. Repeat the process of installing the upper triple, torquing the 36mm nut, and checking the bars for freedom. If you are good, it'll only take a couple of tries but you may need to work at it. It's really all about feel.
  21. When you feel you have it right, complete the job by reinstalling the pinch bolts and the bolts that secure the handlebars to the upper triple clamp, using the specified torque values.
  22. With upper triple clamp secured, you can take one last step and loosen all four lower triple clamp pinch bolts, retorque the 36mm stem head nut after backing it off, and then retorque the lower fork pinch bolts. That should get everything settled. This makes quite a difference in making sure the front end is not under some strange torque stress.
  23. Recheck freedom of movement after the whole thing has been secured and torqued properly. If something has changed at this point, you can then just remove the upper triple one last time and adjust the pair of locked stem nuts again. (Don't feel badly if you have to do this, I did). There is no need to retorque the lower pinch bolts at this point unless you really want to be perfect. Most likely you won't have to make any further adjustments.
  24. Reinstall the brake reservoir and windscreen. You can clean all the bugs and shit from under the screen while you're at it.
  25. Double-check every single thing before test-riding it.

Finally: yes, it WANTS a rider! -scout
The service manager rode my bike and told me that the steering bearing is bad. It will be covered under warranty so I'm not going to show them this post of yours and will just pretend it never happened..... Haha.
 

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The service manager rode my bike and told me that the steering bearing is bad. It will be covered under warranty so I'm not going to show them this post of yours and will just pretend it never happened..... Haha.
How long will it take them? I'm taking mine in next week to get fixed.
 

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The service manager rode my bike and told me that the steering bearing is bad. It will be covered under warranty so I'm not going to show them this post of yours and will just pretend it never happened..... Haha.
Here ya go, Fang! Still, can't figure out how a steering bearing can go bad on our bike. You guys should see the crap loop I ride. Bumps and gravel and so much fun, and county guys work on it all the time so has actually improved past few years. So, I went out and check that nut and it's finger tight. so all goood! lol

Fang. how old are you?????????????? Can't be very old as you sure to think a lot and able to articulate a ton!!!!!!!! So brain sure is in working order!
 

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Here ya go, Fang! Still, can't figure out how a steering bearing can go bad on our bike. You guys should see the crap loop I ride. Bumps and gravel and so much fun, and county guys work on it all the time so has actually improved past few years. So, I went out and check that nut and it's finger tight. so all goood! lol

Fang. how old are you?????????????? Can't be very old as you sure to think a lot and able to articulate a ton!!!!!!!! So brain sure is in working order!
58, we call that "pushing 60".:helmet:
 

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The service manager rode my bike and told me that the steering bearing is bad. It will be covered under warranty so I'm not going to show them this post of yours and will just pretend it never happened..... Haha.
That's great, good on you, mate. Like the man said, Kawi just dropped the ball on some of these but they are making good.
 

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I have been having a front-end oscillation, fore-aft, that felt like an unbalanced tire/wheel on my FZ8 for some time. It happened as I passed through 100-105 mph. I've gone through two different tires and had the balance checked, everything was fine.

Decided to pull the top triple, and sure enough, the stem locknut was loose as f**k. The whole thing was moving noticeably.

I did the "procedure" on it and hope to find it cured, as it did not do this when new.

I also am now noticing the exact same "click" on my GSX-R 750, with just over 7,000 miles on it. It will get the "procedure" soon.

UPDATE: I tore down the FZ8 and performed the adjustment procedure per the manual. It cleaned up the handling, made a big difference, and the shake is gone.

Racers should be looking at this stuff all the time but street riders usually don't. When the owner's manual says to check the steering head, I guess that means tear it down and inspect it. The old "put it on blocks and yank on the forks" test doesn't tell us anything.
 

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That upper ring nut/ slotted nut can be loose.. it doesn't mean that the bearings have slop in them. The two nuts don't lock "against"each other like on pushbikes.
Say what?

The "steering stem lock nut" is not meant to lock against the nut that holds the bearing down? That's what my manual says it does.
 

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I have been having a front-end oscillation, fore-aft, that felt like an unbalanced tire/wheel on my FZ8 for some time. It happened as I passed through 100-105 mph. I've gone through two different tires and had the balance checked, everything was fine.

Decided to pull the top triple, and sure enough, the stem locknut was loose as f**k. The whole thing was moving noticeably.

I did the "procedure" on it and hope to find it cured, as it did not do this when new.

I also am now noticing the exact same "click" on my GSX-R 750, with just over 7,000 miles on it. It will get the "procedure" soon.

UPDATE: I tore down the FZ8 and performed the adjustment procedure per the manual. It cleaned up the handling, made a big difference, and the shake is gone.

Racers should be looking at this stuff all the time but street riders usually don't. When the owner's manual says to check the steering head, I guess that means tear it down and inspect it. The old "put it on blocks and yank on the forks" test doesn't tell us anything.
On fz8? Not your g4. idk, I looked at that nut and I'm having a VERY hard time seeing how that can loosen on its own. I suspect the pos fz8 experience has carried over into new bike g4 generated fears.

I'm sure I'm wrong as you obviously have a rich mind with a lotta experience and easily figure things out. dang site is kinda like a focus group for noob riders with old timers in the background chuckling. lol

Just a thought: if you find a loop that is all crappy and tight and full of gravel and rocks, well, the mind is too filled with real problems instead of imagined! ha! you would get this, too.
 

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Say what?

The "steering stem lock nut" is not meant to lock against the nut that holds the bearing down? That's what my manual says it does.
The two nuts dont “lock” together like on a pushy, The washer part of the locking device is a wave washer when you lightly tighten the top slotted nut down then turn it a little extra “IF needed” to line up the slots, at best you have slightly preloaded the wave washer.

The whole unit as one tightened down by the nut on top of the top triple stops the nuts loosening, as long as the locking tabs contact the slots on both slotted nuts it doesn’t really make any difference.
 

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The two nuts dont “lock” together like on a pushy, The washer part of the locking device is a wave washer when you lightly tighten the top slotted nut down then turn it a little extra “IF needed” to line up the slots, at best you have slightly preloaded the wave washer.

The whole unit as one tightened down by the nut on top of the top triple stops the nuts loosening, as long as the locking tabs contact the slots on both slotted nuts it doesn’t really make any difference.
Well it gets "hand tightened" and then tightened until the groves line up. So yes they get locked together not rattling loose.

 
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