Kawasaki ZX-10R Forum banner

21 - 32 of 32 Posts

·
The Pace
Joined
·
6,962 Posts
What tdh said; if a noob buys a super all they do is ride it to Starbucks then sell it after about 5k miles of slabs. Seasoned riders always know that EACH bike has its own personality so simply feel for awhile to learn from the bike. That does NOT mean they may treat the bike easy, but simply that they are not pushing the bike until the bike has figured out if the rider is a keeper.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,626 Posts
You can see them running it through its paces on the dyno in a few of the shots in this video. They do that will all the bikes before they leave the factory. That's why your headers come with a nice shade of purple:

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
Here is some insight from someone who has been around engine and transmission manufacturing for about 17 years.

Most manufacturers no longer "run" a motor on a dyno after building it. They do what is called a "cold test". The motor and trans assembly is coupled to an electric motor that spins the motor up. The plugs are not yet installed but the motor and trans are mostly otherwise complete. With the motor spinning many things are measure such as, compression, air flow/vacuum at different throttle opening, all installed motor sensor data, and inputs from various vibration and noise sensors external of the motor. The transmission is shifted through the gears and the input and output speeds are monitored. The 1st time I saw this I thought it was a bad idea as what's better than running the motor. The truth is with all of the sensor data coming in the process is better at finding defects and is faster, meaning more throughput.

The motor is run once installed in the bike on a chassis dyno to make sure everything is primed and ready to go. This is the reason the bike has one to a few miles on it when brand new. They just run the motor, get it warmed up, run it up and down the gears, and ship it. No power pulls or anything like that.

As for when to put in synthetic oil, many new motors and transmissions come with synthetic from the factory. There is no need to wait at all.

With my brand new 2019 I ran the motor a few heat and cool down cycles on a stand, drained the factory oil, poured in synthetic, and put it on a dyno and tuned it. It had about 1 mile on it when we started and maybe 20 when we were done. From there the bike went straight to the race track. I haven't had a single issue with the bike so far. (Knock on wood)

Sent from my SM-G935R4 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,389 Posts
This is the way it has been for a long time, modern machining is far far more accurate and efficient than it used to be, the old theory of rings bedding into cylinders is well outdated. Oil is so much more advanced rings do not grind against nikasil coatings FULLSTOP. Transmission like everything else is finished to a higher standard than ever before, shell bearings, pinions etc are all finished to a much higher standard. I haven't been on the Kawasaki course but Suzuki have taught as "Bloose Post" above for many years, Start bike run upto temperature allow to cool, repeat, change to race oil then dyno simple as that!!
 

·
Registered
2018 ZX10R SE
Joined
·
633 Posts
There is still the initial honing in the cylinder and the beginning of setting the rings but it really isn't nearly as big a deal and mostly it allows any irregularities to smooth out without the manufacturer having to foot the bill if something was run hard right away. But yeah mostly the break in shit is bs. Just gotta get the metal out of the pan and get fresh oil in her
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
How did you not wanna kill that guy ?
That is always the first reaction, my friend. Takes about 16 seconds to cool down and realize that this type of stuff is already in the script at a track day.

I will say I’m more worried about what’s behind me than in front. I try to just go as fast as possible. Lol.
 

·
Registered
2018 ZX10R SE
Joined
·
633 Posts
That is always the first reaction, my friend. Takes about 16 seconds to cool down and realize that this type of stuff is already in the script at a track day.

I will say I’m more worried about what’s behind me than in front. I try to just go as fast as possible. Lol.
That right there is the very reason I was nervous when I took my bike to the track. A good day at the track is one in which your bike comes home in one piece...
 

·
Registered
18 zx10r
Joined
·
164 Posts
Here is some insight from someone who has been around engine and transmission manufacturing for about 17 years.

Most manufacturers no longer "run" a motor on a dyno after building it. They do what is called a "cold test". The motor and trans assembly is coupled to an electric motor that spins the motor up. The plugs are not yet installed but the motor and trans are mostly otherwise complete. With the motor spinning many things are measure such as, compression, air flow/vacuum at different throttle opening, all installed motor sensor data, and inputs from various vibration and noise sensors external of the motor. The transmission is shifted through the gears and the input and output speeds are monitored. The 1st time I saw this I thought it was a bad idea as what's better than running the motor. The truth is with all of the sensor data coming in the process is better at finding defects and is faster, meaning more throughput.

The motor is run once installed in the bike on a chassis dyno to make sure everything is primed and ready to go. This is the reason the bike has one to a few miles on it when brand new. They just run the motor, get it warmed up, run it up and down the gears, and ship it. No power pulls or anything like that.

As for when to put in synthetic oil, many new motors and transmissions come with synthetic from the factory. There is no need to wait at all.

With my brand new 2019 I ran the motor a few heat and cool down cycles on a stand, drained the factory oil, poured in synthetic, and put it on a dyno and tuned it. It had about 1 mile on it when we started and maybe 20 when we were done. From there the bike went straight to the race track. I haven't had a single issue with the bike so far. (Knock on wood)

Sent from my SM-G935R4 using Tapatalk
I took the factory Ducati tour and that's exactly how the engines were run, then placed in to the bike. The time on the dyno was minimal. That day they were working on the V4's :D.
 
21 - 32 of 32 Posts
Top