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Discussion Starter #1
i have a gen4 2012 zx-10r that i just bought in march. i want to get the suspension set up and tuned properly for my weight. i weight 285lbs and i know the bikes come out of the box set up for <200lb riders. so i know at a bare minumum i need to have it re-sprung for my weight. what added benefits would i see over just re-springing the bike if i was to go to an ohlins rear shock and cartidge inserts for the fork? also is going with the ohlins road and track fork worth the extra $1000 over just going with the cartridge inserts? my riding is mostly agressive street (corner carving) and 3-4 track days a year. i dont mind spending the money on the ohlins parts if the benefits are noticeable over just re-springing the suspension. any help is appreciated
 

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Discussion Starter #2
anyone?
 

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Ive never had any Ohlins so didnt wanna reply but id say if you plan on more track days or getting more serious there, id spring for the Ohlins. Im thinking of going RaceTech internals on my bike. Ive heard good results just from doing that. Sorry couldnt help more.
 

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Couple things.

1. What are your sag numbers? It sounds like you would need stiffer springs but you really wont know until you get sag numbers and figure out what your pace is.

2. Have you ever had your bike suspension set up to YOU? You'd be surprised how well stock suspension performs in today's bikes. I suggest starting their before you consider upgrading to a cartridge kit/shock.

3. IF you have done all the above and and worked with a tuner to find out what your shortcomings are then yes, Ohlins will help you fix your shortcomings and help you move to the next level.

5. A catridge kit vs RT. Truthfully I would look at a ohlins gas cartridge kit before a R&T fork. The R&T forks have more attention to detail then a stock fork tube. And tolerances are WAY tighter. But there are steps you can take to make the stock tubes better. When I was at Ohlins we talked about a bunch of ways to fix oem tubes, but truthfully you probably wouldn't feel a difference unless your running record pace or you just want the bling factor.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Couple things.

1. What are your sag numbers? It sounds like you would need stiffer springs but you really wont know until you get sag numbers and figure out what your pace is.

2. Have you ever had your bike suspension set up to YOU? You'd be surprised how well stock suspension performs in today's bikes. I suggest starting their before you consider upgrading to a cartridge kit/shock.

3. IF you have done all the above and and worked with a tuner to find out what your shortcomings are then yes, Ohlins will help you fix your shortcomings and help you move to the next level.

5. A catridge kit vs RT. Truthfully I would look at a ohlins gas cartridge kit before a R&T fork. The R&T forks have more attention to detail then a stock fork tube. And tolerances are WAY tighter. But there are steps you can take to make the stock tubes better. When I was at Ohlins we talked about a bunch of ways to fix oem tubes, but truthfully you probably wouldn't feel a difference unless your running record pace or you just want the bling factor.
i have never had the suspension set up for me yet.. i was told by a couple of guys that i would need to get stiffer springs because of my weight. so you think i should set sag and buy stiffer springs based on my sag numbers? sorry, i really am a noob when it comes to suspension tuning.
 

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i have never had the suspension set up for me yet.. i was told by a couple of guys that i would need to get stiffer springs because of my weight. so you think i should set sag and buy stiffer springs based on my sag numbers? sorry, i really am a noob when it comes to suspension tuning.
My advice:

1) get a spring and revalve for the rear shock
2) set the sag, and use the baseline Sport Rider settings for rebound and compression
3) Go to a track day and have the suspension vendor there set it up
 

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If I could afford Ohlins I would get them. They have tons of data and really great support. If you dont want to spend that much then take Animals advice. Springs and revalves for the shock and forks and hit the track and let a suspesion vendor work with you for the day. It makes a TON of difference in what you can or cannot do on the bike. Oh and report back here with what you did and how it worked. :badteeth:
 

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Schooled!
 

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so you think i should set sag and buy stiffer springs based on my sag numbers?
Sag is the difference between the full extension of the fork and the compression with you on the bike, so it's a function of the fork, including the spring inside. On my gen1, the travel of the fork is 120mm and I set the sag to about 30mm. The idea is to set the sag in such a way that you still have plenty of room for the fork to compress, but also that the spring is soft enough that you can utilize the remaining fork travel. The starting sag (for further fine tuning) is usually recommended to be 30-35mm.
You set the sag by changing the preload on the spring, the more preload, the harder the spring will appear to be. In your case you may run out of preload before you set the sag to the desired settings, so you may indeed want to get stiffer springs. You choose springs based on their compression rate, i.e. weight needed to compress it by a fixed amout, for example 1kg/mm. I don't know what the exact rate is for the stock springs, but RaceTech website has an online calculator that can help you find the right spring for you.
 
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