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MIA Post Whore
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8,727 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
decided to start a new thread instead of high jacking the head gasket thread..

Big Daddy said:
Miykl

Its something left for the very knowlegeable as it can often times make the diff between a good running bike VS a great running bike. Time & patience are the keys to well degreed Yams. :wink:

BD
To see gains I would agree. I was more wondering about checking how close they are to factory specs. Does this take a genius or can a coonass do it?
 

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Supercharged Mod
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4,391 Posts
A coonass with the right tools and a semi-functional brain which is capable of adding, subtracting, multiplying, and dividing with a calculator can do it provided that you have first made sure that the camshafts and sprockets have slots so that it is *possible* to adjust it. :D (Otherwise, get the sprockets to a machine shop for having the holes slotted.)

Special tools needed: degree wheel and pointer with any necessary adapters, a sparkplug that has been gutted and replaced with a projecting piece of steel so that it can act as a top-stop for the piston (purpose: precisely locating TDC), dial indicator with any necessary adapters.

Nutshell summary:
1. Attach degree wheel to crankshaft/flywheel and attach pointer to wherever suitable.
2. Remove one (or all) spark plugs.
3. Install your special piston top-stop in cylinder #1. Before doing this, make sure that piston is not at top-dead-centre.
4. Rotate the engine forward by hand until piston touches top-stop. Note degree reading. Rotate engine backward by hand until piston again touches top-stop. Note degree reading. Now, reset the wheel and pointer so that "zero" is precisely halfway between the two readings that you took. To recheck it, perform the procedure again. Now, if you have done it right, it should stop turning forward the same number of degrees from zero that it stops turning backward - meaning that top-dead-center is precisely halfway between the two places that your top-stop stops the piston from each direction.
5. Take out your piston stop.
6. Set up your dial indicator to measure cylinder 1 intake valve lifter. Set it at zero with the cam off the lifter.
7. Rotate the engine forward until that cam pushes the dial indicator open the most. This is the *approximate* lobe center. To locate it precisely, rotate the engine backward until the dial indicator backs out 0.060" from the maximum setting and then rotate it forward until the dial indicator is out 0.040" from the maximum setting (the purpose of going too far back and then coming back forward is to make sure that you have taken up any "backlash" in the chain drive in the forward direction only). Note the degree reading. Then, turn the crank forward, past the maximum lift, and then again until valve is down 0.040" from the maximum lift (now on the other side of the lobe). Note this degree reading. Average that with the previous one, this is precisely where maximum lift occurs.

If it is not happening where you want it to happen, loosen the cam-to-sprocket bolts, adjust it, tighten the bolts, then check it again until you get it where you want it. Then, repeat the whole thing again for the exhaust camshaft.

After completion, remove your cam sprocket bolts one at a time so as to not disturb the setting, apply a drop of blue Loctite, and torque to specifications. You do *not* want those bolts coming off.

What's the hardest part of this whole procedure?

Figuring out what the ideal setting is to adjust them to. It's not necessarily factory specs. I have no idea what's best for this engine.
 

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Supercharged Mod
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4,391 Posts
By the way, if you don't have a degree wheel, you can make one. Use whatever graphics / CAD program you want (I use Autocad) to make a circle divided and marked as required, print it out on a laser printer, and glue it to whatever round metal widget that you want to attach to the crankshaft and use as a degree wheel.
 

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MIA Post Whore
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Discussion Starter #5
Hmmmmmm- I think I can, I think I can!!! Next cold spell, I just may give it a go. Great "How-To". Between that and a good read through of the manual, I think it's do-able given some proven settings. One question, how long should the spark plug "stopper" rig be?

Mods- I think this needs to be moved to our new How- to section, eh?
 
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