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Discussion Starter #1
Ivan told me to clean the head off before installing the new gasket...that is fine but all the book says is a high flash point cleaner....WD-40 burns, contact clearner burns...anyone have ideas on what I can use to clean it up? I asume just anyything that will catch on fire since the spark of the plug will ignite whatever I use.?
 

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Would'nt use wd-40, mineral spirits to remove oil & etc. Follow up with aeresol (applied to your clean wiping cloth) "brake and contact cleaner"; its flamable properties will be gone by the time the engine is re-assembled. Bel-ray, PJ-1, and Hondaline have good chemicals. Don't inhale-who knows you might have some political asspirations down the line. Good-luck.
 

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When you said cleaning the head, I assumed you meant the gasket surfaces-my above post addresses that-to the best of my experience. If you are trying to remove built up carbon in the combustion chamber, you will probably need a soft wire wheel type attatchment for your drill motor. Do a little at a time and inspect your progress as you go. Blow away any particles (whether they are visible or not) with compressed air. Hope this is helpful info.
 

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The caution against low flash point solvents is mostly to protect against a fire hazard. So don't do it near an ignition source, don't use something INSANE like gasoline, and don't use enormous quantities of solvent!

What I have always done (successfully) is as follows.

Find some gadgets made of plastic of different shapes that you can use as scrapers. An old cloth, a plastic hair brush, a toothbrush, your fingernail, and anything with a straight edge on it will work. The oil and coolant left over on the head surface will probably be enough to keep it wet initially. This will let you get most of the loose stuff off. Scrape it, clean it (rag with a bit of light oil), scrape it, clean it. There will probably still be a ring of gasket material around each cylinder that's on there pretty good. This is OK at this stage, although the more loose stuff you can get off, the better. Never use anything metal, and you want to keep debris cleaned away in case there are any hard particles in it.

The next step: I use Scotch Brite (available at grocery store). It is basically a plastic scrubbing pad. Spray with light oil (anything will work), then go after it with the Scotch Brite. Never rub any one area too long - go over the whole surface evenly in figure-8 patterns. You are aiming for a non-directional finish without too much work being done in any single area. Keep it CLEAN - every so often, wipe off the surface with your oiled rag to get most of the debris out of there, and then you can see your progress. After a few go-rounds, you'll have a nice clean surface. This whole process shouldn't take longer than 10 minutes ... you want to remove the gasket material, not the metal underneath! Miniscule, microscopic bits of gasket material buried into the original machining marks will not prevent the new gasket from sealing. You should not feel anything, no edges or projections.

The third step: Get several clean rags. Spray the head underside with brake cleaner / contact cleaner and wipe it off right away with a clean rag, then repeat this a couple times until the rag comes off clean. Do this quickly, because some of those aggressive cleaners aren't really supposed to be used on aluminum - don't let it sit there, wipe it off straight away.

The tricky part in this is that some debris might get between the valves and the valve seats. You are not using anything metal, so this won't damage the valve seats, but sometimes it can hold a valve open until the engine starts up and blasts it out of there. If you are not taking the valves out, it's better to clean the sealing surface only, and stay out of the combustion chambers when scraping. What's there, won't do any harm. You can spray contact cleaner at the valves, just don't do any scraping there.

The part that's even more fun is cleaning the top of the block ... you have to do that, too. Basically the same process, but it's advisable to rotate the crank until two pistons are at TDC, stuff a rag into the other cylinders, and clean the area around the pistons at TDC. Then rotate engine half a turn, give the top of the cylinders you just did a quick wipe with a CLEAN cloth to get any debris out of there, then repeat on the other two cylinders. ALWAYS stuff a rag into the timing chain tunnel when doing this. If there's oil passages in the head (I think this bike has that), don't get anything down there.

CLEAN CLEAN CLEAN. Don't get any debris into places it shouldn't be getting.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I've tried everything...wd-40, contact cleaner, engine gunk, ether, you name it I've tried it...yes, I'm cleaning the block right now...and I'm kind of high too...should have used more ventilation
 

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GoFaster said:
The caution against low flash point solvents is mostly to protect against a fire hazard. So don't do it near an ignition source, don't use something INSANE like gasoline, and don't use enormous quantities of solvent!

What I have always done (successfully) is as follows.

Find some gadgets made of plastic of different shapes that you can use as scrapers. An old cloth, a plastic hair brush, a toothbrush, your fingernail, and anything with a straight edge on it will work. The oil and coolant left over on the head surface will probably be enough to keep it wet initially. This will let you get most of the loose stuff off. Scrape it, clean it (rag with a bit of light oil), scrape it, clean it. There will probably still be a ring of gasket material around each cylinder that's on there pretty good. This is OK at this stage, although the more loose stuff you can get off, the better. Never use anything metal, and you want to keep debris cleaned away in case there are any hard particles in it.

The next step: I use Scotch Brite (available at grocery store). It is basically a plastic scrubbing pad. Spray with light oil (anything will work), then go after it with the Scotch Brite. Never rub any one area too long - go over the whole surface evenly in figure-8 patterns. You are aiming for a non-directional finish without too much work being done in any single area. Keep it CLEAN - every so often, wipe off the surface with your oiled rag to get most of the debris out of there, and then you can see your progress. After a few go-rounds, you'll have a nice clean surface. This whole process shouldn't take longer than 10 minutes ... you want to remove the gasket material, not the metal underneath! Miniscule, microscopic bits of gasket material buried into the original machining marks will not prevent the new gasket from sealing. You should not feel anything, no edges or projections.

The third step: Get several clean rags. Spray the head underside with brake cleaner / contact cleaner and wipe it off right away with a clean rag, then repeat this a couple times until the rag comes off clean. Do this quickly, because some of those aggressive cleaners aren't really supposed to be used on aluminum - don't let it sit there, wipe it off straight away.

The tricky part in this is that some debris might get between the valves and the valve seats. You are not using anything metal, so this won't damage the valve seats, but sometimes it can hold a valve open until the engine starts up and blasts it out of there. If you are not taking the valves out, it's better to clean the sealing surface only, and stay out of the combustion chambers when scraping. What's there, won't do any harm. You can spray contact cleaner at the valves, just don't do any scraping there.

The part that's even more fun is cleaning the top of the block ... you have to do that, too. Basically the same process, but it's advisable to rotate the crank until two pistons are at TDC, stuff a rag into the other cylinders, and clean the area around the pistons at TDC. Then rotate engine half a turn, give the top of the cylinders you just did a quick wipe with a CLEAN cloth to get any debris out of there, then repeat on the other two cylinders. ALWAYS stuff a rag into the timing chain tunnel when doing this. If there's oil passages in the head (I think this bike has that), don't get anything down there.

CLEAN CLEAN CLEAN. Don't get any debris into places it shouldn't be getting.[/QUOTE

Wow, you should look into wrighting manuals.lol :thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter #10
and the winner is: Fuel Injector cleaner and it will burn...that and an old cotton t-shirt...works like a charm...1 hour and almost everything is clean, while it took me 1.5 hours to find something that would actually work. Tonight I will finish cleaning and get everything back together and ready to be degreed...unless I'm in school until 10:30 like the teacher said.
 

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Laquer Thinner & mineral spirits are very diff. Mineral spirits is plain thinner whereas laquer thinner has laquer which is a much more potent mixture, hotter if you will.

BD
 

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Discussion Starter #16
well the most important part was I was careful like Ivan said and didnt' bubble my engine paint which was one of my main concerns. The block is shiny after I was done...real clean and my cylinder wall have no scoring on them at all.
 
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